Netflix CFO David Wells to step down

Netflix announced this morning its Chief Financial Officer David Wells would be stepping down from his role after helping the streaming service choose his successor. The company says it will be considering both internal and external candidates to fill the position. Wells has been with Netflix for fourteen years, and has served as CFO since […]

Netflix announced this morning its Chief Financial Officer David Wells would be stepping down from his role after helping the streaming service choose his successor. The company says it will be considering both internal and external candidates to fill the position. Wells has been with Netflix for fourteen years, and has served as CFO since 2010.

“It’s been 14 wonderful years at Netflix, and I’m very proud of everything we’ve accomplished,” Wells said, in a statement about his plans. “After discussing my desire to make a change with Reed, we agreed that with Netflix’s strong financial position and exciting growth plans, this is the right time for us to help identify the next financial leader for the company. Personally, I intend my next chapter to focus more on philanthropy and I like big challenges but I’m not sure yet what that looks like.”

Wells has seen Netflix grow from a U.S.-only streaming service to an international streaming giant, capitalizing on consumers’ desire for on-demand, subscription programming delivered over the internet. Today the service has over 130 million members across over 190 countries, but it’s more recently been challenged by a host of competitors not only in on-demand – like Amazon Prime Video, Hulu and HBO – but also from streaming TV services that are attracting subscribers who want access to cable TV-like programming and sports.

During its last earnings, Netflix fell short of subscriber forecasts, which panicked Wall Street sending the stock crashing. It could be that the years of rapid growth are now behind it, and the company needs to focus on what gives its service long-term staying power: its original content. Netflix may spend up to $8 billion this year on 700 original series, in fact.

“David has been a valuable partner to Netflix and to me. He skillfully managed our finances during a phase of dramatic growth that has allowed us to create and bring amazing entertainment to our members all over the world while also delivering outstanding returns to our investors,” said Reed Hastings, Netflix CEO in a statement about Wells’ departure. “I look forward to working with him during the transition as we identify a new CFO who will help us continue to pursue our ambitious goals.”

Original Content podcast: Netflix’s ‘Disenchantment’ offers tongue-in-cheek fantasy adventures

Disenchantment is the latest animated series from Matt Groening, creator of The Simpsons and Futurama. The show premieres on Netflix on August 17, and we talk about our initial impressions on the latest episode of the Original Content podcast. Our guest host Brian Heater is a big fan of Groening’s previous creations, and he also […]

Disenchantment is the latest animated series from Matt Groening, creator of The Simpsons and Futurama.

The show premieres on Netflix on August 17, and we talk about our initial impressions on the latest episode of the Original Content podcast. Our guest host Brian Heater is a big fan of Groening’s previous creations, and he also interviewed Groening for TechCrunch.

While Disenchantment brings Groening’s funny, skewed approach to a medieval fantasy setting, it isn’t a parody, exactly. It’s packed with jokes, but they rely more on the characters and on general zaniness, rather than references to (say) The Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones.

Some of us weren’t completely won over the first couple episodes. The most promising aspect of the show is its central trio of characters, including the rebellious princess Bean (voiced by Broad City‘s Abbi Jacobson), her personal demon Luci (Eric Andre) and the runaway elf Elfo (Nat Faxon).

We also discuss recent streaming headlines, including a new show for Apple from the team behind It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia and new details emerging about Disney’s plans for its yet-to-be-named streaming service.

You can listen in the player below, subscribe using Apple Podcasts or find us in your podcast player of choice. If you like the show, please let us know by leaving a review on Apple. You also can send us feedback directly. (Or suggest shows and movies for us to review!)

Thanks to Anchor for letting us record in their Manhattan podcasting studio before it officially opens.

Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder Location

Netflix does allow you to download movies and shows offline with the Windows 10 Netflix app. That’s why the location of the Netflix download folder becomes important. Netflix as yet does not give you an option to change the download location. Also, it does not allow you to browse to the place where your downloads are saved. If your drive is filling up fast, you can manually move the downloads to another location. When you want to watch them again, copy them back to the original location. Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder Open File Explorer from the Task Bar. The…

Read the full article: Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder Location

Netflix does allow you to download movies and shows offline with the Windows 10 Netflix app. That’s why the location of the Netflix download folder becomes important. Netflix as yet does not give you an option to change the download location. Also, it does not allow you to browse to the place where your downloads are saved.

