Microsoft Gives Outlook.com a Dark Mode

Microsoft has finally added a Dark Mode to Outlook.com. This, according to the company, has been one of the most requested features for a long time, and Microsoft has finally seen fit to grant Outlook.com users their ultimate wish. An increasing number of websites and apps are offering dark modes these days. Including Windows 10, which has its own Dark Mode you can set to toggle on and off automatically. And now Microsoft has added a Dark Mode to Outlook.com as well. Looking at Outlook.com at Night In a post on Outlook Feedback by UserVoice, a Microsoft representative explains that…

Read the full article: Microsoft Gives Outlook.com a Dark Mode

Microsoft has finally added a Dark Mode to Outlook.com. This, according to the company, has been one of the most requested features for a long time, and Microsoft has finally seen fit to grant Outlook.com users their ultimate wish.

An increasing number of websites and apps are offering dark modes these days. Including Windows 10, which has its own Dark Mode you can set to toggle on and off automatically. And now Microsoft has added a Dark Mode to Outlook.com as well.

Looking at Outlook.com at Night

In a post on Outlook Feedback by UserVoice, a Microsoft representative explains that the new Dark Mode is a “more-pleasant way to read your Outlook.com email if you prefer interfaces that are less bright or if you are in a low-light environment.”

Outlook.com’s Dark Mode is only available on the new Outlook.com experience (formerly known as the Outlook Beta). It also only supports the default blue theme right now, although Microsoft hopes to make it compatible with the other themes as well.

To turn on Dark Mode, click the Gear icon in the top right-hand corner of Outlook.com. This opens the Quick Settings panel, and the option to enable Dark Mode should be near the top. Toggle the slider across, and your display should change from light to dark.

The science backing the need for dark modes is undeniable at this point. And with other websites and apps (including YouTube on Android and iOS) starting to offer dark modes en masse, Microsoft had little choice but to follow suit.

Dark Modes Aren’t for Everyone

Microsoft’s new Dark Mode for Outlook.com won’t be for everyone. Because dark modes in general aren’t for everyone. I personally don’t like looking at light text on dark backgrounds, even though science tells us this setup puts less strain on our eyes.

Read the full article: Microsoft Gives Outlook.com a Dark Mode

How to downgrade Snapchat to version 10.22.2 or below (old layout)

Snapchat’s latest version bungles up a lot of stuff, which is why many users have abandoned the app. Here’s how you can download the older version of Snapchat on your iPhone on iOS 10 and 11. Why should you go back to the older version of S…

Snapchat’s latest version bungles up a lot of stuff, which is why many users have abandoned the app. Here’s how you can download the older version of Snapchat on your iPhone on iOS 10 and 11. Why should you go back to the older version of Snapchat? Admit it, the good old Snapchat layout is gone for good and isn’t coming back. The latest version, on the other hand, is an absolute freak show and fills your feed with all kinds of crap. This is why a lot of users are flocking back to older versions, and rightfully so. Here’s

The post How to downgrade Snapchat to version 10.22.2 or below (old layout) appeared first on Yalu Jailbreak.

Facebook sees mixed Q2 earnings with slowest-ever growth, stock tanks

Facebook has hit a wall. The social network succumbed to the public backlash over its handling of fake news, privacy, and digital wellbeing to miss some of Wall Street’s estimates, showing mixed results in its Q2 2018 earnings. GDPR, Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before congress, and more scandals appear to have contributed to Facebook’s weak user […]

Facebook has hit a wall. The social network succumbed to the public backlash over its handling of fake news, privacy, and digital wellbeing to miss some of Wall Street’s estimates, showing mixed results in its Q2 2018 earnings. GDPR, Mark Zuckerberg’s testimony before congress, and more scandals appear to have contributed to Facebook’s weak user growth.

Facebook reached 2.23 billion monthly users, up just 1.54 percent, much slower than Q1’s 3.14 percent around where its growth rate has hovered for years. Facebook earned $13.23 billion in revenue, missing Thomson Reuters consensus estimates of $13.36 billion, but beat with $1.74 EPS compared to an estimated $1.72 EPS.

