Flickr will hold off on deleting photos until March 12th

If you’ve got a Flickr account, hopefully you’re already aware: the free 1 terabyte plan is going away. If you’re on a free Flickr account, the company is only going to let you keep 1,000 photos at a time. Anything past that will be auto deleted, starting with the oldest stuff. The deadline for saving […]

If you’ve got a Flickr account, hopefully you’re already aware: the free 1 terabyte plan is going away. If you’re on a free Flickr account, the company is only going to let you keep 1,000 photos at a time. Anything past that will be auto deleted, starting with the oldest stuff.

The deadline for saving all your old photos was supposed to be yesterday. But due to a bunch of issues experienced by folks at the last minute, they’re pushing it back a bit.

In a statement, a rep from Flickr tells us:

Based on feedback from our members and complications some members experienced when downloading photos yesterday, we’ve extended our deletion eligibility deadline until March 12, 2019.

That gives you a little over a month to get around to downloading — but if yesterday’s issues were any indication, you might not want to wait until the last minute. Need help getting it done? Here’s how to do it.

(Disclosure: Flickr used to be owned by Oath, which owns TechCrunch. Flickr was acquired by SmugMug in April of last year.)

Flickr will hold off on deleting photos until March 12th

If you’ve got a Flickr account, hopefully you’re already aware: the free 1 terabyte plan is going away. If you’re on a free Flickr account, the company is only going to let you keep 1,000 photos at a time. Anything past that will be auto deleted, starting with the oldest stuff. The deadline for saving […]

If you’ve got a Flickr account, hopefully you’re already aware: the free 1 terabyte plan is going away. If you’re on a free Flickr account, the company is only going to let you keep 1,000 photos at a time. Anything past that will be auto deleted, starting with the oldest stuff.

The deadline for saving all your old photos was supposed to be yesterday. But due to a bunch of issues experienced by folks at the last minute, they’re pushing it back a bit.

In a statement, a rep from Flickr tells us:

Based on feedback from our members and complications some members experienced when downloading photos yesterday, we’ve extended our deletion eligibility deadline until March 12, 2019.

That gives you a little over a month to get around to downloading — but if yesterday’s issues were any indication, you might not want to wait until the last minute. Need help getting it done? Here’s how to do it.

(Disclosure: Flickr used to be owned by Oath, which owns TechCrunch. Flickr was acquired by SmugMug in April of last year.)

PSA: Go back up your Flickr photos before they’re deleted

Do you have a Flickr account? Does it have over 1,000 photos? Go back them up, or you might lose a bunch of them forever. We’ve known for a few months now that Flickr was prepping to drop its storage limit for non-Pro accounts from 1TB to just 1,000 photos following its acquisition by SmugMug […]

Do you have a Flickr account? Does it have over 1,000 photos?

Go back them up, or you might lose a bunch of them forever.

We’ve known for a few months now that Flickr was prepping to drop its storage limit for non-Pro accounts from 1TB to just 1,000 photos following its acquisition by SmugMug — and that anything over the 1,000 photo cap would be deleted, starting with the oldest.

If you kept telling yourself that you’d “back it all up later”, “later” is now. Flickr has said they’d start deleting things after February 5th… and, well, that’s today.

So how do you back it all up? You can go through and download them one by one, but that’s pretty painful. Fortunately, there’s a quicker way:

  1. Go to Flickr.com on a desktop browser
  2. Log in
  3. Tap your profile picture in the upper right, then hit “Settings”
  4. Scroll down, and look for “Your Flickr Data” in the bottom right.
  5. Double check that the email address listed is your current one. If not, change it.
  6. Hit the “Request my Flickr data” button.
  7. Wait.

Within a few hours, you should get an email with a big ol’ zip file with all of your pictures. Take those and put them somewhere else — an external hard drive, Google Photos, a spare SD card, all of the above, whatever. Just go back them up. Even photos that you don’t really care about now can end up meaning a lot in a few years.

