The 15 Best Offline Music Player Apps for Android

non-streaming-music-apps

Are you tired of streaming music? It feels like everyone is talking about how to stream this, how to stream that, how to stream from PC to phone, etc. Yet while streaming can be convenient, it also eats up your mobile data. With mobile providers becoming more stingy with data plans and data caps, maybe it’s time we go back to offline music files. To do this, you’re going to need a good music player app—and for your convenience, we’ve done the research for you. Here are the best offline music player apps for Android, some which you may not…

Read the full article: The 15 Best Offline Music Player Apps for Android

Are you tired of streaming music? It feels like everyone is talking about how to stream this, how to stream that, how to stream from PC to phone, etc. Yet while streaming can be convenient, it also eats up your mobile data.

With mobile providers becoming more stingy with data plans and data caps, maybe it’s time we go back to offline music files.

To do this, you’re going to need a good music player app—and for your convenience, we’ve done the research for you. Here are the best offline music player apps for Android, some which you may not have heard about.

Note: Many popular music streaming apps like Spotify and YouTube Music offer the ability to download music for offline playback, but we’re not going to include those here.

The Best Free Offline Music Player Apps for Android

1. AIMP

At first glance, AIMP looks a bit overly simplistic. Flat interface designs are currently in, but AIMP’s approach feels a bit empty. Maybe that’s the point. This app gets straight to the point: it plays your music and doesn’t muck around with distractions.

It handles nearly all audio file types—including lossy and lossless formats—and it comes with a 29-band equalizer, which is rare to see in music players. It can also mix multi-channel files to stereo and/or mono. Overall, if you can get past the interface, it’s a solid choice that won’t let you down.

Download: AIMP (Free)

2. JetAudio

JetAudio comes in both free and premium versions, but you get so much in the free version that most users won’t even need the latter. The only downside is that the free version is supported by ads, but they aren’t intrusive, so they’re tolerable.

Here’s what you get: a 10-band equalizer with 32 presets, lossy and lossless support, effects like reverb and x-bass, playback speed control, automatic gain control, and more.

JetAudio Plus costs $4 and comes with a 20-band equalizer, built-in tag editor, over a dozen widgets, and a few other convenience features.

Download: JetAudio (Free)

3. Rocket Player

Rocket Player has been around for a few years now, and it has come a long way since its inception. A lot of the bugs have been fixed, it performs much smoother now, and the feature set has expanded by a lot.

For free, you get a 10-band equalizer with several presets, over 30 themes, a built-in tag editor, Chromecast support, a sleep timer, a nifty playlist manager, and even support for podcasts.

Get Rocket Player Premium for $4 to unlock gapless playback, replay gain, crossfading, tag editing, expanded support for audio formats. and more.

Download: Rocket Player (Free)

4. Phonograph

Phonograph is often considered to be the best-looking music player app, mainly because of the many built-in theme color sets and the fact that the interface colors dynamically change to match the content on the screen.

It’s pretty standard as far as features go, so don’t expect a lot of bells and whistles, but if you just want a simple listening experience that never gets in your way, Phonograph may be the app for you.

Download: Phonograph (Free)

5. Pixel Player

If you’ve come this far down the list and aren’t satified with the “lightweight” options further up, then we recommend giving Pixel Player a try. It’s lesser known, as evidenced by its number of reviews, but it’s pretty darn good.

It only supports basic file formats, but it has a 5-band equalizer with bass boost, gapless playback, a built-in tag editor, and a few options for customization, such as themes and colors. Most notably, Pixel Player can analyze what you listen to and suggest more music that matches your tastes.

Download: Pixel Player (Free)

6. Impulse Music Player

What makes Impulse Music Player different? Maybe it’s the fact that it’s designed to be a gesture-controlled music player, making it perfect for any situation where you’re preoccupied—such as when you’re driving!

In addition to gesture controls, Impulse Music Player supports a number of useful features: 5-band equalizer with bass boost and virtualizer, gapless playback, crossfade, metadata editing, automatic album art downloads, and more.

This music player app is no gimmick. It’s highly functional and definitely worth giving a try.

