How To Install 1Channel Kodi Addon In 2018 The Right Way

Here’s how to get 1Channel Kodi 17.6 addon download on your existing Kodi Krypton setup. The process is relatively simple, streamlined, and should work with any modern version of Kodi regardless of the platform that it’s installed on.

[ Continue reading this over at RedmondPie.com ]

How to Quickly Get Stock Prices from Safari URL Bar on Mac

Safari for Mac can quickly give you stock price quotes for any ticker symbol right from the address bar, offering yet another way to keep track of equities for those who like to follow the day-to-day ride of the stock market. Of course you can just google or web-search for a ticker symbol too, but … Read More

How To Install Kodi Git Browser Addon From TVADDONS

Here’s how to download and install Kodi Git Browser addon from TVADDONS for your Kodi setup. This process should work for all modern versions of Kodi and will work regardless of the platform that Kodi is installed on.

[ Continue reading this over at RedmondPie.com ]

Node Plugin To Embed Device Details From Jamf Pro Into Jira Service Desk

Been working on a new plugin to embed device details from Jamf Pro into Jira Service Desk. It looks a little like this:


To access the plugin, see the links below.

The post Node Plugin To Embed Device Details From Jamf Pro Into Jira Service Desk appeared first on krypted.com.

How to Show Hidden Files on MacOS with a Keyboard Shortcut

Modern versions of Mac OS offer a super-fast and easy way to reveal invisible files on a Mac, all you need to use is a keyboard shortcut. With a simple keystroke, you can instantly show hidden files on a Mac, and with another strike of the same keyboard shortcut, you can instantly hide the hidden … Read More

Getting Started with Autopkgr

Autopkgr is basically a small app that allows you to select some repositories of recipes and then watch and run them when they update. It’s a 5 minute or less installation, and at its simplest will put software packages into a folder of your choosing so you can test/upload/scope to users. Or you can integrate it with 3rd party tools like Munki, FileWave, or Jamf using the JSSImporter. Then if you exceed what it can do you can also dig under the hood and use Autopkg itself. It’s an app, and so it needs to run on a Mac. Preferably one that doesn’t do much else. 


Installing Autopkgr

You can obtain the latest release of Autopkgr at https://github.com/lindegroup/autopkgr. To install, drag the app to the Applications folder. 

When you open AutoPkgr for the first time, you’ll prompted for the user name and password to install the helper tool (think menu item). 

The menu item then looks like the following.

These are the most common tasks that administrators would run routinely. They involve checking Autopkg recipes to see if there are new versions of supported software titles, primarily. Opening the Autopkgr app once installed, though, shows us much more. Let’s go through this screen-by-screen in the following sections.


Moving AutoPkg Folders Around 

By default, when installed with Autopkgr, Autopkg stores its cache in ~/Library/AutoPkg/Cache and the repos are sync’d to ~/Library/AutoPkg/RecipeRepos. You can move these using the Choose… button in the Folders & Integration tab of Autopkgr, although it’s not necessary (unless, for example, you need to move the folders to another volume). 

Note: You can also click on the Configure AutoPkg button to add proxies, pre/post processing scripts, and GitHub tokens if needed. 


Keeping Autopkg and Git up-to-date

The Install tab is used to configure AutoPkg settings. If there is a new version of AutoPkg and Git, you’ll see an Install button for each (used to obtain the latest and greatest scripts); otherwise you’ll see a green button indicating it’s up-to-date. 

You can also configure AutoPkgr to be in your startup items by choosing to have it be available at login, and show/hide the Autopkgr menu item and Dock item. 


Configuring Repositories and Recipes

Repositories are where collections of recipes live. Recipes are how they’re built. Think of a recipe as a script that checks for a software update and then follows a known-good way of building that package. Recipes can then be shared (via GitHub) and consumed en masse. 

To configure a repository, click on the “Repos & Recipes” tab in Autopkgr. Then select the repos to use (they are sorted by stars so the most popular appear first). 

Note: There are specific recipes for Jamf Pro at https://github.com/autopkg/jss-recipes.git.