SmugMug outlined its thinking on why the 1 terabyte limit wasn’t working (and how the new 1,000 photo limit was chosen) in a post back in November.

(Disclosure: Though Flickr is now owned by SmugMug, it was owned by Yahoo/Oath before that. Oath owns TechCrunch. I don’t think there’s a conflict there, I just like to make these things clear.)

PSA: Go back up your Flickr photos before they’re deleted

Do you have a Flickr account? Does it have over 1,000 photos? Go back them up, or you might lose a bunch of them forever. We’ve known for a few months now that Flickr was prepping to drop its storage limit for non-Pro accounts from 1TB to just 1,000 photos following its acquisition by SmugMug […]

Do you have a Flickr account? Does it have over 1,000 photos?

Go back them up, or you might lose a bunch of them forever.

We’ve known for a few months now that Flickr was prepping to drop its storage limit for non-Pro accounts from 1TB to just 1,000 photos following its acquisition by SmugMug — and that anything over the 1,000 photo cap would be deleted, starting with the oldest.

If you kept telling yourself that you’d “back it all up later”, “later” is now. Flickr has said they’d start deleting things after February 5th… and, well, that’s today.

So how do you back it all up? You can go through and download them one by one, but that’s pretty painful. Fortunately, there’s a quicker way:

  1. Go to Flickr.com on a desktop browser
  2. Log in
  3. Tap your profile picture in the upper right, then hit “Settings”
  4. Scroll down, and look for “Your Flickr Data” in the bottom right.
  5. Double check that the email address listed is your current one. If not, change it.
  6. Hit the “Request my Flickr data” button.
  7. Wait.

Within a few hours, you should get an email with a big ol’ zip file with all of your pictures. Take those and put them somewhere else — an external hard drive, Google Photos, a spare SD card, all of the above, whatever. Just go back them up. Even photos that you don’t really care about now can end up meaning a lot in a few years.

SmugMug outlined its thinking on why the 1 terabyte limit wasn’t working (and how the new 1,000 photo limit was chosen) in a post back in November.

(Disclosure: Though Flickr is now owned by SmugMug, it was owned by Yahoo/Oath before that. Oath owns TechCrunch. I don’t think there’s a conflict there, I just like to make these things clear.)

PSA: Go back up your Flickr photos before they’re deleted

Do you have a Flickr account? Does it have over 1,000 photos? Go back them up, or you might lose a bunch of them forever. We’ve known for a few months now that Flickr was prepping to drop its storage limit for non-Pro accounts from 1TB to just 1,000 photos following its acquisition by SmugMug […]

Do you have a Flickr account? Does it have over 1,000 photos?

Go back them up, or you might lose a bunch of them forever.

We’ve known for a few months now that Flickr was prepping to drop its storage limit for non-Pro accounts from 1TB to just 1,000 photos following its acquisition by SmugMug — and that anything over the 1,000 photo cap would be deleted, starting with the oldest.

If you kept telling yourself that you’d “back it all up later”, “later” is now. Flickr has said they’d start deleting things after February 5th… and, well, that’s today.

So how do you back it all up? You can go through and download them one by one, but that’s pretty painful. Fortunately, there’s a quicker way:

  1. Go to Flickr.com on a desktop browser
  2. Log in
  3. Tap your profile picture in the upper right, then hit “Settings”
  4. Scroll down, and look for “Your Flickr Data” in the bottom right.
  5. Double check that the email address listed is your current one. If not, change it.
  6. Hit the “Request my Flickr data” button.
  7. Wait.

Within a few hours, you should get an email with a big ol’ zip file with all of your pictures. Take those and put them somewhere else — an external hard drive, Google Photos, a spare SD card, all of the above, whatever. Just go back them up. Even photos that you don’t really care about now can end up meaning a lot in a few years.

SmugMug outlined its thinking on why the 1 terabyte limit wasn’t working (and how the new 1,000 photo limit was chosen) in a post back in November.

