How to Install WordPress on Bluehost

setup-bluehost-email

Thanks to a streamlined, 1-click install, installing WordPress on Bluehost is incredibly simple. However, there may be cases where the Bluehost WordPress 1-click install isn’t right for your situation. In this article, you’ll learn how to install WordPress on Bluehost using various methods. We’ll also cover what makes BlueHost unique for WordPress hosting. 1-Click Bluehost WordPress Install On any web host where there’s no 1-click WordPress install option, you’ll need to set up WordPress manually. You’re going to need two things: a domain name and web hosting. Bluehost provides both. Best of all, their basic web hosting plan is extremely…

Read the full article: How to Install WordPress on Bluehost

setup-bluehost-email

Thanks to a streamlined, 1-click install, installing WordPress on Bluehost is incredibly simple. However, there may be cases where the Bluehost WordPress 1-click install isn’t right for your situation.

In this article, you’ll learn how to install WordPress on Bluehost using various methods. We’ll also cover what makes BlueHost unique for WordPress hosting.

1-Click Bluehost WordPress Install

On any web host where there’s no 1-click WordPress install option, you’ll need to set up WordPress manually.

You’re going to need two things: a domain name and web hosting. Bluehost provides both. Best of all, their basic web hosting plan is extremely cheap. Sign up using this link for a special Bluehost offer.

When you click the 1-Click Install sign-up button on the Bluehost site, you’ll see a screen where you can set up your domain name for your new site.

choose bluehost domain name

If you don’t have a domain name yet, then choose the new domain option. With your first year of hosting with Bluehost, a single domain is free.

The only catch is that your domain name needs to be available for registration.

If you already have a domain name, then go ahead and type it into the i have a domain name field.

The next steps are straightforward. Just fill out your personal details, choose the hosting plan you want, and fill in your payment details.

Finally, fill out a secure password to access your site controls.

set up bluehost password

Once you’re done, you’ll see your main site portal page.

If you’re familiar with Cpanel on most web hosts, you’ll notice how much more simplified this control panel is (you can click on Advanced to see more of a traditional Cpanel).

bluehost main panel

You’ll notice there’s a Log in to WordPress button. That’s because your WordPress site for the domain you chose, is already installed and ready to use.

It’s literally a one-click install. You’re done. Almost.

Transferring Your Domain to Bluehost

If you chose to take advantage of registering a single domain name for free, then you can stop here. The WordPress site is connected to that domain and live.

However, if you have an existing domain already registered, you’ll need to point it or transfer it to Bluehost.

  • Assigning: This means you change the nameserver settings at your existing domain registrar to point to Bluehost
  • Transferring: This means you change your registrar for that domain from your previous one to Bluehost

If you want to transfer the domain from your old registrar to Bluehost:

  1. Click on Domains in the left navigation bar
  2. Choose Transfer a new domain to your account
  3. Fill in the Enter domain to transfer field

Bluehost then manages your domain transfer for you. This is the easiest approach if you don’t know how domain transfers work, or you simply don’t want to deal with it.

If you’d like to keep all of your domains with the same registrar or don’t want to change domain registrars for any reason, you don’t have to.

Just go to the registrar where you bought your domain, and edit the nameservers there. You’ll usually find this under your Domain settings, by clicking on Manage DNS.

change nameservers

You’ll need to enter two nameservers.

The details for the first Bluehost nameserver are:

  • ns1.bluehost.com
  • 162.88.60.37

The details for the second Bluehost nameserver are:

  • ns2.bluehost.com
  • 162.88.61.37

It can take from 24 to 48 hours for the change to propagate. Once it does, the next time you type your domain into a browser URL field, you’ll see your new Bluehost website come up.

Transferring Your Website to Bluehost

If you’re transferring a website to Bluehost, the process is a little bit more involved. However it’s still only a moderate effort.

This process involves the following steps.

  1. Back up your old WordPress files
  2. Back up your old SQL database
  3. Create a new, matching SQL database on Bluehost
  4. Upload your old WordPress files to Bluehost

Step 1: Back Up Previous WordPress Site

To back up your WordPress files, just connect to your old host with your favorite FTP client.