If your drive is filling up fast, you can manually move the downloads to another location. When you want to watch them again, copy them back to the original location.

Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder

  1. Open File Explorer from the Task Bar.
  2. The Netflix folder is a hidden folder. To display it, go to the View tab and then click on the Option menu button on the right.
  3. In Folder Options, select the View tab and scroll to the Files and Folders settings. If it’s not checked, then select the Show Hidden files, folders, and drives setting to enable it.
  4. Folder Options in Windows 10
  5. Click OK.
  6. From the File Explorer, you can navigate to the Netflix download folder. The full path is:
    C:Users[USERNAME]AppDataLocalPackages4DF9E0F8.Netflix_mcm4njqhnhss8LocalStateofflineInfodownloads

    Here [USERNAME] is the Windows folder with your current username.

It’s obvious but you can also copy-paste C:Users and then select the folder with your username. Just append the file path after that to get to the folder without drilling down the hierarchy.

The Netflix download folder will be empty if you have never downloaded any movies or shows with the Windows 10 Netflix app. But, carry out your first download and you will see a bunch of files here. The largest will belong to the actual media file.

Netflix Download Folder

Notice that there are no file names which help you identify the movie or show. Rename the largest file and Netflix won’t recognize them. Also, you cannot play them with any media player except the Netflix app.

Till Netflix adds a few more file management features, at least the location can help you manage your drive space when it starts to run out. If you haven’t tried Netflix and its offline viewing feature, try it once.

Read the full article: Where to Find the Netflix Download Folder Location

How to Make Your Own Private Netflix Using Dropbox, Google Drive, or OneDrive

make-your-netflix

Given the amount of content on offer, Netflix offers phenomenal value for money. However, if you’ve already got an extensive library of locally saved TV shows and movies (perhaps because you spent time ripping your old DVDs to digitize your collection), you might not want to pay for Netflix. So, why not use Google Drive, OneDrive, or Dropbox in conjunction with Kodi to make your own private Netflix? Warning: Don’t download TV shows and movies illegally. This process should only use content that you legally own. Watching pirated material could land you in trouble with the law. What You’ll Need…

Read the full article: How to Make Your Own Private Netflix Using Dropbox, Google Drive, or OneDrive

make-your-netflix

Given the amount of content on offer, Netflix offers phenomenal value for money.

However, if you’ve already got an extensive library of locally saved TV shows and movies (perhaps because you spent time ripping your old DVDs to digitize your collection), you might not want to pay for Netflix.

So, why not use Google Drive, OneDrive, or Dropbox in conjunction with Kodi to make your own private Netflix?

Warning: Don’t download TV shows and movies illegally. This process should only use content that you legally own. Watching pirated material could land you in trouble with the law.

What You’ll Need to Get Started

There are two ways to make your own private Netflix. You can either use the cloud storage providers’ desktop apps and point your Kodi library at the synced folder, or you can use the companies’ official Kodi plugins.

We’ll explain both methods. But first, there are some steps you need to take regardless of which process you decide to use.

Firstly, download and install Kodi. It’s available for all the major operating systems (yes, you can even install Kodi on iOS). The app is also available on most streaming boxes. You might even decide to buy a dedicated Kodi box.

Secondly, you’ll need to upload all your TV shows and movies to your preferred cloud storage provider. Put your TV shows and movies into separate folders within the cloud. Depending on the size of your videos and the speed of your internet connection, this process could take a considerable amount of time.

onedrive uploads

If you’re not sure which cloud provider to use, you should consider each service’s storage limits. From the standpoint of making your own private Netflix, it’s the most important feature.

Google Drive gives you 15GB for free, OneDrive provides 5GB, and Dropbox offers 2GB. However, all three have ways to increase their storage without spending a dime. Google sometimes offers free storage for undertaking a privacy health check, while OneDrive and Dropbox both provide more space when you refer friends to the services.

Of course, you can also pay for more space. For example, if you subscribe to Office 365, Microsoft will boost your OneDrive space to 1TB.

When all your content has successfully uploaded, you’re ready to move on to the next step.

Method 1: Use Desktop Apps

All three cloud services offer official desktop apps. The apps will create a directory on your machine which allows you to access your content through your computer’s file system. You can then point Kodi at the apps’ folders and pull the videos into your library.

You should use this method if there’s a chance you might watch your TV shows and movies through other apps on your computer in addition to Kodi; the videos will always be available on your machine.