Daily active users hit 1.47 billion, up an especially low 1.44 percent percent compared to Q1’s 3.42 percent. For comparison, before now Facebook’s slowest quarter-over-quarter daily user growth rate was 2.18 percent in Q4 2017.

The stock market frowned heavily on the slow growth rates, pushing Facebook’s share price down over 7.5 percent in after-hours trading to around $200 per share. That’s down from $217.50 when the markets closed, but up from an immediate drop to $198 when the brutal earnings report was released.

The share price descent comes despite Facebook earning $5.106 billion in profit and revenue being up 42 percent year-over-year. Zuckerberg noted in the earnings release that “Our community and business continue to grow quickly”. And while that’s true if you’re looking year-over-year, Q2 could break that trend.

Facebook’s daily and monthly user counts were up 11 percent year-over-year, confirming that the momentum of its business is still overpowering its PR problems when you zoom out. And its DAU to MAU ratio held firm at 66 pecent, indicating that users are still visiting the site often. But the question for today’s earnings call will be whether time spent on the site has decreased significantly, dragging down revenue with it.

One tough spot for Facebook was that it got stuck at 241 million monthly US & Canada users, the same count as last quarter. After failing to grow in that core market in Q4 2017, it appears that Facebook finally has hit saturation at home after 14 years. And in Europe, Facebook lost 1 million users, sinking to 376 million monthlies. That could be sign that GDPR requirements and the annoying terms of service changes it had to get users to agree to deterred some from browsing.

Facebook still managed to boost its average revenue per user in all markets, growing from $23.59 to $25.91 in the US & Canada, showing its targeting continues to improve and competition for ads is strong. But the fact that it’s stopped growing at home could way heavily on its share price. Facebook will have to continue to invent more ways to squeeze dollars out of its existing users.

The quarter saw Facebook clamp down on APIs for developers in hopes of preventing another Cambridge Analytica style disaster. Its CEO faced tough days of questioning from congress over the privacy problem, alleged bias against conservatives, and its failure to protect the 2016 presidential election. Facebook has faced tough questioning from reporters about its approach to fake news and election interference. Facebook tried to redirect attention away from its troubles during its F8 conference that saw it announce plans for a dating feature.

But all the problems may be taking a toll on user engagement, leading to the revenue miss. Weak daily and monthly user growth should be a big concern, and will put even more pressure on Instagram to prop up the corporation.

For more recent Facebook news:

Google launches “Shielded VMs” to protect cloud servers from rootkits, data theft

New features lock down VMs, verifying security at boot—and preventing hostile snapshot “migration.”

Enlarge (credit: Donald Iain Smith / Getty Images)

This week, Google is rolling out a number of new cloud security technologies aimed at making the public cloud a safer place. Among them is Shielded VMs, a feature of Google Cloud Platform that protects virtual machines from the installation of rootkits and other persistent malware, as well as other attacks that could result in data theft.

Using a cryptographically protected baseline measurement of the VM's image, the Shielded VMs feature—launched in beta today—provides a way of "tamper-proofing" virtual machines and alerting their owners to changes in their runtime state. Shielded VMs also make it possible to prevent a virtual machine from being booted in a different context than it was originally deployed in—in other words, preventing theft of VMs through "snap-shotting" or other duplication.

Virtually secure

Major cloud providers have been trying to blunt threats to virtual machines and cloud application containers in a number of ways—with hardened operating system images for virtual machines and with "confidential computing" models that prevent compromises of the underlying machine's operating system from providing access, for instance.