Then you’ll see a list of the recipes (which again, will make packages) that AutoPkgr has access to. Check the ones you want to build and click on the Run Recipes Now. 

If you don’t see a recipe for a title you need, use the search box at the bottom of the screen. That would show you a given entry for any repos that you’ve added. Again, all of the sharing of these repos typically happens through GitHub, but you can add any git url (e.g. if you wanted a repo of recipes in your organization. 

Once you’ve checked the boxes for all the recipes you want to automate, you can then use the “Run AutoPkg Now” option in the menu items to build, or rely on a routine run, as described in the next section.


Scheduling Routine Builds

Autopkgr can schedule a routine run to check recipes. This is often done at night after administrators leave the office. To configure, click on the schedule tab and then check the box for Enable scheduled AutoPkg runs. You can also choose to update your recipes from the repos by checking the “Update all recipes before each AutoPkg run” checkbox.


Getting Notified About New Updates To Packages

I know this sounds crazy. But people like to get notified when there’s a new thing showing up. To configure a variety of notification mechanisms, click on the Notifications tab in AutoPkgr.

Here, you can configure alerts via email, Slack, HipChat, macOS Notification Center, or via custom webhooks.


Integrating Autopkg with Jamf (and other supported vendors)

When integrating with another tool, you’ll need to first install the integration. To configure the JSSImporter, we’ll open the “Folders & Integrations” tab in Autopkgr and then click on the Install JSSImporter button.

Once installed, configure the URL, username and password (for Customer API access) and configure any distribution points that need to have the resultant packages copied to. 


Once the JSSImporter is configured, software should show up in Jamf Pro scoped to a new group upon each build.  It is then up to the Jamf Administrator to complete the scoping tasks so software shows up on end user devices.


What the JSSImporter Does from Autopkg

This option doesn’t seem to work at this time. Using the following may make it work:

sudo easy_install pip && pip install -I --user pyopenssl

Note: The above command may error if you’re using macOS Server. If so, call easy_install directly via 

/System/Library/Frameworks/Python.framework/Versions/2.7/Extras/lib/python/easy_install.py.

The post Getting Started with Autopkgr appeared first on krypted.com.

How to Use Lock Screen in MacOS High Sierra

Mac users have long been able to use various tricks to lock the screen of their computers, but with MacOS High Sierra 10.13.x onward, a simpler and faster option is now available on the Mac with an official Lock Screen feature. With the new Lock Screen feature, you can instantly lock down a Mac through … Read More

MacOS 10.13.4 Beta 2 Released for Testing

Apple has released the second beta build of macOS High Sierra 10.13.4 to Mac users participating in the beta testing program. The new beta build of macOS High Sierra presumably focuses on bug fixes and feature enhancements, though there are a few notable changes to the end user as well. For example, macOS 10.13.4 beta … Read More

How to Use diff to Compare Two Files at Mac Command Line

Need to quickly compare two files for differences? The command line ‘diff’ tool offers a great choice for users comfortable with the Terminal. Diff allows you to easily compare two files, with the command output reporting back any differences between the inputted files. The diff command is available by default on the Mac, and it … Read More

New MacBook Pro Release Still Scheduled For October [UPDATED]

Apple are allegedly still intending to release its new MacBook by the end of the month with the plan for shipments to start soon after the media release. This is according to information from Mac Otakara.

According to Mac Otakara, they have contacts with a ‘reliable Chinese Supplier’ with alleged information that Apple will launch new 13 and 15 inch models, continuing on the current size spectrum that they have within their Pro lineup. There is also a small amount of information regarding a new MacBook Air featuring USB C however this is sketchy as it would bring the new MacBook and the MacBook Air very close specification wise.

The new MacBook Pro would apparently replace the existing lineup, like in previous releases with the MacBook Air apparently having both USB – C ports and Thunderbolt 3, with very little mention of classic, traditional outputs such as HDMI or USB-A.

The new MacBook Pro however could have both USB C and USB A, however Apple are more likely to push towards their USB C output on their devices, such as was featured in the new MacBook. This would of course most likely remove the MagSafe connection which is unique to the MacBook’s and a key feature for some users.

