How to Create Free Ringtones Directly on Your iPhone

Custom ringtones are a great way to personalize your phone. iPhone owners can buy new ringtones from iTunes, but that’s a lot of money to spend on something so simple. There’s a better way: Did you know you can also make ringtones right on your iPhone? You can record any sound or create your own musical masterpiece, and turn it into a ringtone all using the phone in your pocket. It’s easy to take any non-protected music track you have on your device and make a ringtone from it. What You’ll Need You don’t need to download an expensive third-party…

Read the full article: How to Create Free Ringtones Directly on Your iPhone

Custom ringtones are a great way to personalize your phone. iPhone owners can buy new ringtones from iTunes, but that’s a lot of money to spend on something so simple.

There’s a better way: Did you know you can also make ringtones right on your iPhone? You can record any sound or create your own musical masterpiece, and turn it into a ringtone all using the phone in your pocket. It’s easy to take any non-protected music track you have on your device and make a ringtone from it.

What You’ll Need

You don’t need to download an expensive third-party music app to make ringtones on your iPhone. You can use Apple’s own GarageBand, available free from the App Store. It works on any iPhone or iPad running iOS 11 or later. To check which version of iOS you have on your device, go to the Settings app, tap General, and choose Software Update.

It’s simple to store your created GarageBand track in iCloud. Then you’re able to open it on any other iPhone, iPad, or even the Mac version of GarageBand.

GarageBand is a powerful multitrack music sequencer that you can use to create professional-sounding songs. With this tutorial, though, you’re going to take an existing music track and turn it into a ringtone. It all happens right on your iPhone—no computer needed. Let’s get started.

Download: GarageBand for iOS | Mac (Free)

Step 1: Create a GarageBand Project

Tap the GarageBand icon on your phone to open it. If you’ve used the app before, you’ll see a list of projects you’ve already made. Your ringtone must be in its own project, so to make a new one, tap the Plus button in the top-right corner, then select the Tracks tab.

Now you can swipe sideways to choose between any of the built-in instruments, the sound library (which includes prerecorded sounds and loops), and the Audio Recorder. To import an existing song into your new project, choose Audio Recorder by tapping on it.

GarageBand App Instrument Picker

The Audio Recorder screen is all set up for recording sounds, which can be a fun way to make new ringtones. But if you want to turn an existing piece of music into a ringtone, you won’t need any of those fancy controls.

Instead, tap the third icon from the left at the top of the screen (shown below with an arrow) to go to the main editing screen.

GarageBand app audio recorder screen

Step 2: Import Music

GarageBand can import any unprotected music track that’s on your iPhone. It can also do this for tracks in places your iPhone can access, like your iCloud or Dropbox account for example.

Unprotected music is music that doesn’t have DRM (Digital Rights Management) attached. Songs downloaded from iTunes are usually off-limits, though we’ve shown how you can turn your iTunes music into ringtones on your desktop. However, there are loads of other places to download music, including lots of free ones.

To import a song, click the loop icon (second from right) at the top of the main GarageBand editing screen.

GarageBand App Main Editor

Tap Files, then Browse items from the Files app to see all the music files your iPhone has stored. Below you can see a track we’ve downloaded from the Free Music Archive and saved in iCloud. Tapping on a file will copy it to your phone.

GarageBand App File List

Once your chosen file has downloaded to your iPhone, you’ll be taken back to the Files tab. Next, tap your finger on the song you want to use as the ringtone, hold it, then drag it up towards the top of the screen. The list of files will hide so that you can drop the song into the main editor, like this:

GarageBand App dragging and dropping music

You can listen to the music you imported by tapping the Play button at the top of the screen. If you just want to turn this track into a ringtone without making any changes, then you’re almost done!

Step 3: Export the Ringtone

Before you can turn the music into a ringtone, you need to go back to the list of projects. Tap the downward-facing triangle icon in the top-left, then tap My Songs. GarageBand will take you back to the project list, where your new song will show up as My Song. If you’d like to change its name, tap and hold it to bring up the contex menu, and choose Rename.

When you’re ready to turn your music track into a ringtone, you’ll need the contextual menu again. Tap and hold on your project, choose Share from the popup menu, then select Ringtone.

You can change the name of the ringtone again here if you want; otherwise just tap Export. It will take a few seconds for GarageBand to work its magic, then you’ll see a screen like this:

GarageBand App Export Complete

Now you can either tap OK to return to the project list, or Use sound as to use the ringtone right away. That will give you three options:

  • Standard Ringtone: This will set the song as your regular ringtone.
  • Standard Text Tone: Makes this song play every time you get a text message.
  • Assign to Contact: This option lets you assign the song as the ringtone for a particular contact in your address book.