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8 Awesome CodePen Features for Programming and Web Development

codepen-features

Getting started with JavaScript web development can be a frustrating process, but there are tools out there which make it easier. CodePen.io is an in-browser coding environment designed for both learning to code and to quickly prototype ideas with minimal hassle. In this article, we look at some of the site’s features and how they can help you become a better programmer. What Is CodePen? CodePen provides something called a pen, which comprises three different windows for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, plus a preview pane that updates in real-time as you type. While it is frequently used for web developers…

Read the full article: 8 Awesome CodePen Features for Programming and Web Development

codepen-features

Getting started with JavaScript web development can be a frustrating process, but there are tools out there which make it easier.

CodePen.io is an in-browser coding environment designed for both learning to code and to quickly prototype ideas with minimal hassle.

In this article, we look at some of the site’s features and how they can help you become a better programmer.

What Is CodePen?

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

CodePen provides something called a pen, which comprises three different windows for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, plus a preview pane that updates in real-time as you type.

While it is frequently used for web developers to showcase ideas for websites, it is also a great place to learn the basics of front-end web development. Here are the most notable features you need to know when using CodePen.

1. Preprocessors

Preprocessors are interpreted or compiled languages designed to simplify coding. They can add features to a language for convenience, and make code easier to read. In web development, a combination of preprocessors for HTML, CSS, and JavaScript are used to create clean code quickly.

If you are learning web development and want to try out different preprocessors, CodePen allows you to switch preprocessors on the fly, and see the code it compiles down to in real time. Each of the three panes on the CodePen app has a dropdown menu in the top right. Select View Compiled HTML/CSS/JS to see how the code will be interpreted.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

In this pen, we’ve created a simple site using Haml and Sass to style some header text. Selecting View Compiled shows the standard HTML and CSS. In this example the difference is minimal. While learning a new language, however, it can be useful to see how the preprocessed code looks once compiled.

2. External Resources

Alongside native support for preprocessors, CodePen supports external scripts. This makes it the perfect place to get hands-on experience with libraries for your personal projects, or to brush up on popular web app libraries like React.

To add an external library, open the Settings pane on your pen, and head to the JavaScript tab. There are two ways to add resources, either by adding the resource URL manually, or by searching.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

We used this feature in our article covering web animation with mo.js, along with Babel preprocessing.

See the Pen Mojs MUO example by Ian (@Bardoctorus) on CodePen.

Yes, CodePen pens can be embedded! Go ahead and click on the preview pane above to see the results of the Mo.js tutorial!

Other pens can be imported much like external libraries. This means you can take elements from previously written pens to use like modules in your new pens. CodePen user Adam’s Simple Poll pen is a good example of this.

3. Templates

When you are learning new concepts or testing out new ideas, you frequently use similar components and retread the same steps getting started. CodePen allows the creation of template pens which can cut out the repetition, and let you get straight to the point.

To create a template, open a new pen, make your changes, and select the Template slider in the settings menu.

Until recently, free users could only make three templates, but now all users can have as many templates in their account as they want. Perfect for getting started on a new idea with the minimum delay!

4. Collaboration Mode

The ability to collaborate and teach with CodePen may be its greatest asset. There are already a wealth of great collaboration tools for programmers, but CodePen’s approach is simple and intuitive.

Pro users of CodePen can create a new pen, and open it to collaboration under the Change View menu. This changes the pen’s link into a shareable invitation accommodating a scaling number of people depending on your CodePen Pro plan.

In this instance, I wrote HTML while a friend updated the CSS in real-time, with a labelled cursor identified where they were working.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

Anyone with the link can join and use the in-browser chat function, regardless of whether they are a pro user or even have a CodePen account. Provided autosave is off only the owner of the pen can save any changes, making it a safe way to open your code to others without risk.

The open-ended nature of this mode is beneficial for beginners as you can invite almost anyone into your pen to guide you through a difficult concept. It is also a handy mode to know your way around as it is perfect for interviewing potential employees, and has already been used professionally in this way!

5. Professor Mode

Professor mode allows one Pro user to host a room in which only they can edit the code. Between 10-100 users can watch and chat depending on the Pro plan of the host.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

The Professor mode allows flexibility between classroom learning and distance learning, or a combination of the two. Using Professor mode will enable people at the back of the class to have the same experience of those at the front, and for the teacher to show bugfixes which will update in real time.