Download: Impulse Music Player (Free)

7. Shuttle Player

Intuitive and lightweight. That’s what separates Shuttle Player from most other music players. It feels smooth and it runs well on older devices, and while there isn’t anything distinctive about the interface, it’s easy enough to use.

Free features include a 6-band equalizer with bass boost, gapless playback, several theme options, a sleep timer, and a few customizable widgets.

Shuttle+ costs $3 and grants a few extra features: built-in tag editor, folder browsing, Chromecast support, and a few more themes.

Download: Shuttle Player (Free)

8. BlackPlayer

BlackPlayer is the best free music player I’ve ever used. It’s clean, it’s modern, it’s lovely on the eyes, it’s easy to navigate, and it’s packed with features: 5-band equalizer, gapless playback, scrobbling, and sleep timer.

A premium version does exist, called BlackPlayer EX, which has extra themes, fonts, more settings to tweak, more ways to customize your experience, a visualizer, better sorting, and a first taste of all future features. For just $3, it’s well worth it.

Download: BlackPlayer (Free)

9. DoubleTwist

DoubleTwist has been around for a while (we first reviewed it way back in 2012), and after all this time, it feels a bit outdated in terms of what it offers.

As a music player, it gets the job done—at least there aren’t any ads, even in the free version—and the interface is quite nice too, but there’s nothing too special about it anymore. It’s still good! It’s just not great anymore.

DoubleTwist Pro is available for $8, which grants AirSync (syncing your music to your PC over Wi-Fi), AirPlay (streaming to devices like Apple TV or Sonos), and a 10-band equalizer.

Download: DoubleTwist (Free)

10. PlayerPro

Again, PlayerPro has all of the standard premium music player features, so choosing it comes down to its interface. While most non-Material apps are ugly, PlayerPro’s unique design is both attractive and satisfying to use.

Special convenience features include importing music history and ratings from desktop music players, custom smart playlists, voice search and Google Now integration, and free complementary plugins.

Download: PlayerPro (Free)

11. Pulsar

If you’re using an older device with outdated hardware, a lot of modern apps may frustrate you with lag and choppiness. Well, Pulsar strikes the perfect balance between a gorgeous appearance and lightweight performance.

It comes at a price—a lack of big advanced features—but that doesn’t mean Pulsar is barebones. You still get smart playlists, fast search, gapless playback, and a built-in tag editor that works quite well. For the 5-band equalizer, bass booster, and reverb features, you’ll need to upgrade to Pulsar Pro for $3.

Download: Pulsar (Free)

The Best Paid Offline Music Player Apps for Android

For us, the difference between a “free” and “paid” app is whether the free version can be used indefinitely. While some of the above apps do have paid versions with extra features, the following apps only offer limited free trials.

12. n7player

n7player has a beautifully sleek interface, and at this price point where all competing apps pretty much have the same feature set, the interface could be the one deciding factor. And for that, n7player makes a solid case.

The 10-band equalizer, volume normalization, gapless playback—these things are all great, but n7player’s real selling point is its nuanced approach to organizing your library. Nothing is ever more than a few taps away.

Download: n7player ($3.49)

13. Neutron Player

Despite its outdated appearance, Neutron Player is one of the best music players out there—indeed, if you’re an audiophile, you’ll immediately recognize that the audio from this app is of utmost quality. It’s professional, one might say.

And that’s what distinguishes Neutron Player: it’s truly the music player for audiophiles. You’ll need to connect your device to a proper set of speakers to hear the difference, of course. It also comes with all the standard premium features you’d expect.

Download: Neutron Player ($6.99)

14. Poweramp

Poweramp is the only app on this list with over 1 million reviews, and that alone should speak volumes. The free trial lasts for 15 days, after which you’ll need to upgrade—and with a price tag of $4, it’s a pretty darn good value.

Poweramp has everything you’d need in an advanced music player: 10-band equalizer, gapless playback, crossfade, replay gain, a built-in tag editor, fast library scan, along with some other niceties like dynamic queues.

It’s the Honda of music players: it may not be luxurious, but it’s reliable.