Upload all of the site files to your local computer in a location you’ll remember..

wordpress-site-upload

Next, go into the Cpanel on your old host, and download the SQL database for that site.

Step 2: Back Up Previous WordPress Database

You’ll typically find this by clicking on the Backups icon.

backups in cpanel

Scroll down to the list of your SQL databases, and click on the relevant database link to download it.

Typically it’ll get downloaded as a zipped file. When you upload the file at Bluehost, it’ll know how to handle it.

save old website database

Now you’re ready to upload your old website into your Bluehost account.

Step 3: Import Your Database

Log into Bluehost, and click on Advanced in the left navigation panel.

Under Databases, click on MySQL Databases.

  1. Create a database using any website name you like.
  2. Scroll down and create a new MySQL User and password.
  3. Scroll down and under Add User To Database, assign the new user to the new database.
  4. Check the ALL PRIVILEGES box on the final Manage User Privileges page.

Now, go to the directory on your computer with the old website files you backed up, and find the wp-config.php file in the parent directory.

Edit the three lines in the config file where the database, user name, and user password is defined.

edit config file

Now import the database you backed up by clicking on Advanced in your Bluehost Portal Page, and clicking on phpMyAdmin.

Select the new database you created, click on Choose File and select the database you backed up previously.

Make sure Partial Import is not selected, and the database format is SQL.

import database

Click Go, and in a few seconds you should see a message that the import was successful.

Step 4: Import Your WordPress Files

Under the Files menu, click on FTP Accounts and scroll down to the list of FTP accounts.

For the one that is mapped to your home directory for the website you’re transferring to, click on Configure FTP Client and note the login details. Your password will be the one you signed up with when you opened your Bluehost account.

Open your favorite FTP client and connect.

Delete all of the files under the public-html directory on your Bluehost account. Replace those files with all of the files you backed up from your other WordPress site.

upload wordpress files

Once all of the files are uploaded, your site is fully transferred and live on Bluehost!

Just go back to Home in your site portal to see your site displayed in the preview window.

new bluehost wordpress site

Installing a New WordPress Theme

Transferring to a new host is also a great opportunity to refresh your site theme.

When you click on the Home tab in your Bluehost portal, you’ll notice there’s a Themes link in your website preview window.

bluehost themes

This will take you to the Bluehost Themes & Templates marketplace. You’ll find thousands of templates here available for purchase.

Regardless where you purchase it from, the upload process to your Bluehost WordPress site is the same.

Use your favorite FTP client to upload the theme folder containing all of the theme files, to the /wp-content/themes/ directory.

transfer theme

Once all files are uploaded, open up your WordPress admin panel, click Themes, find the theme you’ve uploaded, and click Activate.

install theme plugins

You may see a message in WordPress that you’re missing a few plugins for the theme. Just click Begin installing plugins to install them all.

Installing WordPress on Bluehost: Simple and Done

As you can see, there are a lot of parallels between a Bluehost WordPress installation or a migration.

The main difference is how the Bluehost Portal looks, and the differences between a BlueHost Cpanel and a standard one. Luckily, Bluehost offers all of the tools you need to start a new site, or migrate over an old one.

If after all this, you aren’t entirely sure you want to stick with Bluehost. Have no fear, we’ve provided a list of the best WordPress hosting providers available. Have a look at some of those to see if they suit your needs ever better.

Read the full article: How to Install WordPress on Bluehost

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Which Web Hosting Service Is Best for You?

bluehost-vs-hostgator

If you want to either launch a new website or migrate your existing site to a new provider, you will see two names pop up everywhere: Bluehost HostGator They are two of the largest web hosting providers in the world. Between them, they provide the backend to tens of millions of sites. But which one should you use? A lot depends on the service you need. So, keep reading as we compare Bluehost and HostGator and establish a winner. Bluehost vs. HostGator: Ease of Use As more and more people attempt to create their own website, a service’s ease-of-use is…

Read the full article: Bluehost vs. HostGator: Which Web Hosting Service Is Best for You?