GarageBand App Assign Ringtone

How to Change Ringtones on iPhone

If you don’t assign your new ringtone from within GarageBand, you can set it anytime. Head into the Settings app, choose Sounds, and then tap on Ringtone. Your custom-made ringtones will show at the top of the list, above all the standard ones that came with your phone.

If you want to use your ringtone for a particular friend or family member, you can select that person in the Contacts app, tap Edit, then choose Ringtone or Text Tone to use your new masterpiece.

Ultra-Personalized Ringtones

GarageBand is a really powerful music creation app. You’re not limited to using existing music tracks; you can compose your own using the built-in instruments. You can record sounds or music through your iPhone’s microphone too.

That’s a great way of making ultra-personalized ringtones for individual contacts. For example, you can record someone singing or saying their own name, and use it as a ringtone for that person.

The possibilities are almost endless, meaning you have an endless supply of unique and free ringtones.

Take your music creation further by reading our guide to GarageBand. And don’t forget that setting a fresh ringtone is just one of the important iPhone tweaks you should make.

Read the full article: How to Create Free Ringtones Directly on Your iPhone

8 Music Maker iPhone Apps to Create Music Anywhere

iphone-music-making-apps

It’s easier than ever to create music on your iPhone, even if you don’t have a musical background. You don’t need to know how to read music, play an instrument, or even understand musical concepts like chords and scales. There are apps for every skill level, every budget, and (virtually) every genre of music you wish to create. Try your hand at shiny pop songs, complex breakcore, or even string-heavy cinematic scores. Today we won’t focus on individual instruments, but all-in-one workstations, playthings, and musical tools to get the job done. 1. Auxy Auxy is the best music production app…

Read the full article: 8 Music Maker iPhone Apps to Create Music Anywhere

It’s easier than ever to create music on your iPhone, even if you don’t have a musical background. You don’t need to know how to read music, play an instrument, or even understand musical concepts like chords and scales.

There are apps for every skill level, every budget, and (virtually) every genre of music you wish to create. Try your hand at shiny pop songs, complex breakcore, or even string-heavy cinematic scores.

Today we won’t focus on individual instruments, but all-in-one workstations, playthings, and musical tools to get the job done.

1. Auxy

Auxy is the best music production app on the iOS platform. While many apps try to rewrite the rules when it comes to creating beats and loops, Auxy only tries to simplify the process. The result is a free app that’s approachable, while offering serious power to those who know how to use it.

Use the piano roll editor to write looping melodies and bass lines, and create intricate drum patterns using pre-set or custom drum instruments. You can then arrange your patterns in scenes to create finished productions. Share them to SoundCloud, or export as uncompressed WAVs for further tweaking in your desktop digital audio workstation (DAW).

Auxy is free to download, with $5 monthly subscription to unlock additional instruments, thousands of samples, and the ability to import your own sounds. There’s more than enough here to keep you happy for a few weeks while you figure out how to use the app before you open your wallet.

Download: Auxy (Free, subscription available)

2. GarageBand

GarageBand for iPhone

GarageBand is one of Apple’s best-known pieces of software. The Mac version has been used by artists like Rihanna, Justice, and Oasis as part of their creative process. It’s now available for free, in the palm of your hand, and makes great use of the touchscreen.

The app includes a great range of virtual instruments. You’ll find everything from drums and drum machines, to stringed instruments like violins, virtual pianos and keyboards, and even virtual amplifiers for use with real guitars. With these tools and the sequencer you can create songs that sound great in very little time.

GarageBand for iOS Sound Library

Then there’s Apple’s library of royalty-free samples, available to use however you see fit. You can fuse these with your own creations, record a rough vocal mix with your iPhone’s microphone, and create demos using just your phone. Learn how to use GarageBand with our step-by-step guide.

Download: GarageBand (Free)

3. Figure

Before I became horribly addicted to Auxy, Figure was my musical toy of choice. It’s an insanely easy to pick up musical plaything, and I’ve created hundreds of loops with it. I attribute most of Figure’s allure to its rigidly restrictive three instrument setup.

You get one drum machine, one lead synth, and one bass synth. There are a multitude of instruments for each element, which you can mix and match. Record synth parts by tapping, holding, and swiping the XY pads. Adjust the range of the scale, change the key, and fine-tune the sound till you’re happy.