6. Presentation Mode

Presentation mode is designed, unsurprisingly, with presenting code in mind. The app displays in a simplified view, designed to work with overhead projectors. CodePen has optimized Presentation mode for use on lower speed internet connections and weaker hardware.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

Shrewd readers may have already realized that the free version of CodePen would provide precisely this function, though the Pro mode does have a few useful features. Layout, font size, and themes can be quickly changed on the fly to suit almost any setting, and showing the link to the pen brings up a jumbo-sized shortened URL making sharing the project easier.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

These small changes, along with being able to scale the preview window to fit whatever you are showing off, make presentation mode perfect for both teachers, and developers presenting ideas to colleagues. Presentation mode is also a clean-looking, and simple way to present code if you find yourself interviewing for a programming position.

7. Patterns

Searching for inspiration is made much easier with CodePen’s collections of Design Patterns.

Each category is a collection of example code provided by CodePen users for specific tasks. Are you looking for a way to create dynamic buttons for your site? Accordioning menus? There are a wealth of categories to fit almost any example.

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

These patterns are also a great way to learn how interactive buttons work, and the different ways dynamic user interfaces can function.

8. Emmet

Emmet, previously known as Zen Coding, is widely regarded as the greatest time saver for HTML and CSS development. The plugin takes some of the code you find yourself writing a lot and converts them into simple shortcuts.

Seeing it in action is better than explaining it, so take the usual setup for an HTML document:

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

Adding this to every HTML document has been reduced to two actions. Using Emmet, type ! and hit the Tab key. Magic!

These CodePen features will help you improve your coding

Emmet is active as standard on CodePen and is especially useful if you are trying to learn a new concept in JavaScript and need to create the supporting HTML and CSS quickly.

Develop With CodePen for a Better Experience

CodePen is an excellent tool for web developers, and the field is continuously growing. JavaScript is a great language to learn for a future in web development.

There are some great tutorials and courses available for people wanting to get started with JavaScript, and CodePen is a great environment to test out your new skills.

Read the full article: 8 Awesome CodePen Features for Programming and Web Development

How to use emoji and Tapbacks in iMessage on iPhone and iPad

How do you emoji recommendations, emoji reactions, and emojifications? It’s all in the Messages app!

Messages make using emoji easier than ever. If that doesn’t sound important to you, then you haven’t seen the kind of cheers emoji get on stage or the amount of interest they generate on social platforms. They’re a big, smiley, thumbs-up kind of deal!

If you’re looking to spice up your messages to your friends and family, you can litter them with emoji all you want! Here’s how you do it!

How do you get emoji recommendations in iMessage?
How do you emojify an iMessage?
How do you react with an emoji Tapback in iMessage?
What do the Tapback emoji reactions mean?
How do you change the emoji reaction Tapback in iMessage?
How do you delete the emoji reaction Tapback in iMessage?

How do you get emoji recommendations in iMessage?

Apple’s predictive QuickType keyboard can suggest emoji as well as, you know, regular words. The predictive keyboard has to be turned on in Settings, and can’…

How do you emoji recommendations, emoji reactions, and emojifications? It's all in the Messages app!

Messages make using emoji easier than ever. If that doesn't sound important to you, then you haven't seen the kind of cheers emoji get on stage or the amount of interest they generate on social platforms. They're a big, smiley, thumbs-up kind of deal!

If you're looking to spice up your messages to your friends and family, you can litter them with emoji all you want! Here's how you do it!

How do you get emoji recommendations in iMessage?

Apple's predictive QuickType keyboard can suggest emoji as well as, you know, regular words. The predictive keyboard has to be turned on in Settings, and can't be hidden.

  1. Start typing in the iMessage text field.
  2. Tap any emoji predictions that show up in the prediction bar. If multiple predictions show up, tap the one you prefer.
  3. Tap the Send button. (Looks like an upward arrow)

Emoji predictions will show up whenever you type something that has a corresponding emoji. For example, "I'm happy" will predict "[smiley face]". "My car" will suggest the "[car]" emoji.