If you want to either launch a new website or migrate your existing site to a new provider, you will see two names pop up everywhere:

They are two of the largest web hosting providers in the world. Between them, they provide the backend to tens of millions of sites.

But which one should you use? A lot depends on the service you need. So, keep reading as we compare Bluehost and HostGator and establish a winner.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Ease of Use

As more and more people attempt to create their own website, a service’s ease-of-use is an increasingly important feature to consider. Beginners need to be able to get their site online with the minimum of fuss.

Both Bluehost and HostGator use cPanel. cPanel is a widely-used Linux-based platform that offers a range of administrative tools through a graphical interface. While HostGator’s cPanel screen is fairly standard, Bluehost has shifted some menus around to customize its version.

The two hosting companies provide access to the MOJO Marketplace. You can use the marketplace to install WordPress, Weebly, Joomla, Drupal, and many more site-building tools.

Bluehost and HostGator also offer site migration services. Using their migration services means you don’t have to fiddle with FTP and other complicated web hosting practices, saving you both stress and time. HostGator is free if you migrate within the first 30 days, Bluehost charges a surprisingly high $149.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Server Uptime

If you already run a successful site, one of the most important things to research about your new host is its uptime stats. Downtime leads to lost business opportunities and lost revenue.

Don’t believe us? To use an extreme example, for every five minutes that Amazon is offline, it loses $330,000. Your site might not be on the same scale as Amazon, but uptime definitely matters.

HostGator’s Service Level Agreement (SLA) says you’re entitled to 99.99 percent uptime per year. Bluehost has a projected uptime of 99.982 percent per year; that equates to 1.6 hours of downtime every 12 months.

At the time of writing, the most recent uptime reports (for July 2018) showed HostGator had an uptime of 99.98 percent (with a total downtime of eight minutes). Bluehost had 99.97 percent uptime and 13 minutes of downtime.

Remember, these are company-wide averages. The uptime will vary from plan to plan. The more expensive plans typically offer more reliable uptime.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Website Speed

Closely tied to uptime is your website’s speed. Like with uptime, a slow site can cause visitors to hit the back button before they’ve had a chance to see what you’re offering.

A recent study showed HostGator had a maximum response time of 3.2 seconds and a minimum response time of 258.07 milliseconds. In contrast, Bluehost had a maximum response time of 2.6 seconds and a minimum time of 915.53 milliseconds.

Despite Bluehost’s lower maximum time, the results revealed Bluehost’s response time increased as traffic increased. HostGator had no such correlation. Worryingly, with just 10 concurrent users, the response time on Bluehost went as high as 3500ms. At 20 users, it jumped to 1060ms.

HostGator’s servers also returned the first byte of data faster than Bluehost, taking 0.377 seconds compared to Bluehost’s 0.401 seconds. The speed it takes to load the first byte of data is unaffected by other things that can cause a page to load slowly (like plugins and media files). This result is entirely determined by a company’s servers.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Security Features

HostGator and Bluehost provide some basic security features to protect you against hackers and cybercriminals. The protections are very similar.

Regardless of which web hosting provider you choose, you will get a free SSL certificate. HostGator also offers free weekly offsite backups of all your content.

Both companies provide access to SiteLock. It will check for spam, validate your business information, monitor search engine blacklists to avoid an unexpected quarantining, and check for malware.

The two services also both have built-in DDoS protection. Bluehost doesn’t go into much detail about its protections, but HostGator uses a custom firewall and mod security rule sets to protect its users. Each individual datacenter can also enable flood protection on an individual basis if an attack is suspected.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Plans and Costs

Okay, so how do the Bluehost and HostGator compare in terms of cost? As you would expect, both companies offer a diverse range of plans for everyone from hobbyists to large organizations.

If you’re looking for an entry-level shared web hosting plan, Bluehost and HostGator each provide three choices. The plans offer cheaper rates if you sign up for more months.