As with any iteration of MacBook’s, it would most likely have a thinner body along with their new keyboard mechanism with the possibility of an OLED display touch panel at the top of the body to replace the normal function keys. This OLED panel would have, most likely, API’s allowing developers to program their apps to utilise it, such as Spotify Play/Pause functions.

MacBook Pro OLED

A sketchy rumour also suggests that their may be Touch ID integrated into the MacBook Pro to speed up both unlocking and security of individual files however this could have a number of usability problems.

Mac Otakara, has an interesting track record and the rumours shouldn’t be taken as 100% reliable however the October release date is something that is agreed with across a number of sources.

With no media invites sent out and not long before the end of October, do you think that Apple are going to release their new machines in time for Christmas. If so, what would you like to see most on these new models? Drop a comment below letting us know.

Update: According to Re/Code, the event will take place on the 27th.

The post New MacBook Pro Release Still Scheduled For October [UPDATED] appeared first on iJailbreak | Jailbreak And iOS News.

Forecast Bar Review

This really useful weather forecast utility sits in the menu bar, giving you an at-a-glance idea of the weather, unless you open it up for more detail. By default, what you get in the menu bar is the temperature and an icon showing you the prevailing weather type (sunshine, clouds, rain and so on), though you can customize this. Click this icon, though, and you open a full five-day forecast.

The next eight hours are shown in detail, with graphs covering temperature, chance of rain or heaviness of rain. The five days after that have icons and a bit of detail for each, along with high and low temperatures. It’s really well designed, accurate thanks to its use of the excellent Forecast.io system, and useful — pretty much the OS X version of Mac|Life-favorite iOS/Watch weather app Dark Sky. Lots about it can be personalized too — from new locations to get info on, to different iconography options and temperature scale customization.

The bottom line. It’s not the cheapest option, but this is a great-looking, useful, and customizable OS X weather utility.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

Forecast Bar

Company: 

Real Casual Games

Contact: 

Price: 

$5.99

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.9 or later, 64-bit processor

Positives: 

At-a-glance menu bar information. Great eight-hour graphs. Rain notifications.

Negatives: 

In-app purchases for more frequent updates.

Forecast Bar Review

This really useful weather forecast utility sits in the menu bar, giving you an at-a-glance idea of the weather, unless you open it up for more detail. By default, what you get in the menu bar is the temperature and an icon showing you the prevailing weather type (sunshine, clouds, rain and so on), though you can customize this. Click this icon, though, and you open a full five-day forecast.

The next eight hours are shown in detail, with graphs covering temperature, chance of rain or heaviness of rain. The five days after that have icons and a bit of detail for each, along with high and low temperatures. It’s really well designed, accurate thanks to its use of the excellent Forecast.io system, and useful — pretty much the OS X version of Mac|Life-favorite iOS/Watch weather app Dark Sky. Lots about it can be personalized too — from new locations to get info on, to different iconography options and temperature scale customization.

The bottom line. It’s not the cheapest option, but this is a great-looking, useful, and customizable OS X weather utility.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

Forecast Bar

Company: 

Real Casual Games

Contact: 

Price: 

$5.99

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.9 or later, 64-bit processor

Positives: 

At-a-glance menu bar information. Great eight-hour graphs. Rain notifications.

Negatives: 

In-app purchases for more frequent updates.

Boom 2 Review

Boom 2 is an application that intercepts your system audio and modifies it to squeeze more gain and clarity out of whatever sound you are playing. The idea is to make movies, music, conversations, or YouTube playback louder and clearer without having to add external speakers. If you do plug in external speakers, the application adapts itself to those as well. 

Boom 2 uses audio processing to achieve its aims: the same kind of processors that musicians might use in Logic or GarageBand, only here they’re mostly hidden from view. There’s a volume slider that shows the normal maximum volume and then the amount by which you can boost it, and an equalizer section complete with presets for different kinds of music or different uses. Each band can be adjusted and you can save your own presets. There are also effects, which include the ability to add “ambience” or “fidelity.” The EQ section also lets you fine-tune any particular movie or radio stream to get better bass or clearer vocals.