(Disclosure: Though Flickr is now owned by SmugMug, it was owned by Yahoo/Oath before that. Oath owns TechCrunch. I don’t think there’s a conflict there, I just like to make these things clear.)

How to download your Flickr photos and videos

If you’ve decided to move away from Flickr or just back up your items on your computer, here are a few ways to download your Flickr photos and videos.

Flickr on MacBook screen

With the recent changes to Flickr, users with free accounts are now limited to 1,000 photos or videos unless they opt for a paid plan. If you have more than the limited number of items and aren’t quite ready to shell out the cash for an unlimited plan, you may want to take your photos elsewhere.

If so, here’s how you can download your Flickr photos and videos.... Read the rest of this post here


"How to download your Flickr photos and videos" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
Make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

How to download your Flickr photos and videos

If you’ve decided to move away from Flickr or just back up your items on your computer, here are a few ways to download your Flickr photos and videos.

Flickr on MacBook screen

With the recent changes to Flickr, users with free accounts are now limited to 1,000 photos or videos unless they opt for a paid plan. If you have more than the limited number of items and aren’t quite ready to shell out the cash for an unlimited plan, you may want to take your photos elsewhere.

If so, here’s how you can download your Flickr photos and videos.... Read the rest of this post here


"How to download your Flickr photos and videos" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
Make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

SmugSmug on Flickr’s free photo sharing limit

SmugSmug is cool with some users leaving Flickr after it’s downgraded free accounts to 1,000 uploads, down from unlimited. The CEO believes their new focus on photographers and people who care about photography will pay off.

Photo haring service Flickr, now owned by SmugSmug, caused a commotion when it recently announced that its 1TB accounts will be downgraded to up to a thousand photos and videos. The free 1TB tier used to support unlimited downloads, but not anymore as SmugSmug looks to monetize its Flickr acquisition by introducing new perks for Pro accounts.... Read the rest of this post here


"SmugSmug on Flickr’s free photo sharing limit" is an article by iDownloadBlog.com.
Make sure to follow us on Twitter, Facebook, and Google+.

Flickr Promises Not to Delete Creative Commons Photos

Flickr’s new owners have promised not to delete photos uploaded under a Creative Commons license. So, while SmugMug has taken flak for limiting free Flickr users to 1,000 photos, the company deserves credit for not gutting the Commons archive. Flickr Recognizes the Value of Commons Photos In a Flickr blog post, Don MacAskill, the CEO of SmugMug, explains that photos uploaded under a Commons license are safe from the chop. Flickr Commons Photos will not be deleted, and Creative Commons photos uploaded before November 1, 2018, are also safe. Thank you to @DonMacAskill @SmugMug for their commitment to preserving the…

Read the full article: Flickr Promises Not to Delete Creative Commons Photos

Flickr’s new owners have promised not to delete photos uploaded under a Creative Commons license. So, while SmugMug has taken flak for limiting free Flickr users to 1,000 photos, the company deserves credit for not gutting the Commons archive.

Flickr Recognizes the Value of Commons Photos

In a Flickr blog post, Don MacAskill, the CEO of SmugMug, explains that photos uploaded under a Commons license are safe from the chop. Flickr Commons Photos will not be deleted, and Creative Commons photos uploaded before November 1, 2018, are also safe.

The caveat is that if a free user has more than 1,000 photos, they won’t be able to upload any more photos, CC license or not, unless and until they upgrade to a Pro account. Thankfully, Flickr is offering free Pro accounts to charitable organizations.

Ryan Merkley, the CEO of Creative Commons, said:

“We’ll be working with Flickr to look for ways to continue growing and archiving the commons. When Flickr users apply CC licenses to their works, they are inviting everyone to use their works freely and with very few restrictions. That’s an incredible gift to the world, and that generosity should be acknowledged and preserved into perpetuity for everyone to enjoy.”

Unfortunately, this offer only applies to photos uploaded with a CC license before November 1, 2018. Which means you can’t suddenly switch all of your Flickr photos to a CC license in order to circumvent the new limit on free accounts.