Without considering the sign-up discounts, which both companies frequently offer and can be worth 50 percent or more, the cheapest Bluehost plan is $7.99 per month, and the most affordable HostGator plan is $6.95 per month.

For that price, HostGator gives you unlimited storage and unlimited email space, while Bluehost only offers 50GB of SSD storage and 100MB per account of email space. Both entry-level plans only allow one domain.

Note: Check out our guide if you’re not sure how to set up your email on Bluehost.

Moving up, the mid-level shared hosting plans on Bluehost, and HostGator cost $10.99 and $9.95 per month respectively. The top shared hosting plans are $14.99 and $14.95.

At the other end of the scale, HostGator’s top-end dedicated server hosting plan costs $289.99 per month. The money will buy you 8GB of RAM, a four-core CPU, 240GB of disk space, and 3TB of bandwidth.

Bluehost’s competing product is $209.99 per month. You’ll get a four-core, eight thread, 3.3GHz CPU, 1TB of storage, and 15TB of bandwidth.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: Customer Support

Things will go wrong occasionally. It’s one of the inevitabilities of running a website. And when things do go wrong, you need someone to fix them ASAP.

Therefore, the level of support offered by your web hosting company is important.

We’re pleased to report that both Bluehost and HostGator offer excellent customer support. There’s little to choose between them. Each company provides 24/7 support in the form of live chat, email tickets, and telephone reps.

If anything, Bluehost’s support services are slightly more intuitive and thus easier to use.

Bluehost vs. HostGator: The Winner Is…

Look, there’s very little separating the two platforms. We can honestly recommend both Bluehost and HostGator as excellent options if you’re looking for a professional-quality web hosting provider.

But if we had to pick a winner of the Bluehost vs. HostGator faceoff?

HostGator. Its servers are a bit faster, it suffers slightly less downtime, and its plans—at least at the entry-level—are a fraction cheaper.

To Bluehost’s credit, we think it’s support services are more organized than HostGator’s. Bluehost’s user interface is also cleaner and more professional. WordPress also recommends Bluehost.

If you’d like to sign up for a web hosting plan with Bluehost, you’re in luck: Get up to 63% off using this special discount link!

Read the full article: Bluehost vs. HostGator: Which Web Hosting Service Is Best for You?

The Best WordPress Hosting Providers

wordpress-hosting

WordPress is the world’s most popular web-based content management system (CMS). It powers more than 30 percent of the internet’s top 10 million sites. The WordPress software (which you shouldn’t confuse with WordPress.com hosting) is open source, incredibly easy to set up, and entirely free to use. All you need is a domain name and a web hosting plan. Here are seven of the best WordPress hosting providers. 1. Bluehost Bluehost is arguably the most recognizable name in the world of WordPress web hosting; the company has been around since 1996. Indeed, WordPress actively recommends Bluehost on its site and…

Read the full article: The Best WordPress Hosting Providers

WordPress is the world’s most popular web-based content management system (CMS). It powers more than 30 percent of the internet’s top 10 million sites.

The WordPress software (which you shouldn’t confuse with WordPress.com hosting) is open source, incredibly easy to set up, and entirely free to use. All you need is a domain name and a web hosting plan.

Here are seven of the best WordPress hosting providers.

1. Bluehost

bluehost monthly costs

Bluehost is arguably the most recognizable name in the world of WordPress web hosting; the company has been around since 1996. Indeed, WordPress actively recommends Bluehost on its site and has done since 2005.

If you’re creating a website for the first time, you probably won’t have much traffic to start with. In that case, the company’s shared hosting plan will suffice. It offers 50GB of space, unmetered bandwidth, and five email accounts. Bluehost has an average uptime of >99.99 percent and average load times of 419ms.

The plan costs $7.99 per month. However, significant discounts are available for new customers, making it one of the cheapest WordPress hosting plans. (Get up to 63% off using this link!)

If you need something with a bit more power, check out the VPS (virtual private server) plans. For $19.99 per month, you get 2GB of RAM, 30GB of SSD storage, two cores, and free SSL.