Boom 2 works in real time, but there’s also a section that lets you process batches of files using the current boost settings. You can use various audio and video file formats and it works by analyzing and processing the audio in the files then re-saving them. Whether you’d want to permanently re-process movies and music using the conversion option is maybe less clear — we probably wouldn’t. This is perhaps better for old recordings you have digitized as it basically provides you with the same set of tools you’d get in an audio wave processor, albeit with more basic controls. 

The bottom line. A good way to boost and fine-tune your Mac’s audio output for music and movies.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

Boom 2

Company: 

Global Delight

Price: 

$14.99

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.10, built-in audio hardware

Positives: 

Easy to use. Can work automatically. Manual control of EQ if you prefer.

Negatives: 

May not be wise to re-process music or movie files.

Curio Express Review

For nearly a decade, Zengobi’s Curio has been praised by users and critics alike as one of the best Mac notebook applications on the market. But not everyone is willing to spend $99.99 for such software, especially when there are so many free alternatives.

Curio Express appears to have been designed as a solution to this problem, slashing the cost by 70 percent but losing only one flagship feature in the process — the option to manage multiple pages (called “idea spaces”) within a single project. You can, however, create unlimited projects, so this won’t really be a limitation for students or home users, especially considering Express is otherwise the same as its sibling.

Although marketed as a notebook app, this version of the software is primarily a virtual whiteboard to help visualize new concepts, plans, or ideas. With built-in mind-mapping, outlining, and flowchart skills, Curio Express is capable of more than single-minded competitors can even dream of doing.

One of our favorite features is the ability to directly place content onto an idea space from an Evernote account, but the exhaustive list of other possibilities includes text, images, PDF files, Google Docs, web links, and embedded videos from YouTube or Vimeo — and that’s just for starters. In reality, just about anything can be dragged and dropped into Curio, which can even create automatic tables from CSV.

Although the exhaustive list of features are nearly the same as Curio, Express does have a handful of minor limitations due to Mac App Store sandboxing, such as the inability to open stored aliases created in the flagship application. Those accustomed to free productivity software from Google et al are likely to balk at paying even $30, but Express is an incredible value for the money.

Zengobi has also released Curio Reader, which allows anyone to view (but not edit) projects created in the full or Express versions. Likewise, the latter edition can be used in read-only mode for projects created with the former, which includes the option to view notebooks in presentation mode. One thing still missing: a companion iOS app, which feels like a glaring omission.

The bottom line. Curio Express loses little of its power or features en route to the Mac App Store, but your wallet will certainly notice the difference.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

Curio Express

Company: 

Zengobi

Contact: 

Price: 

$29.99

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.10 or later

Positives: 

Comprehensive notebook software for half the price. Includes nearly all features of $100 version.

Negatives: 

Only one “idea space” per project. Minor limitations due to Mac App Store sandboxing requirements.

Ghostnote Review

Ghostnote notes are context-aware, so you can apply them to a document, folder, or dozens of supported apps. The icon sits in your Mac’s menu bar; click on it while in an app or with a folder or document selected, and an empty note drops down. Text can be formatted, you can add tasks with tick boxes, note colors can be customized on a per-application basis, and can also be detached from the menu bar so they float on the desktop. In some apps, you can add notes to individual documents, and in Safari you can add them to specific websites.

It’s not always the most intuitive app. By default, the feature which allows you to add notes to documents and folders isn’t active. To add support, you must click on the Ghostnote menu bar item, click the gear wheel and choose Install Document Support. You’re then asked to open a folder, though which folder isn’t specified and no feedback given. On the plus side, icons at the bottom of notes means your never in doubt about what each note is attached to.

The bottom line. Anyone who writes on scraps of paper will find this useful.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

Ghostnote

Company: 

Thomas Peterson

Price: 

$9.99

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.9 or later, 64-bit processor

Positives: 

Can add notes to documents without cluttering your Mac. Notes are customizable. Can export notes.

Negatives: 

Takes a bit of figuring out.

CleanMyMac 3 Review

The third iteration of MacPaw’s self-descriptive cleaner is here, and it includes a number of improvements and new features. There’s a new menu bar icon offer convenient access to the main program as well as a quick summary of drive space, memory and Trash. The main interface gains an optional dashboard view offering a more detailed breakdown of key stats.

