Start Your Halloween Right by Watching Elephants Pulverize Giant Pumpkins

Everybody has their own Halloween tradition, whether it’s taking chocolate from strangers or doing shots of vile, candy-corn flavored vodka. But the elephant family at the Oregon Zoo’s annual “Squishing of the Squash” its hands-down my favorite.

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This Gorgeous Poster Contains Every Single Bird You’ll See in North America

Whether you’re a bird lover or a data fiend, this poster will please you immensely.

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Watching This Vampire Bat on a Treadmill Never Gets Old

We think of bats as swooping through the air to hunt their prey, but the vampire bat is known to creep along the ground to stalk its prey. Put it on a tiny treadmill, and the crafty critter can also break into a full gallop, using its wings to propel itself along the ground.

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A Reptile With No Penis Just Solved a Baffling Scientific Mystery

The tuatara isn’t actually a lizard. It’s the last survivor of a 250 million year old group of reptiles that mostly went extinct with the dinosaurs. It doesn’t have a penis, and ironically, that’s made it a linchpin for understanding how penises evolved in vertebrates.

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It’s Body Length, Not Mass, That Lets the Cheetah Run So Fast

Cheetahs sprint at a blistering top speed of about 59 MPH, while the domestic cat runs at about 30 MPH, close to a blue whale’s 31 MPH, and a three-toed sloth runs less than one MPH. A new paper by a pair of French physicists concludes that it’s the body length, not the mass, of the animal that determines its top speed — at least for animals that can’t fly.

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Crocs Keep an Eye on You While They Sleep

Sleeping with only half your brain sounds like a great way to become a zombie in no time, but for certain marine mammals and birds, it’s a way of life. A new study suggests that crocodiles, too, may be “unihemispheric” sleepers, a finding which makes humans and other full-brain snoozers look more and more like evolutionary oddballs.

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Howler Monkeys With Deeper Voices Have Smaller Balls (And Vice Versa) 

Howler monkeys are loud. (If you doubt me, just click on the video and listen.) They can bring on the noise because they have a built-in amplifier: a huge cup-shaped throat bone that resonates to their song. But a study up in today’s Current Biology suggests that the males with the biggest voices also have the smallest testes.

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Acid in Our Oceans Threatens the Beautiful Sea Butterfly

Last week we looked at sea angels , an aqua-slug whose “foot” has split into wings. And what do sea angels eat? A type of winged sea snail known as a sea butterfly. But sea butterflies are feeling the chemical change as the oceans are becoming more acidic, putting their entire aquatic ecosystem at risk.

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