It’s also a great way to keep your content up-to-date on multiple instances of Kodi without needing to add new videos to each one of your Kodi apps on a case-by-case basis.

If you plan to use Kodi on a streaming box (such as the Amazon Fire TV), you will need to learn how to set up Kodi as a server to make this process work. It might be better to use the second method which we will explain shortly.

To get started with this method, you need to download and install the app for the provider you have chosen:

During the initial setup phase, all three apps will prompt you to choose which cloud folders you want to be available on your computer.

Make sure you select the folder where you uploaded your videos. Furthermore, ensure you choose the setting which keeps a copy of the videos on your hard drive. The next steps will not work if you merely enable a link to the cloud version of the file.

onedrive choose files

Create a Library

Now we need to turn our attention to Kodi. You need to create a new library and point it at the synchronized folder on your hard drive.

It’s a straightforward process, just follow the instructions below:

  1. Open Kodi.
  2. In the menu on the left-hand side of the screen, select either Movies or TV shows.
  3. Click on Add videos.
  4. The Add video source window will open. Click on Browse and choose the synced folder on your hard drive. Its location will vary depending on which cloud service you use.
  5. Choose a name for your new library.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Tell Kodi what type of media is in the library and select your metadata agents.
  8. Click OK.

onedrive add library

Your media will appear in your Kodi library (though it might take some time for all the associated metadata to download). You can now browse your media like a regular local Kodi library.

Method 2: Use Official Kodi Add-Ons

There is an add-on in the official Kodi repo for each of Google Drive, OneDrive, and Dropbox. You can use them to display videos from your cloud storage drives directly in the Kodi app.

You should use this method if you want to make your own private Netflix on Kodi on a Fire TV device, Android TV device, or another set-top streaming box.

To begin, you need to install the add-ons from the repo:

  1. Open Kodi.
  2. In the left-hand panel, select Add-ons.
  3. At the top of the page, click on Install from repository.
  4. Choose Kodi Add-on Repository.
  5. Select Picture Add-ons.
  6. Click on your preferred cloud storage provider. The Dropbox add-on is called Dbmc.
  7. Select Install.

onedrive kodi addon

Note: For more information about working with add-ons, check out our beginner’s guide to Kodi.

To run the add-on, return to the Kodi homescreen and click Add-ons in the left-hand panel. You will see your new add-on in the main panel.

onedrive kodi signin

Click on the app’s thumbnail and enter your credentials when prompted. You can add as many accounts as you want, meaning each member of your household can make their own private Netflix.

Add the Source

When you’ve completed the login process, you will be able to use your cloud storage as a source when you create a new library.

The source address varies depending on which add-on you’re using:

  • Google Drive: http://localhost:8587/source/
  • OneDrive: http://localhost:8586/source/

Unfortunately, you cannot use Dropbox as a source. You can only browse the TV shows and movies within your Dropbox account through Kodi’s Videos menu. Therefore, if you have a choice, it’s preferable to use the desktop version of Dropbox as described in “Method 1”.

The other downside to this method is the potential security implications. Third-party developers make all the add-ons; some people might not feel comfortable granting the add-ons access to their accounts.

Other Ways to Watch Content on Kodi

Using cloud storage providers to make your own private Netflix is just one of the many ways you can watch content on Kodi.

Some of the best Kodi add-ons let you watch live TV and on-demand content for free, and there are also plenty of Kodi add-ons that let you watch live news.

Read the full article: How to Make Your Own Private Netflix Using Dropbox, Google Drive, or OneDrive

July sets a record for number of $100M+ venture capital rounds

In July 2018, the tech sector’s leisure class — venture capitalists — kicked investments into overdrive, at least when it comes to financing supergiant venture rounds of $100 million or more. With 55 deals accounting for just over $15 billion, July likely set an all-time record for the number of huge venture deals struck in a single month.

In July 2018, the tech sector’s leisure class — venture capitalists — kicked investments into overdrive, at least when it comes to financing supergiant venture rounds of $100 million or more (in native or as-converted USD values).

With 55 deals accounting for just over $15 billion at time of writing, July likely set an all-time record for the number of huge venture deals struck in a single month.

The table below has just the top 10 largest rounds from the month. (A full list of all the supergiant venture rounds can be found here.)