Download: Poweramp ($3.99)

15. GoneMAD Player

GoneMAD Player is the perfect music app if you love tinkering and customizing every little detail to your heart’s content. Seriously, it has a built-in theme builder and over 250 options that you can tweak. Or choose from over 1,000 preset themes.

Other notable features, on top of the standard premium ones, include an optimized media library that supports 50,000+ songs, two shuffle modes, custom actions on queue completion, custom gestures, and multi-window support on some devices.

Download: GoneMAD Player ($3.99)

Which Android Music Player App Do You Like Best?

Not everyone wants to Spotify their music collection. Streaming music can be convenient, but it’s more reliable and doesn’t use as much data if you download music instead.

AIMP and Pixel Player are my music apps of choice, but you honestly can’t go wrong with any of the ones on this list. And don’t hesitate to shell out a few dollars to get the premium version of an app if you really like it!

By the way, even though most of these music apps have built-in equalizers, the one you choose may not. In that case, you can fall back on one of these sound-boosting equalizer apps for Android.

Read the full article: The 15 Best Offline Music Player Apps for Android

Tweak and Improve Your Phone With These 7 Useful Android Apps

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Android is a fantastic operating system, but that doesn’t mean you can’t improve it. Thankfully, its open nature means skilled developers can make apps that bring changes for the better. Curious? Here are seven Android apps that make small but powerful tweaks. None of the apps need root access. 1. Parallel Space Have you ever wished you could run two instances of the same app at the same time on your Android device? Just think of the possibilities—you could run two versions of WhatsApp, each with a different phone number. Or two versions of Uber; you’d receive double the number…

Read the full article: Tweak and Improve Your Phone With These 7 Useful Android Apps

Android is a fantastic operating system, but that doesn’t mean you can’t improve it.

Thankfully, its open nature means skilled developers can make apps that bring changes for the better. Curious? Here are seven Android apps that make small but powerful tweaks. None of the apps need root access.

1. Parallel Space

Have you ever wished you could run two instances of the same app at the same time on your Android device?

Just think of the possibilities—you could run two versions of WhatsApp, each with a different phone number. Or two versions of Uber; you’d receive double the number of promotions and discounts!

Parallel Space makes it possible. The two versions of the app will run at the same time but are sandboxed from each other, so you won’t encounter forced logouts. The app also offers an incognito installation feature that lets you hide apps from your drawer; other people won’t know you’re running them.

For more information, check out our short instructions on how to set up Parallel Space.

Download: Parallel Space (Free)

2. Status

The Android status bar feels like a forgotten place. When the rest of the Android operating system upgraded to Material Design back in 2014, the status bar was largely untouched. In the intervening years, there have been some minor usability adjustments, but it’s still quite plain.

Status changes all that. You can tweak the status bar’s color, add transparency, change the icons, use animations, adjust the design of notifications, and a whole lot more.

Because the app draws an overlay over the native status bar, all the buttons and gestures will still work. Be warned, however; due to the nature of the app, it requires a lot of permissions. Privacy-conscious users might find it off-putting.

Download: Status (Free)

3. PowerLine

Let’s stick with the theme of status bars for a moment.

Do you ever get annoyed by how difficult it is to see how much battery you have remaining? The icon is so small it’s hard to tell with any precision. And what about your signal strength, CPU usage, Wi-Fi signal, storage capacity, and more? Wouldn’t it be great if you could easily see a detailed breakdown of stats in these areas?

That’s exactly what PowerLine offers. You can add smart indicators to your status bar so you can see them all the time. It also lets you add always-visible indicators anywhere else on your screen.

The free version of the app lets you add two indicators. You’ll need to buy the pro version of the app to add more.

Download: PowerLine (Free) | PowerLine Pro ($3)

4. ACR

ACR (Another Call Recorder) is a call recording app for Android. There’s no native way to record phone calls on your device, so the functionality this app provides is an essential addition to your repertoire.

But why is it useful? Well, you never know when you might need to record a call. Perhaps you’re planning to have a long chat with your lawyer or financial advisor and want to refer back to what you discussed after the event. Or maybe you work in business whereby it’s a legal requirement to record customer calls.