2. InMotion Hosting

inmotion monthly costs

Unusually, InMotion Hosting offers six dedicated WordPress hosting plans. Most companies only offer a couple.

The cheapest plan is WP-1000S. It will set you back $8.99 per month and is suitable for up to 20,000 monthly visitors. It includes unlimited bandwidth, unlimited email accounts, and 40GB of SSD storage space.

At the other end of the scale is the WP-6000S plan. It costs $119.99 per month and is suitable for up to 1.2 million monthly page views.

The three most expensive plans all include a dedicated IP address and a free subscription to Jetpack Professional. (Get up to 50% off using this link!)

Regardless of which plan you choose, WordPress comes preinstalled; you won’t need to fiddle with third-party installers. You can also decide whether you want to optimize your site for traffic from either the eastern or western hemisphere.

InMotion’s uptime runs at 99.97 percent. Its average load time is 752ms.

3. WordPlus

wordplus homepage

None of the big companies offer free WordPress hosting, but that doesn’t mean there aren’t free web hosting services out there.

Of course, you could just head to WordPress.com. Its servers are powerful enough to handle any traffic you throw at it. But there are some trade-offs—for example, you can only install your own plugins and run Jetpack if you pay a monthly fee. The free version is limited to 3GB of space, and you cannot display your own ads.

Instead, check out WordPlus. The free flavor gives you 128MB of SSD space, unlimited bandwidth, free SSL, free CDN, and access to cPanel. You can also use all WordPress’ best plugins.

If that doesn’t cover your needs, other popular free WordPress hosting providers include 000webhost, HostAwesome, and Byet. The four providers all have very different features and capabilities, so make sure you do your research before choosing.

4. SiteGround

siteground monthly costs

In addition to the entry-level shared web hosting plans, lots of companies also offer managed WordPress hosting.

Typically, managed WordPress hosting is more expensive than its shared hosting counterpart, even though the list of features is often very similar.

The difference comes in the level of support you receive. If you’re not technically inclined and would rather focus on producing content rather than managing the backend of a website, a managed WordPress hosting plan could be for you.

The hosting provider will manage all the behind-the-scenes stuff, including security, speed optimization, updates, and backups. The security support is perhaps the most important, it’s easy to overlook when you start a new website.

On the downside, you can only run WordPress. If you decide to convert to a different CMS in the future, you’ll need to migrate your entire site to a new plan. You might also find that your host will block some plugins that reduce performance.

If you’d like a managed WordPress hosting plan, check out SiteGround. With 99.98 percent uptime and a load time of 722ms, it’s one of the best performing hosts on this list.

It’s cheapest managed hosting plan—called StartUp—costs $11.95 per month. It’s suitable for 10,000 monthly visits and offers 10GB of space.

5. A2 Hosting

a2 hosting monthly costs

A2 Hosting is a company I can personally vouch for. I use it to host four websites and have never had any issues.

When I first migrated to A2 Hosting from my previous provider, the company was quick to resolve technical issues that arose from the transfer, even though it later transpired that the problems were caused by the old host and were not of A2’s making.

Since then, every time I have opened a support ticket, A2 has responded quickly and accurately. I’ve lost track of the number of times the reps on the company’s 24/7 live chat have solved my issues in the middle of the night.

Regarding plans, A2 offers shared hosting, VPS hosting, and dedicated hosting. The entry-level shared hosting plan includes 25 email addresses, a 2.1 GHz core, five databases, and a server with a guaranteed 64GB of RAM. Regardless of which plan you pick, you can easily install WordPress using Softaculous.

Interestingly, A2 Hosting has compiled two of its own WordPress plugins that are worth using. A2 Fixed W3 Total Cache is a tweaked version of the popular W3 Total Cache plugin, while A2 Optimized WP offers performance improvements such as minifying files and pages, GZIP compression, image compression, and security improvements.

Finally, with an uptime of 99.90 percent and an average load time of 413ms, A2 Hosting is unquestionably one of the best WordPress hosting providers out there.