The program includes six cleaning tools and five utilities — four of which are new (Mail Attachments, iTunes Junk, Maintenance, and Privacy). We like the new Maintenance tool’s promise to fix various application errors as well as optimize disk and search index. While this version does a better job of providing explanatory notes for each cleaning tool, it still doesn’t make it mandatory that you at least review what it’s found before going further. This is especially important considering no fail-safe mechanisms are provided.

CleanMyMac 3 is a slick, fast app that will clean your Mac. Ultimately, though, the continued lack of undo or backup protection makes it hard to recommend to its target audience: less experienced users who just want a simple and safe tool.

The bottom line. CleanMyMac gets the job done — sadly, though, in many ways it’s too efficient.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

CleanMyMac 3

Company: 

MacPaw

Contact: 

Price: 

$39.95 ($20 upgrade)

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.8 or higher, 40MB HDD space

Positives: 

New modules add cleaning power. Slick UI offers more explanation.

Negatives: 

No built-in fail-safes. Tools available elsewhere for free.

F.lux for Mac Adds “Backwards Alarm Clock” to Show How Much Sleep You’re Missing

Mac: F.lux is a great app for changing the temperature of your display when you’re working late at night , but working late at night also tends to mean you’re skipping sleep. The Mac version of the app now has a new “Backwards alarm clock” that counts down the time until your alarm goes off. http://lifehacker.com/5899079/how-ca…

Read more…



SmartDown Review

SmartDown is a full-featured Markdown text editor with syntax highlighting and HTML previewing, offering export to RTF, HTML, and PDF. Plain Markdown is supported, along with MultiMarkdown for things like tables, and Critic Markup for tracking changes. Light/dark themes are available, as well as your own; every aspect of syntax highlighting is customizable, and you can add your own CSS for Markdown preview.

Writers are well served, with statistics on words, sentences, pages, and reading time; you can even specify a word-count goal, and SmartDown will show your progress. It takes Markdown syntax into account when counting words, and it offers a Highlight Mode, where all but the current sentence or paragraph is dimmed. You can also do basic outlining in your Markdown file. Headings can be collapsed/expanded, using arrows in the document gutter, and there’s a floating tooltip marking the section. You can even export your work as an OPML file.

There are some handy editing tools, like shortcuts to move lines and a right-click palette of Markdown-insertion options. 

The bottom line. SmartDown is ideal for planning, organizing and writing documents in Markdown. Extensive customization options add to the appeal.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

SmartDown

Company: 

Neomobili

Price: 

$19.99

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.9 or later

Positives: 

Completely customizable Markdown syntax highlighting and previewing. Outlining, with collapsible headings and OPML export. Useful statistics, goals, and tools for writers.

Negatives: 

Some rough edges in interface and keyboard shortcut support.

Lightroom 6 Review

Lightroom is Adobe’s professional photo enhancing and cataloging program, and it’s designed to be used alongside a regular image-editor like Photoshop. Indeed, if you buy it using the Creative Cloud subscription option instead of a one-off fee, you’ll get Photoshop as well. Lightroom’s editing tools don’t reach the same depths as Photoshop’s, but it’s aimed at a slightly different target — simpler non-destructive improvements to photos, rather than full editing of images with lots of layers.

Adobe has introduced new tools for organizing photos in Lightroom 6, but the main additions are to the editing tools. There are also exciting new panorama and HDR tools, and it’s now possible to “brush out” areas adjusted with the Graduated and Radial filter tools. Lightroom 6 also introduces face recognition, and comes with new HTML5 web galleries and a major upgrade to the Slideshow tools.

Blending several images to make an HDR composite is simple. There are options for “deghosting,” if you have objects moving between the frames, such as leaves and branches, or passersby. It can take a minute or so to blend the images, eventually producing a realistic image with the shadows and highlights intact but without unrealistic tonal compression or flattened contrast. Panaroma merges follow a similar process and result in seamless compositions.