Feature include starred recordings, automatic deletion of old calls, and password protection. For the full benefit, you need to buy the pro version. It lets you automatically record calls to/from specific numbers, create cloud-based backups, and adds a button to start recording manually in the middle of a call.

Download: ACR (Free) | ACR Pro ($4)

5. EasyJoin

Wirelessly moving content between your Android device and your computer has never been straightforward. This is because there’s no native method on the operating system.

Yes, you can use apps like Pushbullet, but they require an internet connection and connect to an external server.

For a more secure method, check out EasyJoin. Instead of using the web, the app relies on your local Wi-Fi network. You can send messages, links, files, folders, and notifications between devices using the clipboard.

By using the ad-free EasyJoin, you’ll save on your data allowance while simultaneously preventing your information from getting into the hands of third-party advertisers.

Download: EasyJoin (Free)

6. Fliktu

The Android share menu is another of the OS’s most underwhelming areas. It works fine, but the lack of customization is frustrating, especially if you always have to scroll a long way to get to the app you want to share with.

There are a few apps that let you clean up the share menu on Android. But some (like CustomShare) require root access, while the once-popular Andmade Share no longer exists.

As such, the best recommendation we can offer is Fliktu. The app has not been updated for a couple of years, but it still works well. You can add manually choose which apps appear on the share menu, pin your most-used apps, and automatically sort your other apps by frequency of usage.

Fliktu used to cost $1, but it’s now free.

Download: Fliktu (Free)

7. Dactyl

How many times have you ruined the perfect photograph because your hand moved slightly while reaching for the shutter button, or your phone jiggled when you pressed the volume down button?

There are probably too many instances to remember. Well, step forward, Dactyl.

Dactyl lets you take photos using your phone’s fingerprint sensor. And best of all, it’s compatible with every camera app—even third-party ones.

When the camera app opens, you won’t need to perform that balance-the-phone-and-press-a-button-and-keep-your-hand-steady dance that you’re so accustomed to. Just put your finger on the sensor, and the shutter will fire.

Download: Dactyl ($2)

Other Apps That Tweak the Android OS

Of course, we’ve covered many other apps that make essential alterations to your Android phone—either by introducing new functionality or fixing a long-standing irritant.

If you’d like to learn more about apps that’ll make your phone more enjoyable to use, check out how to replace many kinds of Android apps with one Google app and the best Android tweaks that don’t require rooting.

Read the full article: Tweak and Improve Your Phone With These 7 Useful Android Apps

How to Mirror Your Android Screen to a PC or Mac Without Root

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Sometimes, you might want to see your Android phone’s screen on your PC. How do you do that? If you have rooted your Android device, it’s easy. But if you haven’t rooted, there are still some simple ways to get your phone or tablet’s screen to show on your PC or Mac. Why Mirror Android to Your PC? Why would you mirror your screen? There are plenty of reasons. You might be a developer in the middle of coding and want to check your app without having to constantly reach for your phone. You might want to share your pictures…

Read the full article: How to Mirror Your Android Screen to a PC or Mac Without Root

android-mirror-pc-mac

Sometimes, you might want to see your Android phone’s screen on your PC. How do you do that?

If you have rooted your Android device, it’s easy. But if you haven’t rooted, there are still some simple ways to get your phone or tablet’s screen to show on your PC or Mac.

Why Mirror Android to Your PC?

Why would you mirror your screen? There are plenty of reasons. You might be a developer in the middle of coding and want to check your app without having to constantly reach for your phone. You might want to share your pictures on a big screen without uploading them. Or you might need to give a presentation quickly while the projector is connected to a PC.

The quickest and easiest way, as you will find out, requires no installation on your phone, and a simple app for your computer.

What You’ll Need

Vysor, made by prolific Android developer Koushik Dutta, is the simplest way to get your Android screen onto your PC or Mac’s screen. Here’s what you need to get started:

  1. Download Vysor for Windows | macOS | Linux | Google Chrome (Free)
  2. A USB cable to connect your phone to your PC.
  3. An Android smartphone or tablet with USB debugging enabled.

As always, if your phone or PC has a USB-C port, then we recommend using a trusted USB-C cable that won’t destroy your devices.