It’s certainly a record high for the past decade. Earlier this month, we set out to find when the current mega-round trend began. We found that, prior to the tail end of 2013, supergiant VC rounds were relatively rare. In a given month between 2007 and the start of the supergiant round era, a $100 million round would be announced every few weeks, on average. And many months had no such deals come across the wires.

Of course, that hasn’t been the case recently.

Why is this happening? As with most things in entrepreneurial finance, context matters.

There are some obvious factors to consider. At the later-stage end of the spectrum, the market is currently awash in money. Billions of dollars in dry powder is in the offing as venture investors continue to raise new and ever-larger venture funds. All that capital has to be put to work somewhere.

But there’s another, and perhaps less obvious, cog in the machine: the changing part VCs play in a company’s life cycle. The current climate presents a stark contrast to the last time the market was this active (in the late 1990s). Back then, companies looking to raise nine and 10-figure sums would typically have to turn to private equity firms or boutique late-stage tech investors, or raise from the public market via an IPO.

Now some venture capital firms are able to provide financial and strategic support from the first investment check a private company cashes to when it goes public or gets acquired. On the one hand, this prolongs the time it takes for companies to exit. But on the other, some venture firms get to double, triple and quadruple down on their best bets.

But as in Newtonian physics, a market that goes up will also come down. The pace of supergiant funding announcements will have to slow at some point. What are some of the potential catalysts for such a slowdown? Keep an eye out for one or more of the following:

  • U.S. monetary policy could change. As stultifyingly boring as Federal Reserve interest rate policy is, very low interest rates are a major contributor to the state of the market today. With money so cheap, other interest rate-pegged investment vehicles like bonds perform relatively poorly, which drives institutional limited partners to seek high returns in greener pastures. Venture capital presents that greenfield opportunity today, but that can change if interest rates rise again.
  • A sustained public market downtrend for tech companies. While everything was coming up Milhouse in the private market, a few publicly traded tech giants got cut down to size. Facebook, Twitter and Netflix all reported slower than expected growth, leading to a downward repricing of their shares. So far, most of the steepest declines are isolated to consumer-facing companies. But if we start to see disappointing earnings from more enterprise-focused companies, or if asset prices remain depressed for more than just a couple of months, this could slow the pace of large rounds and lower valuations.
  • Narrowing or vanishing paths to liquidity. For the past several quarters, the count of venture-backed companies that get acquired has slowly but consistently declined, a trend Crunchbase News has documented in its quarterly reporting. At the same time, though, the IPO market has mostly thawed for venture-backed tech companies. Even companies with ugly financials can make a public market debut these days. But if IPO pipeline flow slows, or if otherwise healthy companies fail to thrive when they do go public, that could spell bad news for investors in need of liquidity.

All this being said, there’s little sign that the market is slowing down. Crunchbase has already recorded four rounds north of $100 million in the first two days of August. Most notably, ride-hailing company Grab snagged another $1 billion in funding (after gulping down $1 billion last month) at a post-money valuation of $11 billion.

If you believe the stereotypes, venture investors are either already on vacation or packing their bags for late summer jaunts to exotic locales at this time of year. But, as it turns out, raising money is always in season. So even though the dog days of summer are upon us, August could end up being just as wild as July.

Original Content podcast: The end is in sight on ‘Orange is the New Black’

Orange is the New Black is back for a sixth season, dealing with the fallout from season five and shifting the location to the maximum security wing of Litchfield Prison. On the latest episode of the Original Content podcast, we’re joined by Megan Rose Dickey to discuss the latest developments on one of Netflix’s longest-running […]

Orange is the New Black is back for a sixth season, dealing with the fallout from season five and shifting the location to the maximum security wing of Litchfield Prison.

On the latest episode of the Original Content podcast, we’re joined by Megan Rose Dickey to discuss the latest developments on one of Netflix’s longest-running shows. Some of us are more on-board with the show than others, but we’re all impressed by the show’s balance between drama and comedy.

We also speculate about whether the story may be winding down, and whether OITNB‘s seventh season might be its last.

Before our review, we recap the week’s streaming and entertainment news, including Netflix’s acquisition of an Andy Serkis-directed version of Animal Farm, its plans for a show about African-American pioneer Madam C.J, Walker starring Octavia Spencer and MoviePass’ ongoing difficulties.

