Crypto is For Everyone—and American History Proves It

Over the last year, law enforcement officials around the world have been pressing hard on the notion that without a magical “backdoor” to access the content of any and all encrypted communications by ordinary people, they’ll be totally incapable of fulfilling their duties to investigate crime and protect the public. EFF and many others have pushed back—including launching a petition with our friends to SaveCrypto, which this week reached 100,000 signatures, forcing a response from President Obama.

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Here’s What Public Safety Agencies Think About Automated License Plate Recognition 

Law enforcement agencies around the country have been all too eager to adopt mass surveillance technologies, but sometimes they have put little effort into ensuring the systems are secure and the sensitive data they collect on everyday people is protected.

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These Senators Voted “Yes” on CISA, But There’s Still Time to Change Their Minds 

Your Senator probably just did something dumb. Yes, I realize I have to be more specific than that: The Senate passed the Cybersecurity Information Sharing Act (CISA) yesterday with a 74-21 vote.

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How To Find and Delete Everything You’ve Ever Said to Google Now

Google likes to keep all of your voice searches on its servers so it can more easily learn to recognize your voice, understand what you might be looking for in the future, and, of course, serve you ads. If you want to review this archive of Google Now searches and clear it out, here’s what to do.

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Google Swears Android Auto Isn’t Spying On You (That Much)

The era of car computers is upon us, and it’s a little scary from a privacy perspective. Look no further than the recent controversy of how much data Google is collecting about drivers using Android Auto. We know this much: Google is probably collecting more data than you realize.

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Private Medical Data of Over 1.5 Million People Wound Up Exposed to Everyone Online 

Police injury reports, drug tests, detailed doctor visit notes, social security numbers—all were inexplicably unveiled on a public subdomain of Amazon Web Services. Welcome to the next big data breach horrorshow. Instead of hackers, it’s old-fashioned neglect that exposed your most sensitive information.

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Cops Finally Limit License Plate Data Collection… Because of Hard Drive Space

The Oakland Police Department, like many local police forces, employs a license plate reader, collecting data on locals’ commutes, rituals, and private behavior. Until recently, all the data from the plate surveillance was stored for however long a computer could hold it. But in discrete fashion the police department did away with the “no formal limit” rule and is now only keeping the data for six months.

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