Pro tip: If you don't want the emoji to take the place of the word, but rather appear beside it, put a space between the word before you tap your desired emoji.

How do you emojify an iMessage?

The "emojification" works similarly to emoji recommendations.

  1. Type an iMessage in the text field.
  2. Tap the Emoji button on the keyboard.

  3. Tap on a word that's highlighted orange to replace it with its corresponding emoji.
  4. Keep tapping words highlighted until you've "emojified" everything you want.
  5. Tap the Send button (Looks like an upward arrow).

With emojification, you can convert as many — or as few — words to emoji as you like.

How do you react with an emoji Tapback in iMessage?

Emoji aren't just for replying, they're also for reacting. Apple calls them Tapbacks. They're similar to Slack or Facebook emoji reactions, and drop right onto any iMessage bubble sent your way.

  1. Touch and hold (long press) on an iMessage sent your way.
  2. Tap the Tapback you want to send: Heart, thumbs up, thumbs down, Ha ha, !!, or ?.

There's no need to hit send, the emoji reaction goes immediately.

What do the Tapback emoji reactions mean?

Theoretically, these Tapback reactions can mean whatever you want them too. Context is king and a thumbs up Tapback to your Mom might mean something different than one to your best friend. Here's a basic guide to all the Tapback emoji that are available and what they could mean.

  • Heart: Like, love, or fav
  • Thumbs up: Happy, approve, or agree
  • Thumbs down: Sad, disapprove, or disagree
  • Ha ha: Laugh, either happily or sarcastically.
  • !!: Exclaim emphatically.
  • ?: Question.

How do you change the emoji reaction Tapback in iMessage?

If you reply with the wrong Tapback, or you later decide you want a different Tapback, you can easily make the change.

  1. Touch and hold (long press) on an iMessage with the Tapback you want to change.
  2. Tap the Tapback you want to change to: Heart, thumbs up, thumbs down, Ha ha, !, or ?.

The new Tapback will take the place of the old one.

How do you delete the emoji reaction Tapback in iMessage?

If you accidentally send a Tapback, or have simply reconsider sending one, you can also remove it.

  1. Tap a Tapback that you wish to remove.
  2. Tap the Tapback you want to remove (i.e. if you want to remove Heart, tap Heart.)

The Tapback will disappear.

Any Questions?

Let us know in the comments below!

Updated July 2018: Updated to ensure all steps are the same in iOS 12.

Facebook: Everything you need to know!

Curious about the world’s favorite social networking site? Learn all you need to know about Facebook here!

Pretty much everyone has a Facebook account. Grandmas, middle schoolers, celebrities, fast food restaurants — you name ’em, and I can say with at least 85% certainty that you’ll be able to find them on Facebook. However, maybe you’ve just emerged from some sort of self-imposed Walden forest isolation scenario and are extremely confused about this whole Facebook business. Or maybe you’re just a casual user who wants to know how to better utilize the site so you can get the full Facebook experience. Either way, fear not: we’ve got you covered.

What’s new with Facebook?

Check back here for the latest updates in Facebook news.

July 25, 2018 – Facebook’s Watch Party lets you watch videos with your friends

Ever wish you could enjoy a video with your friend group in real time without having to actually be in the same room? Well round up the gang (virtually), because t…

Curious about the world's favorite social networking site? Learn all you need to know about Facebook here!

Pretty much everyone has a Facebook account. Grandmas, middle schoolers, celebrities, fast food restaurants — you name 'em, and I can say with at least 85% certainty that you'll be able to find them on Facebook. However, maybe you've just emerged from some sort of self-imposed Walden forest isolation scenario and are extremely confused about this whole Facebook business. Or maybe you're just a casual user who wants to know how to better utilize the site so you can get the full Facebook experience. Either way, fear not: we've got you covered.