While we can understand Flickr’s reasons for this, it’s actually a bit of a shame. Waiving the 1,000 photos limit for all CC-licensed images, no matter when they were uploaded, could have led to an influx of photos being offered under a CC license.

Act Now Before Flickr Starts Deleting Your Photos

Keeping photos licensed under The Flickr Commons or Creative Commons online and available to everyone is important. Especially as many of us have already used these images on our websites, and so don’t want to see them suddenly disappear from view.

Assuming you haven’t uploaded your photos under a Commons license you may need to download your Flickr photos at their original resolutions before the new limits come into force. Because, come February 2019, Flickr is set to start actively deleting your photos.

Read the full article: Flickr Promises Not to Delete Creative Commons Photos

Flickr says it won’t delete Creative Commons photos

Flickr will spare both the Flickr Commons and Creative Commons photos from deletion, the now SmugMug-owned company announced today. However, its new storage limitations on free accounts may impact its use as a home for photos with a Creative Commons license in the future. When the company unveiled its big revamp last week, one of […]

Flickr will spare both the Flickr Commons and Creative Commons photos from deletion, the now SmugMug-owned company announced today. However, its new storage limitations on free accounts may impact its use as a home for photos with a Creative Commons license in the future.

When the company unveiled its big revamp last week, one of the immediate concerns among users was what the changes meant for the Creative Commons photos hosted on Flickr.

Under its new management, Flickr decided to stop offering free users a terabyte of storage, and instead will begin charging users who want to host more than 1,000 photos on its site. Users with more than 1,000 photos either had to choose to upgrade to a Pro account to retain those photos on the site, or see them deleted.

Ryan Merkley, CEO at Creative Commons, expressed some concern last week over what this meant for the millions of CC images hosted on Flickr.

Would they be gone, too?

Flickr today says the answer is “no.”

It vows not to delete either its own Flickr Commons archive or any photos uploaded with a Creative Commons license before November 1, 2018.

The Flickr Commons is a resource consisting of photos from institutions that want to share their digital collections with the world, such as NASA, the National Parks Service, the UK National Archives, and The British Library, for example. These organizations were either already Pro account holders or have now received a free Pro account from Flickr, the company says.

If any of these photos disappear from Flickr, it will be because the organization itself chose to delete them.

Meanwhile, any photos (or videos) licensed before November 1, will also remain, even if the photographer has more than 1,000 under their account. But users who want to continue to upload photos – Creative Commons or otherwise – past the 1,000 mark going forward will have to upgrade to a Pro account.

Flickr is also carving out an exception for non-profits  – aka 501(c)(3) charitable organizations – to offer them free storage, like SmugMug does. It’s already working with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), 350.org, and Second Harvest, on this front.

“Freely licensed photos are deeply important to us. After SmugMug acquired Flickr, one of the first meetings we had was with Ryan Merkley, the CEO of Creative Commons. We want to keep that partnership alive and strong, and we are actively working on how to grow it for the future,” wrote SmugMug CEO Don MacAskill in a blog post. 

However, the move to limit free storage on any uploads, including CC photos, could impact Flickr’s use as a home to this sort of content in the future.

It’s possible that some photographers will opt for another service like 500px’s $3.99/month tier with unlimited uploads, instead of Flickr’s $5.99/month Pro plan. Or perhaps, they’ll publish photos in public albums on Google Photos, under one of its affordable TB plans or on newcomer Unsplash’s website, where they’re licensed under its own free-to-use license type. Or maybe they’ll just host photos on their own sites instead.

Merkley, however, promises to focus on continuing to grow the Commons and finding solutions.

“We’ll be working with Flickr to look for ways to continue growing and archiving the commons,” Merkley said. “When Flickr users apply CC licenses to their works, they are inviting everyone to use their works freely and with very few restrictions. That’s an incredible gift to the world, and that generosity should be acknowledged and preserved into perpetuity for everyone to enjoy,” he said.