You can listen in the player below, subscribe using Apple Podcasts or find us in your podcast player of choice. If you like the show, please let us know by leaving a review on Apple. You also can send us feedback directly. (Or suggest shows and movies for us to review!)

Matt Groening goes back to the drawing board for ‘Disenchantment’

“I tried walking around in a Homer mask, but the latex is hard to breathe in. My head gets so sweaty and my glasses fog up. It’s not worth it for me,” Matt Groening laughs. “But what a way to go, suffocating on a Homer Simpson mask.” The cartoonist bemoans his inability to go incognito […]

“I tried walking around in a Homer mask, but the latex is hard to breathe in. My head gets so sweaty and my glasses fog up. It’s not worth it for me,” Matt Groening laughs. “But what a way to go, suffocating on a Homer Simpson mask.”

The cartoonist bemoans his inability to go incognito on a recent trip to San Diego Comic-Con. It would be a poetic death, perhaps, asphyxiating beneath the likeness of his most iconic creation. But he doesn’t want to make the headline writers’ jobs too easy when he finally casts off this mortal coil.

“Years ago, there was an airline that did a promotion, where they painted The Simpsons on the side,” Groening adds. “We all drove out to give it a send off, and the entire crew got on the plane in Burbank and road it around in a circle and it came down. One other writer and I refused to get on the plane, because we didn’t want the jokes that would invariably come if the plane were to crash. That’s not how we wanted to be remembered.”

Groening in 2000. (Photo by Colin Davey/Getty Images)

The Simpsons will forever loom large over Groening’s existence. Spawning 30 seasons of a nearly universally beloved television program will do that to a legacy. And most recently, the show and its creator have been grappling with the topic of embattled character Apu — which he’s addressed with mixed results and was intent on not discussing on our call.

In recent weeks, the artist has been single-mindedly focused on Disenchantment, with one final promotional push before the series makes its mid-August Netflix debut.

The show has some seemingly impossible expectations to live up to as Groening’s third animated series. Its predecessor, Futurama, while failing the nearly impossible task of maintaining the ubiquity and longevity of The Simpsons, has become a beloved franchise in its own right, living on beyond its two-network running through constant syndication and an endless stream of memes.

In many ways, the series is Groening’s most ambitious to date, trading in the streets of Springfield and pneumatic tubes of New York for a fantasy world somewhere between Westeros and Middle Earth. It’s a genre he says he’s been looking to tackle for decades, but had never found the right outlet. And while the new series exists in a world familiar to fantasy fans, it rarely butts up against direct parody of beloved properties.  

“I’ve been thinking about fantasy for a long time,” Groening says. “Some of my favorite forms of entertainment are fantasy, starting with Fractured Fairy Tales on the old Rocky and Bullwinkle show, to Monty Python and the Holy Grail to the original Wizard of Oz film and novels by Terry Pratchett and Gene Wolfe.”

Disenchantment is a tricky cocktail to get just right — a fairly tale adventure mixture, spiked with solid punch lines. “I try to incorporate all of that as inspiration and then try not to do straight parody,” says Groening. “The problem with comedy is that just getting the genre is very easy and only goes a little ways. So, what we do is try to get people on board with the fantasy characters and make them as emotional real as possible.”

An embarrassment of talent should help. The series is helmed by Groening and former Simpsons show runner, Josh Weinstein. Broad City star Abbi Jackson takes the lead as Bean, a drinking/gambling/cursing princess with a fittingly rebellious streak. Comedians Eric Andre and Nat Faxon fill out the primary leads as a “personal demon” named Luci and elf with the decided uninspired name, Elfo, respectively.

The rest of the cast is rounded out by a stack of British comedians from series like The Mighty Boosh and The Toast of London, along with mainstay voice actors from his previous series. Groening and Weinstein also poached liberally from the shows to stock the writers’ room.

“We have a writing staff that’s a combination of old guys from Futurama and The Simpsons and some younger writers who definitely have a different point of view,” says Groening. “They just don’t understand the appeal of old character actors from the 1930s and ’40s.”

All of that is rounded out by music from Devo mastermind Mark Mothersbaugh, whom Groening refers to fondly as “a Balkan-ska-klezmer combination that you’ve never heard before in a fantasy show.”

The real secret sauce, however, may be Netflix itself. Along with Amazon and Hulu, the platform has transformed the way television content is consumed, freeing Groening and the rest of the crew from television sitcom constrains that shaped his two previous series.