It’s now possible to manually mask out areas modified by the Gradient and Radial Filters; sometimes you’ll have buildings or other objects jutting out into a darkened sky — and you don’t want these objects darkened by the Gradient Filter. It’s also now possible to move the “pins” created by the Adjustment Brush.

It’s a little odd to find face detection and recognition tools in a professional image cataloging application, but it will appeal to those who used the feature in Aperture or iPhoto. At first, Lightroom can still identify unique faces and group them together, but you have to tell it who these people are. The more you use it, though, the more it’s able to suggest names automatically.

There are many other small improvements and additions too, and it all adds up to make Lightroom a great next step for people moving on from Aperture, or upgrading from iPhoto/Photos.

The bottom line. If you’re a photo enthusiast, expert or professional, you need software which can organize, output and enhance your pictures; with a few minor quibbles, Lightroom is the best choice.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

Lightroom 6

Company: 

Adobe

Contact: 

Price: 

$149 or $9.99/month (Creative Cloud)

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.8 or later, 64-bit processor

Positives: 

Powerful cataloging and searching tools. New HDR and Panorama merging. Powerful non-destructive editing.

Negatives: 

Subscription needed for Cloud options.

Photoflow for Mac Is a Beautiful Desktop Client for Instagram

OS X: If you’re an Instagram junkie, love following photographers, exploring hashtags and photos in your area, or just have lots of friends or followers on the service, Photoflow for Mac might be worth its price tag for you. You get most the features of the mobile apps or web site, and some additional ones you may not be expecting.

Read more…



PowerPhotos Review

With the release of OS X Yosemite 10.10.3, Apple’s venerable iPhoto and Aperture are essentially dead and buried, replaced by a more efficient, iOS-like, iCloud-connected solution. Unfortunately, the built-in Photos application does little to eliminate some of iPhoto’s long-standing limitations, such as managing more than one image library.

Thankfully, Fat Cat Software comes to the rescue with PowerPhotos, a third-party companion to help create, organize, duplicate, and even search between multiple libraries. While it appears to work directly on libraries, PowerPhotos actually works in conjunction with Photos, launching or quitting the main application as needed.

Essentially the next generation of Fat Cat’s insanely handy iPhoto Library Manager, PowerPhotos offers a better way to view basic metadata without having to summon Photos’ pesky Info window, and you can quickly hop between different libraries by selecting one in the sidebar. There’s a convenient list view to sort or display photos by date, file name, keyword, and other criteria without thumbnails slowing down the process.

As the name implies, PowerPhotos only works with new or migrated Photos libraries. The software streamlines the migration process for existing iPhoto or Aperture libraries by reducing it to a few clicks of the mouse, rather than having to open each one manually.

PowerPhotos can also be used to identify duplicates hiding inside a photo library, with full control over how such copies will be dealt with. By default, the software marks a single keeper, but unchecking this option offers more granular control over intentional duplicates, such as variant photos that have had filters or other effects applied outside of Photos.

After clicking apply, duplicates are placed in a new album, from where they can be deleted or have a keyword assigned to them instead. Purging dupes worked like a charm on migrated Aperture libraries, with the exception, oddly enough, of our main iCloud Photo Library – PowerPhotos appeared to go through the motions, but completed with an error despite creating a duplicates folder without any actual photos inside.

PowerPhotos is also currently missing some of iPhoto Library Manager’s more advanced features, such as the ability to merge, rebuild, and copy photos between libraries. As a result, PowerPhotos is free for new and existing iPhoto Library Manager 4 owners, but hopefully the developer will find a way to restore this missing functionality in a future update.

The bottom line. PowerPhotos may lack the punch of its predecessor, but it’s indispensable for those making the transition to Photos.

Review Synopsis

Product: 

PowerPhotos 1.0.2

Company: 

Fat Cat Software

Price: 

$19.95

Requirements: 

Mac running OS X 10.10.3 or later; Intel Core 2 Duo processor or better

Positives: 

Manage multiple Photos libraries. Find and remove duplicate images.

Negatives: 

Missing advanced functionality of iPhoto Library Manager. Find duplicates failed to remove images from iCloud Photo Library.

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