6. GoDaddy

godaddy monthly costs

Another managed WordPress hosting provider worth considering is GoDaddy.

The company is more commonly associated with domain names rather than hosting plans, but its managed plan can comfortably compete with other companies’ offerings on both price and features.

The cheapest GoDaddy WordPress hosting plan costs $8.99 per month. It is suitable for up to 25,000 visitors per month. It offers 10GB of storage and 99.99 percent uptime.

Because the plan is managed, you can expect nightly backups, automatic malware scanning and removal, a staging environment to test changes, and automatic DDoS protection.

7. HostGator

hostgator monthly costs

Our final recommendation is HostGator. Like Bluehost, it’s a well-established name in the industry and supports more than 10 million sites.

The entry-level cloud plan $9.95 per month. You will get two CPU cores, 2GB of RAM, free SSL, and unlimited bandwidth and storage. It can handle 100,000 visits per month.

If you need more power, check out the Business plan instead. For $22.95 per month, you will get 6GB of RAM, six CPU cores, and a dedicated IP address. You can also have an unlimited number of parked domains. It’s suitable for 500,000 visits per month.

Lastly, HostGator has some of the most impressive performance stats in this list. It boasts an uptime of 99.96 percent and a load time of 462ms.

Making the Right WordPress Hosting Choice

The world of WordPress hosting is a competitive place. There is not a great deal of difference between any of the mainstream providers; they all offer similar features for a similar price.

The biggest decision you need to make is whether to buy managed WordPress hosting or regular hosting. Your level of technical expertise and willingness to learn should guide your thought process.

For more information about web hosting, check out our articles on the best web hosting services and the reasons free web hosting is bad for your first website.

Read the full article: The Best WordPress Hosting Providers

How to Set Up Your Bluehost Webmail Email Account

setup-bluehost-email

Bluehost is one of the world’s leading web hosting providers. With its wide range of plans, the company is an excellent choice regardless of the type of site you own. WordPress even recommends Bluehost as one of the best providers for running self-hosted WordPress content. Like all web hosting providers, Bluehost offers its users personalized email addresses. Keep reading, and we’ll explain how to create your email address, how to access Bluehost webmail, and how to add your Bluehost email to Gmail. How to Create an Email Account on Bluehost The number of email addresses you can create depends on…

Read the full article: How to Set Up Your Bluehost Webmail Email Account

setup-bluehost-email

Bluehost is one of the world’s leading web hosting providers. With its wide range of plans, the company is an excellent choice regardless of the type of site you own. WordPress even recommends Bluehost as one of the best providers for running self-hosted WordPress content.

Like all web hosting providers, Bluehost offers its users personalized email addresses. Keep reading, and we’ll explain how to create your email address, how to access Bluehost webmail, and how to add your Bluehost email to Gmail.

How to Create an Email Account on Bluehost

The number of email addresses you can create depends on the hosting plan you’ve chosen. The entry-level Basic shared hosting plan lets you create five addresses, while the Starter cloud hosting plan offers 100 addresses. All Bluehost’s other plans allow you to create an unlimited number of email accounts.

When you’re ready to create your account, head to Bluehost.com and log into your account using the button in the top left-hand corner.

Once your account portal has loaded, locate the blue ribbon at the top of the page and click on Hosting. Then, in the sub-menu directly beneath the blue ribbon, click on Email. On your screen, you should now see all the tools you need to create and manage your email addresses.

To create a new email address, select Email Accounts on the menu in the left-hand panel and click Create an Email Account in the main window.

Create an Email Account Bluehost

Choose the prefix you want to use with your new address (the part before the @). Remember, you can also use periods (.) and underscores (_).

If you have multiple Bluehost domains, you also need to use the dropdown menu select the domain to which you want to connect your new email address.

Further down the page, you need to create a password. You can either use a password of your own choosing or ask Bluehost to generate one for you automatically.

Finally, at the bottom of the page, Bluehost asks you to determine the mailbox size and to select your preferred webmail client.