As Springfield Confidential, the new book from longtime Simpsons show runner Mike Reiss reveals, Groening has been interested in long-term character pay-off for some time. It was Groening who pushed for a series ending in which Marge is revealed to be a rabbit — an homage to Groening’s longtime weekly strip, Life in Hell.

Oh, and then there’s his big plans to reveal that Krusty the Clown was actually Homer disguised as a way to connect to his son. That was ultimately a too-complicated subplot for the writers to tackle during the show’s early seasons.

“You take advantage of whatever the boundaries are and try to push them,” says Groening. “It’s one thing when it’s a 22-minute network sitcom that has commercial breaks every seven minutes. That makes you write in a certain way. If you’re on Netflix and have 10 episodes to tell your story, it changes everything. You can tell longer, bigger arcs, you don’t have to reset at the end of every episode. There’s a literal cliffhanger at the end of episode one.”

Disenchantment may never hit the full epic fantasy sweeps of Lord of the Rings or Game of Thrones, but it’s clear from the outset that the story has broader ambitions than most can achieve in a traditional half-hour comedy format. Without showing his hand, Groening lets on that “the very first thing you see is a giant clue that’s staring you in the face that reveals something about what you’re watching.”

It’s not a particularly useful hint, so far as those things go, but the artist is clearly happy to prime the pump for enthusiastic fans to comb over the content of the first 10 episodes through repeat binges. If its predecessors are any indication, that sort of rapid fandom ought not be too difficult to stoke.

“We threw in a lot of secrets and clues and puzzles for the kind of obsessive fan I’ve come to know, specifically from Futurama and, of course, The Simpsons,” says Groening. “You try to reward those people for paying attention. That’s where the original idea for the freeze-frame jokes from The Simpsons came from. If you didn’t see it, it doesn’t matter, but if you’re the kind of person who would freeze the frame and actually read the joke, you’ll get something out of it. We’ve done that with Disenchantment. We think it works as a sleepy time, fun, epic fantasy you can watch as you drift off at night. Or, if you’re the kind of person who obsesses, there’s something for you there, too.”

More immediate gratification for Simpsons and Futurama fans can be found in Groening’s unmistakable character design. It’s a bit jarring at first, seeing those icons filtered through a medieval fantasy landscape, but ultimately the aesthetic provides a grounding for first-time viewers. It’s warm and comfortable, like an old coat, and likely to help fans stay invested as the story unfolds gradually over the course of these first 10 episodes.

The style has been Groening’s calling card since well before The Simpsons — prior even to Life in Hell, which finally drew to a close in 2012 after a 32-year run. 

“What always amazed me is that this very simple style could be very expressive,” Groening explains. “With just a few curving lines and changing them slightly, you could come up with every expression that you wanted. I can’t do it, but I work with animators and designers who can take that style and make them attractive.”

That Elfo looks like a green Bart Simpson in a Smurf hat is the result of something more primordial in the cartoonist’s line work.

“I developed that style of the large bulgy eyes and ridiculous over-bite when I was 12 years old,” explains Groening. “Actually, Elfo is based on the very first character in that style that I drew. He was named Melvin. I used to draw a lot of comics with that guy, and basically gave him an elf hat and pointy ears.”

“Bart and Elfo came from Melvin — Elfo didn’t come from Bart,” Groening adds with a laugh. “That’s a very important clarification.”

Disenchantment premieres August 16 on Netflix

Walmart reportedly recruits ex-Epix CEO in bid to build video service

According to new reports, Walmart has enlisted the services of Mark Greenberg to help build a subscription video streaming service. Rumors have been floating around for some time now, that the retailer is looking to go head to head with the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime video, and Greenberg — who left the role […]

According to new reports, Walmart has enlisted the services of Mark Greenberg to help build a subscription video streaming service. Rumors have been floating around for some time now, that the retailer is looking to go head to head with the likes of Netflix and Amazon Prime video, and Greenberg — who left the role of CEO at Epix in September — is well-positioned to help.

The service would reportedly function apart from Vudu, the a la carte video service Walmart purchased in 2010, as a bid to bolster its smart TV offerings. According to Variety, the streaming service would be firmly targeted at what the retail giant views as its core demographic, with a low subscription price and content targeted directly at “Middle America.”

