Mozilla’s Firefox Monitor will now alert you when one of your accounts was hacked

Earlier this year, Mozilla announced Firefox Monitor, a service that tells you if your online accounts were hacked in a recent data breach. All you have to give it is your email address and it’ll use the Have I Been Pwned database to show you if you need to worry and what data was compromised. Today, […]

Earlier this year, Mozilla announced Firefox Monitor, a service that tells you if your online accounts were hacked in a recent data breach. All you have to give it is your email address and it’ll use the Have I Been Pwned database to show you if you need to worry and what data was compromised. Today, Mozilla is taking this a step further by also letting you sign up for alerts for when your accounts appear in any (known) breaches in the future.

When it first launched, Mozilla considered Firefox Monitor an experimental service. Now, it’s being launched as an official service.

If none of your accounts have been hacked yet, consider yourself lucky. That still makes you the perfect user for Firefox Monitor’s new alerting feature, though, because chances are your email address will show up in a future breach sooner or later. Indeed, when Mozilla first asked people about which features they most wanted from a service like this, notifications about future breaches were very high on most people’s list.

Mozilla notes that Firefox Monitor is just one of a number of new data and privacy features the organization has on its roadmap for the next few months. It’s clear that Mozilla is positioning itself as a neutral force and overall, that seems to be going quite well, especially given that Google’s Chrome browser is facing a bit of a backlash these days as users are increasingly concerned about their privacy and the vast trove of data Google collects.

Idaho inmates hacked prison-issued tablets for $225,000 in credits

Inmates in Idaho successfully hacked the software of the prison-issued tablets to issue themselves nearly a quarter of a million dollars in credits on the devices that are often one of their only connections to the outside world. The tablets, made by prominent prison vendor JPay, give inmates the ability to use email, listen to […]

Inmates in Idaho successfully hacked the software of the prison-issued tablets to issue themselves nearly a quarter of a million dollars in credits on the devices that are often one of their only connections to the outside world. The tablets, made by prominent prison vendor JPay, give inmates the ability to use email, listen to music and transfer money, among other basic computing functions but charge fees for some services.

The Associated Press reports that Idaho prison officials discovered 364 inmates leveraging a software vulnerability to increase their JPay account balances. In Idaho, the devices are the result of a partnership between JPay and CenturyLink. The latter company confirmed the software vulnerability but declined to offer further details beyond stating that it had since been resolved.

Of the 364 inmates exploiting JPay, 50 inmates were able to issue themselves credits for more than $1,000. One inmate was able to use the software flaw to self-issue a credit of almost $10,000. The company has recovered about a quarter of the total of around $225,000 so far and has suspended some functions for inmates until they reimburse the stolen credits.

“This conduct was intentional, not accidental. It required a knowledge of the JPay system and multiple actions by every inmate who exploited the system’s vulnerability to improperly credit their account,” Idaho Department of Correction spokesperson Jeff Ray said in a statement on the JPay incident.

The individuals exploiting the JPay system are incarcerated at a handful of Idaho prisons, including Idaho State Correctional Institution, Idaho State Correctional Center, South Idaho Correctional Institution, Idaho Correctional Institution-Orofino and a private Correctional Alternative Placement Plan building.

On its website, JPay describes itself as a “highly trusted name in corrections because we offer a fast and secure method of sending money,” which seems up for debate given the recent turn of events. The company has a presence in prisons across 35 states.