It’s generally advisable to select an unlimited mailbox size. You can leave the default Bluehost webmail client blank. It’s not essential to pick one at this stage; we’ll talk more about the options shortly.

When you’re happy, click on Create to finish the process.

How to Access Bluehost Webmail

Now it’s time to start using your email address. There are two easy ways to access Bluehost webmail and one slightly more complicated method.

The easiest way to access Bluehost webmail is to head to login.bluehost.com/hosting/webmail and enter your credentials.

You can also access your webmail via your main Bluehost portal by going to Hosting > Email > [Email address] > View Inbox.

Lastly, if you have the technical wherewithal, you can create your own email sub-domain and redirect it to the webmail client.

Choosing the Right Webmail Client

Bluehost offers three individual webmail clients: Roundcube, Horde, and SquirrelMail. They are the same three clients you will see on most mainstream web hosting providers. Bluehost will ask you to choose one of the three when you log into your webmail for the first time.

Each of the three clients has different strengths and weaknesses.

Horde is the most full-featured of the three. In addition to an address book (which all three clients offer), Horde also includes a calendar, task list, event reminders, news feed, and notes page. It also provides a spellchecker and mail filters.

At the other end of the scale, SquirrelMail is the most basic client. There are no productivity tools beyond the address book, there’s no way to filter your mail, and the interface only offers a two-pane view.

Roundcube strikes a middle ground. System administrators can use plugins to add extra productivity tools, the client supports drag-and-drop emails, and there’s a three-pane view with a spellchecker.

Roundcube Webmail Interface

Click on one of the client’s logos to make your selection. If you change your mind later, you can alter your webmail client in Hosting > Email > Email Accounts > [Email Address] > Webmail Client.

Use a Third-Party Client With Bluehost Webmail

If you don’t want to use Bluehost’s own webmail interface, you can try using third-party webmail clients instead.

The most popular third-party webmail client is Gmail, but services such as Outlook, Yahoo, and GMX will also work.

To add Bluehost your Gmail portal, you first need to decide whether to use the IMAP or POP3 protocol. Bluehost webmail supports both. Generally, IMAP is the preferred option; it will leave a copy of your email on Bluehost’s servers and lets you access your messages on multiple devices.

To add your Bluehost email address to Gmail, log into your Gmail account and navigate to Gear icon > Settings.

Next, click on the Accounts and Import tab and go to Check email from other accounts > Add an email account.

Add Bluehost mail to Gmail

A new window will open that will guide you through the setup process. Start by entering your email address and clicking Next.

Gmail will prompt you to add your server details. Here’s the information you’ll need:

Secure SSL/TLS Settings

  • Username: Your email address
  • Password: Your password
  • Incoming Server: mail.example.com (replace example.com with your own domain)
  • Incoming Port: 993 (IMAP) or 995 (POP3)
  • Outgoing Server: mail.example.com (replace example.com with your own domain)
  • Outgoing Port: 465 (SMTP)
  • Authentication: Your password

Standard Settings

  • Username: Your email address
  • Password: Your password
  • Incoming Server: mail.example.com (replace example.com with your own domain)
  • Incoming Port: 143 (IMAP) or 110 (POP3)
  • Outgoing Server: mail.example.com (replace example.com with your own domain)
  • Outgoing Port: 26 (SMTP)
  • Authentication: Your password

Warning: Using the SSL/TLS settings encrypts your messages and ensures no one other than the intended recipient can read them. It is not advisable to use the standard settings; however, sometimes a network’s configuration makes it unavoidable.

The server details will be the same regardless of which third-party webmail client you use, but the setup process will be slightly different.

For more information, check out our guide to combining multiple email accounts into a single inbox.

A More Professional Email Address

Using Bluehost webmail lets you create a personalized and professional email addresses. Your personal brand or small business will instantly gain more credibility from having its own domain rather than using @gmail or @outlook.

Remember, you can even create a personal email without needing to build a website.

Sign up with Bluehost using our special discounted rate for MakeUseOf readers and create your email address today!

Read the full article: How to Set Up Your Bluehost Webmail Email Account