Get 15% off site-wide in eBay’s mobile app flash sale

Heads up shoppers, eBay is hosting another one of its infamous flash sales. Until 8PM (EST) tonight, you can get 15% off just about everything on the website via the retailers mobile app. So if you’re doing some early holiday shopping, or have had your eye on something for yourself, now is the perfect time to buy.

Heads up shoppers, eBay is hosting another one of its infamous flash sales. Until 8PM (EST) tonight, you can get 15% off just about everything on the website via the retailers mobile app. So if you’re doing some early holiday shopping, or have had your eye on something for yourself, now is the perfect time to buy.... Read the rest of this post here


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Google Assistant iOS update lets you say ’Hey Siri, OK Google’

Apple probably didn’t intend to let competitors take advantage of Siri Shortcuts this way, but you can now launch Google Assistant on your iPhone by saying “Hey Siri, OK Google” . But don’t expect a flawless experience — it takes multiple steps. After updating the Google Assistant app on iOS, you need to open the […]

Apple probably didn’t intend to let competitors take advantage of Siri Shortcuts this way, but you can now launch Google Assistant on your iPhone by saying “Hey Siri, OK Google” .

But don’t expect a flawless experience — it takes multiple steps. After updating the Google Assistant app on iOS, you need to open the app to set up a new Siri Shortcut for Google Assistant.

As the name suggests, Siri Shortcuts lets you record custom phrases to launch specific apps or features. For instance, you can create Siri Shortcuts to play your favorite playlist, launch directions to a specific place, text someone and more. If you want to chain multiple actions together, you can even create complicated algorithms using Apple’s Shortcuts app.

By default, Google suggests the phrase “OK Google”. You can choose something shorter, or “Hey Google” for instance. After setting that up, you can summon Siri and use this custom phrase to launch Google’s app.

You may need to unlock your iPhone or iPad to let iOS open the app. The Google Assistant app then automatically listens to your query. Again, you need to pause and wait for the app to appear before saying your query.

This is quite a cumbersome walk-around and I’m not sure many people are going to use it. But the fact that “Hey Siri, OK Google” exists is still very funny.

On another note, Google Assistant is still the worst when it comes to your privacy. The app pushes you to enable “web & app activity”, the infamous all-encompassing privacy destroyer. If you activate that setting, Google will collect your search history, your Chrome browsing history, your location, your credit card purchases and more.

It’s a great example of dark pattern design. If you haven’t enabled web & app activity, there’s a flashy blue banner at the bottom of the app that tells you that you can “unlock more Assistant features”.

When you tap it, you get a cute little animated drawing to distract you from the text. There’s only one button that says “More”. If you tap it, the “More” button becomes “Turn on” — many people are not even going to see “No thanks” on the bottom left.

It’s a classic persuasion method. If somebody asks you multiple questions and you say yes every time, you’ll tend to say yes to the last question even if you don’t agree with it. You tapped on “Get started” and “More” so you want to tap on the same button one more time. If you say no, Google asks you one more time if you’re 100 percent sure.

So make sure you read everything and you understand that you’re making a privacy tradeoff by using Google Assistant.

10 cool things you can do with Automator on Mac

If you want to automate some tasks on your Mac, there are 10 awesome things to try and this Mac Automator tutorial shows you how.

The Automator tool on Mac might be intimidating to some users, but it can be a very handy app. You can create automated workflows, actions, or applications that help you perform tedious tasks. Along with that, there are some tasks you can do with it that are just plain neat.

Here are 10 cool things you can do with Mac Automator.... Read the rest of this post here


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Drone.io, Packet team on free continuous delivery service for open source developers

Drone.io, makers of the open source Drone continuous integration/continuous delivery tool (CI/CD), announced Drone Cloud today, a new CI/CD cloud service that it’s making available for free to open source projects. The company is teaming with Packet, which is offering to run the service for free on its servers. Drone.io co-founder Brad Rydzewski says his […]

Drone.io, makers of the open source Drone continuous integration/continuous delivery tool (CI/CD), announced Drone Cloud today, a new CI/CD cloud service that it’s making available for free to open source projects. The company is teaming with Packet, which is offering to run the service for free on its servers.

Drone.io co-founder Brad Rydzewski says his company is “a container-native continuous delivery platform, and its goal is to help automate the developer workflow from testing to release.” Continuous delivery is an approach built on cloud-native, the idea that you can manage cloud and on prem with single set of management tools. From a developer standpoint, it relies on containers as a way to continuously deliver application updates as changes happen.

As part of that approach, the newly announced Drone Cloud provides a publicly hosted CI/CD cloud offering. “It’s free for the open source community. So it’s an open source only offering. There’s no paid plan, and it’s only available to public Github repositories,” Rydzewski explained.

Rydzewski says the service was born out of a need for his own project. He found it hard to find publicly-hosted solutions that offered a way to test a variety of operating systems and chip architectures. “It’s really something we needed for ourselves. The Drone community wanted to run Drone on Windows on Arm 64 processors. We actually had no way to build and test the software on these platforms because there was just no publicly-hosted solution that we could use,” he explained.

When they decided to build this solution for themselves, they figured it was going to be useful to other open source projects that also want to ship and support multiple operating systems and architectures. They got Packet on board to offer the infrastructure.

Packet offers a variety of server options with different operating systems and chips, and Rydzewski says this was an important consideration for the open source developers who will take advantage of this service. Packet is making the latest Intel Xeon Scalable, AMD EPYC and Arm-based servers available to users of the Drone Cloud service for free as part of a multi-year donation to support the project.

“As open source software is deployed to increasingly diverse environments, from traditional data centers to cars and even drones, the need for multi-architecture builds has exploded,” Jacob Smith, co-founder and CMO at Packet said in a statement. This is Packet’s way of supporting that effort.

Drone does not intend to establish a paid layer for Drone Cloud, according to Rydzewski, but he hopes it shows what Drone can do, which in turn could attract some developers to the paid version of the product. In addition to supporting the open source version, the company offers a paid version that can be installed on premises as a part of a private cloud-native development environment.