What's new with Facebook?

Check back here for the latest updates in Facebook news.

July 25, 2018 - Facebook's Watch Party lets you watch videos with your friends

Ever wish you could enjoy a video with your friend group in real time without having to actually be in the same room? Well round up the gang (virtually), because thanks to Facebook's new feature, now you can.

Called Watch Party, the feature was revealed back in May, and allows members of Facebook groups to watch and interact with videos together. Here's an overview, according to FB's newsroom post:

Watch Party is a new way for people to watch videos on Facebook together in real time. Once a Watch Party is started, participants can watch videos, live or recorded, and interact with one another around them in the same moment. We've been focused on building new ways to bring people together around video, create connections, and ignite conversations; Watch Party is the next step in bringing this vision to life.

Facebook emphasized how Watch Party can benefit Groups both large and small, and can be used for everything from hosting Q&As and workshops to sharing a loved one's graduation video to just hanging out and going on a cat video spree with your friends.

The social media giant also noted that it's currently testing the Watch Party feature outside of groups as well and is exploring the idea of Watch Parties for Pages, but there's no word yet on if and when it will be widely available for the public. For now, the feature is strictly Groups-centric.

If you'd like to test out Watch Party for yourself, FB is hosting a Weekend of Watch Parties to celebrate the feature's launch. From July 27 to July 29, Facebook Groups worldwide (like Buzzfeed's Tasty Group and Outdoor Afro) will host Watch Parties to connect their communities. Check out FB's original post for a more exhaustive list of the Groups participating.

What is Facebook?

Facebook is a newsfeed-based social media networking platform used predominantly for sharing general life updates, photos, videos and links with friends. It was first launched in 2004 by creator Mark Zuckerberg and his fellow Harvard students Eduardo Saverin, Andrew McCollum, Dustin Moskovitz and Chris Hughes. Initially, it was designed as a way for Harvard kids to connect with one another. However, it soon expanded to other universities and beyond, and by 2006, as long as you claimed to be 13 years old you could sign up to become the proud owner of a Facebook account. Currently, Facebook has about 2 billion users.

How does it work?

You can sign up for a Facebook account right on Facebook's homepage. Once you've input your information and confirmed your age, Facebook will prompt you to "Find Your Friends." You can do that by allowing Facebook access to your contacts, or you can skip that step and search for your friends by name. I'd advise fleshing out your profile a bit before you do this so the people you'd like to add as a friend will recognize you. Once you've sufficiently filled in your profile and added some friends, you can start posting photos, text, videos, links and pretty much whatever else your heart desires. You can also choose to post things to your friends' pages (referred to as their "timelines"). When you post to a timeline, whether it be your own or a friend's, whatever you've posted will appear in your friends' news feeds.

What's a news feed?

Facebook describes the news feed best:

[Your] News Feed is the constantly updating list of stories in the middle of your home page. News Feed includes status updates, photos, videos, links, app activity and likes from people, pages and groups that you follow on Facebook.

Facebook chooses what stories to show you in your news feed based on your friends and activity. Ideally, this means that you'll end up seeing more stories about things that interest you from groups and friends you interact with the most. The hotter a particular photo or post in your news feed is (i.e., the more comments and likes it gets), the more likely it is that it'll show up toward the top of your news feed.

Though news feed is roughly chronological, that doesn't necessarily mean that you'll see the newest posts first, so if you feel like you're missing out on something you can adjust your settings to better prioritize the content you want. If you feel the need to do that, you can follow Facebook's tutorial here.

What devices can I use to access Facebook?

Pretty much all of them. Smartphones, desktop computers, tablets — as long as it isn't a single-function calculator, it's a pretty safe bet that you can log onto Facebook with it. Best of all, it's free to use. If you don't have the app yet, you can get it here:

What all can I do on Facebook?

Messenger

Facebook Messenger is Facebook's chat client. Within Messenger, you can organize group chats with your friends, make phone calls, and even play games. To learn more about this feature, check out our separate Facebook Messenger article here.