The company is said to be eying an $8 a month price point, which would put it $2 below Netflix’s standard subscription fee. Amazon Video is probably a more comparable competitor, given the size and breadth of both companies, but at the moment, Walmart doesn’t have an offering that fits the same scope as Amazon Prime.

Vudu, on the other hand, features around 150,000 films to purchase or rent, but currently commands only around 13-percent of videos streamed from U.S. TVs. Netflix and Amazon, meanwhile, are responsible 73 and 28 percent, respectively, by Comscore’s count.

This is all in the very early stages, according to reports. As such, neither Walmart nor Greenberg are disclosing anything.

Netflix plans to turn Phil Knight’s ‘Shoe Dog’ into a movie

Netflix has optioned Shoe Dog, the bestselling memoir by Nike co-founder and former CEO Phil Knight. While the streaming service has had its most high-profile success with original shows like Orange is the New Black and Stranger Things, it sounds like it’s planning to turn Shoe Dog into a film. Knight and Frank Marshall will produce, while […]

Netflix has optioned Shoe Dog, the bestselling memoir by Nike co-founder and former CEO Phil Knight.

While the streaming service has had its most high-profile success with original shows like Orange is the New Black and Stranger Things, it sounds like it’s planning to turn Shoe Dog into a film. Knight and Frank Marshall will produce, while Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (the true-life-focused writing team behind Ed Wood, Man on the Moon and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story) pen the screenplay.

Netflix’s announcement says Marshall and Knight first met on the set of Back to the Future, where Marshall was one of the executive producers.

“Ever since our collaboration on BTTF and being a runner myself, I’ve always been fascinated by Phil’s story and how the company came to be,” Marshall said in a statement. “It’s an amazing tale about what the path to success really looks like, with its mistakes, struggles, sacrifice and even luck. It’s about how a company can grow with the right people, dedication, a belief in the power of sport and a shared mission to build a brand that would change everything.”

This isn’t the first time Netflix has tried to tell business stories drawn from the real world. It adapted Sophia Amoruso’s Girlboss into a series last year, then canceled the show after one season.

Shoe Dog was published in 2016. Bill Gates wrote that in contrast to most books about entrepreneurship, Knight’s memoir is “a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like.” It remains on the New York Times besteller list more than two years later.

It’s also worth noting that Knight also has a connection to the film world through his ownership of the Laika, the stop motion animation studio behind Coraline and Kubo and the Two Strings — the latter film was directed by Laika CEO (and Knight’s son) Travis Knight.

Netflix plans to turn Phil Knight’s ‘Shoe Dog’ into a movie

Netflix has optioned Shoe Dog, the bestselling memoir by Nike co-founder and former CEO Phil Knight. While the streaming service has had its most high-profile success with original shows like Orange is the New Black and Stranger Things, it sounds like it’s planning to turn Shoe Dog into a film. Knight and Frank Marshall will produce, while […]

Netflix has optioned Shoe Dog, the bestselling memoir by Nike co-founder and former CEO Phil Knight.

While the streaming service has had its most high-profile success with original shows like Orange is the New Black and Stranger Things, it sounds like it’s planning to turn Shoe Dog into a film. Knight and Frank Marshall will produce, while Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski (the true-life-focused writing team behind Ed Wood, Man on the Moon and The People v. O.J. Simpson: American Crime Story) pen the screenplay.

Netflix’s announcement says Marshall and Knight first met on the set of Back to the Future, where Marshall was one of the executive producers.

“Ever since our collaboration on BTTF and being a runner myself, I’ve always been fascinated by Phil’s story and how the company came to be,” Marshall said in a statement. “It’s an amazing tale about what the path to success really looks like, with its mistakes, struggles, sacrifice and even luck. It’s about how a company can grow with the right people, dedication, a belief in the power of sport and a shared mission to build a brand that would change everything.”

This isn’t the first time Netflix has tried to tell business stories drawn from the real world. It adapted Sophia Amoruso’s Girlboss into a series last year, then canceled the show after one season.

Shoe Dog was published in 2016. Bill Gates wrote that in contrast to most books about entrepreneurship, Knight’s memoir is “a refreshingly honest reminder of what the path to business success really looks like.” It remains on the New York Times besteller list more than two years later.

It’s also worth noting that Knight also has a connection to the film world through his ownership of the Laika, the stop motion animation studio behind Coraline and Kubo and the Two Strings — the latter film was directed by Laika CEO (and Knight’s son) Travis Knight.