You can free-hand the drums or use the built-in quantization to effortlessly build beats, then blend it all together. Figure used to cost $1, but it’s now a free app. Download it right now and have a play, or check out some of the mixes people have created with Figure.

Download: Figure (Free)

4. KORG Gadget

KORG’s lineup of iOS apps is almost as impressive as its range of hardware instruments. Gadget is a fully fledged audio workstation, featuring lead and bass synthesizers, analog and sample-based drum machines, and a sampler for recording external sound. The app was previously iPad-only, but now works flawlessly on the small iPhone screen too.

The app includes a powerful sequencer to tie all your gadgets together, with full automation and MIDI support. There’s also a built-in community, allowing you to share your creations and listen to what others have made for inspiration.

KORG Gadget is a full-featured iPhone and iPad musical workstation, and it’s not cheap. Fortunately there’s a light version to sample before you buy, though it limits you to three gadgets over three tracks. Advanced features like MIDI export, exporting to Ableton, Audiobus support, and more are disabled until you upgrade.

Download: KORG Gadget Le (Free) | KORG Gadget ($40)

5. SunVox

If you’re interested in creating chiptune, SunVox is the best iOS app for the job. Fair warning though: this app isn’t for the faint of heart. SunVox is a fully fledged pattern-based sequencer that uses a tracker interface.

The app includes numerous modular synthesizers and effects processors, including an analog generator, a drum synthesizer with 120 built-in sounds, echo, distortion, reverb, vocal filter, and a module for building your own synths and effects.

If you’re going to jump into SunVox (and there’s a lot to get stuck into) be sure you familiarize yourself with the user manual. You can also download SunVox for Windows, Linux, and macOS for free.

Download: SunVox ($6)

6. KORG iKaossilator

Just like Figure, iKaossilator is a musical tool that breaks down the boundaries. It’s based on KORG’s pricey Kaossilator hardware, which uses an XY touchpad to manipulate the 150 built-in sounds to create weird and wonderful pieces of music.

The provides you with five channels of sound, which you can toggle at will. You can then take these channels, remix them across your projects, and control your loops in real time. iKaossilator is as much of a performance tool as it is a creative one.

It’s probably most valuable when generating ideas, rather than creating finished productions. It’s possible to export your creations, or upload them directly to SoundCloud if you’re into that.

Download: iKaossilator ($20)

7. AudioBus

AudioBus isn’t a music making app, but it’s instrumental in many productions. The app allows you to route audio from one source to another, so you can take the output from a synthesizer or drum machine, add effects with an audio processor, then record it in your workstation.

AudioBus 2 is the cheaper, more linear version, but it hasn’t seen an update since 2017. Meanwhile, AudioBus 3 is currently maintained and does everything AudioBus 2 does. It has more options for routing multiple apps, plus full support for MIDI.

Many apps on this list, like GarageBand and KORG Gadget, already support AudioBus. Check out the full list of AudioBus-compatible apps on the AudioBus website. Check out AUM ($19) if you’re looking for a similar app with baked-in recording abilities.

Download: AudioBus 2 ($5) | AudioBus 3 ($10)

8. Loopy HD

Loopy is the original looping sampler app for iPhone; Loopy HD works on the iPad too. The app’s premise is incredibly simple, and it’s won praise over the years for its reliable construction and low-latency approach to recording audio.

Loopy offers six, nine, or 12 blank loops, onto which you can record and layer sounds. These can come from your device’s microphone, other apps using AudioCopy and AudioBus, or recording interfaces like guitar inputs.

You can then manipulate and tweak your sounds, chance the tempo, merge tracks together, and overdub recordings on top of others. There’s MIDI control for using Loopy with a foot pedal, making it an ideal tool for live musicians and street performers.

Download: Loopy ($3) | Loopy HD ($4)

Get Started Making Music on iPhone

This is a small sample of the huge number of apps that enable you to use your mobile device to create music. We’ve avoided dedicated synthesizer and instrument apps in favor of apps that make creating music more accessible.

If you’d rather spend your time programming beats, check out our favorite iOS drum machines and groovebox apps too.

Read the full article: 8 Music Maker iPhone Apps to Create Music Anywhere

Apple Store app receives an update that includes new search interface, more

The Apple Store app for iOS has received an update. Version 5.1 brings a few changes to the search mechanism. Changes have also arrived for the WWDC app.

Apple Store App

The Apple Store app for iPhone and iPad has received an update. Version 5.1 brings a few changes to the search mechanism. Cupertino has also made some changes to its WWDC app.... Read the rest of this post here


"Apple Store app receives an update that includes new search interface, more" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
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