Events

Planning a party and want to send out invites and get RSVPs back ASAP? Going to a concert and want to find out if any of your friends are going? Events is the section of Facebook that lets you do all of that. You can find out about upcoming events near you, as well as events your friends have created or are attending. Anyone can create an event, and the creator can choose who can see it, who's invited, and whether to make it public or private. Once individuals see an invite to an event, they can choose to say they're attending, they may attend, or they're not attending. That information is then added to the event's page, so the host can plan accordingly and the guests can see who else will be there.

Groups

Think of a group as being like a discussion forum where a collection of people can get together to chat and post about a specific topic or shared interest. There are groups for talking about things like sports teams, organic gardening, horror movies, yoga, RV camping, cartoons, and pretty much anything else you could possibly fathom. Like Events, anyone can create a group and choose whether it's public (anyone can join), closed (you have to ask to join), or secret (anyone can join but they have to be invited by a member). Many people also create groups for their workplace, club or school. If you come across a public group you'd like to join, all you have to do is click the "Join" button next to the group's name.

Pages

Pages are essentially profiles for celebrities and public figures, organizations, and companies. Just like you can on your own Facebook profile, individuals or organizations with pages can share updates, photos, videos and links on their page. However, instead of those things being shared with a list of friends, they're shared with everyone who has "liked" the page (similar to following someone on Twitter). So for instance, if you "like" the LAIKA Studios page, you'll see all of their behind-the-scenes updates in your newsfeed.

Anyone can create a page for themselves or to promote their business, art, or a brand they've created. However, not anyone can make a page willy-nilly for their favorite celeb — only official representatives for a company or public figure can create a page for them. Pages are great for building a following or fanbase for a project, so if you're in a band or the founder of a startup, creating a page is something you should consider.

Marketplace

Marketplace is Facebook's version of Craigslist or eBay. It's where users who are 18 years of age or older can buy and sell items to other users in a kind of virtual garage sale format. In Marketplace, you can view goods by searching specifically for what you want or by just browsing items for sale near you. The seller sets the price of the item, but you can choose to make an offer on it that differs from the seller's price and attempt to haggle a bit. Marketplace has everything from second-hand clothes to antiques to vehicles, and allows you to buy them securely via electronic payment without ever needing to leave Facebook.

Live Audio

If you've ever secretly wished that you were the smooth-talking host of your own late-night radio show, you'll probably enjoy Facebook's live audio feature. This essentially allows anyone to broadcast live radio-like audio shows through their Facebook pages to all of their friends. Listeners who tune in via their news feed will be able to leave comments, reactions and feedback in real time as well as share it with their friends.

To use live audio, you'll need to go to your Facebook homepage if you aren't already there. On top of the box you use to create posts, there should be text that says "Live Video." Click it, and then tap the small microphone icon at the bottom of the preview screen. After that, tap "Go Live." Voilà!

To read more about live audio, check out our article on it here.

Live Video

Similar to live audio, Facebook's live video feature lets you stream a live video broadcast from your Facebook page. People can comment on, react to, and share your video while it's going on, so it's good for things like Q&As where you need to directly interact with your viewers. If you want to punch up your livestream a bit, you can also doodle on your video, add stickers, or select one of Facebook's live video filters.

Local and Town Hall

This is where Facebook attempts to keep you connected to the outer world as much as the inner, more … er … internet-based world.

The Local tab lets you know what's going on around you based on your location, and suggest events for you to attend and places for you to go if you're looking for something to do. Each place has a rating, and if it has a Facebook page you can visit that and check out reviews. It also gives you the option to view the places you and your friends have previously visited.

Town Hall gets you in touch with your local government officials. You can contact them and follow their pages as well as view voting reminders for elections in your area. You can also add a constituent badge so you can identify yourself as living in a certain elected official's district.

Questions?

Still have some Facebook questions you desperately need answered? Let us know what you need in the comments below and we'll do our best to help you out!