Enable USB Debugging Mode on Android

enable usb debugging on android

We have a full explanation of what USB debugging mode is, but you don’t need to concern yourself with that here. All you need to know is how to enable it:

  1. Go to Settings > About phone (Settings > System > About phone on Android 8 Oreo and newer).
  2. Scroll down and tap Build Number seven times.
  3. Go back to Settings (Settings > System on Oreo and later) and enter the new Developer Options menu.
  4. Scroll down and enable USB debugging.
  5. Confirm the action when prompted.

Share Your Screen to Your PC or Mac via USB

Mirror android phone screen to PC with vysor

Now that you have USB debugging mode activated, the rest is simple.

  1. Start Vysor by searching for it on your computer (or via the Chrome App Launcher if you installed there).
  2. Click Find Devices and select your phone.
  3. Vysor will start up, and you’ll see your Android screen on your computer.
  4. Optional: You can set your phone to connect automatically every time you plug in the USB cable.

With this, you are ready to go. Your mouse and keyboard work within Vysor, so you can start any app you want and type in it too. There are plenty of apps that don’t have a web client, so this is a good way of using your physical keyboard for your phone’s apps.

Vysor’s Appeal Lies in Four Aspects

  1. You don’t need anything installed on your Android phone.
  2. It works on Windows, Mac, and Linux.
  3. The USB cable makes your screen reflect in almost real-time, as opposed to wireless solutions where there is distinct lag.
  4. You can interact with your phone’s screen through your computer.

Try it out and see how you like it. If it’s useful to you, you can pay ($2.50/month or $10/year) for Vysor Pro, which enables high-quality mirroring, wireless mirroring, and drag-and-drop file sharing.

How to Share Your Screen Wirelessly

If your phone runs on Android 5 Lollipop or later, Google has made it easier to mirror the screen of any device. For a wireless, cross-platform solution, Koushik Dutta has another app.

How to set up Android Mirroring with AllCast:

  1. Download: AllCast Receiver for Chrome (Free)
  2. Download: Screen Recording and Mirror for Android (Free)
  3. Make sure your computer and smartphone are on the same Wi-Fi network.
  4. Start AllCast Receiver through the Chrome App Launcher.
  5. Start Screen Recording and Mirror on your Android phone.
  6. In Screen Recording and Mirror, choose the Network Device that matches your PC. It will still start with Chrome @ followed by an IP address.

Just like that, your screen will be wirelessly mirrored on your computer. This is the easiest way to share your Android screen without the hassle of a cable, and it supports other devices on the same network too, including Fire TV, Apple TV, Roku, and more.

This method has a few disadvantages:

  1. You cannot interact with your screen through your PC. The interaction is limited to your phone itself, but you will see what’s happening on the big screen. Unfortunately, that means no typing with your computer’s keyboard on your phone.
  2. Unfortunately, there’s no way to remove annoying Mirror floating watermark. This can be a dampener for presentations and slideshows.

Rooted Is Still the Best Option

As Android has grown, it’s added so many features that only power users really need to root. But if screen mirroring is important to you, then I would still recommend you root because it gives you access to the best way to mirror Android to a PC.

The Android management client Airdroid offers a built-in protocol to wirelessly mirror a rooted Android phone to a Windows or macOS computer. It works for non-rooted phones too, but this requires a cable and works much like the aforementioned Vysor.

But with a rooted phone, you only need to be on the same Wi-Fi network to start mirroring immediately, without watermarks. And you can control the phone too, unlike the AllCast option above.

Don’t forget about the other ways to cast your screen, too.

Read the full article: How to Mirror Your Android Screen to a PC or Mac Without Root

The 13 Best Xposed Modules for Customizing Your Android Device

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The Xposed Framework is the most important tool for modding and tweaking Android. Xposed uses modules, small apps that plug directly into the operating system and give you total control over the look and feel of your phone. It’s so powerful, yet all the changes can be undone simply by deactivating or uninstalling the modules. The system works on most rooted phones and you can download the Xposed Installer from XDA Developers. In this guide we’ll take a look at the best Xposed modules, focusing on ones that have near-universal compatibility. How to Install Xposed Modules Most Xposed modules should…

Read the full article: The 13 Best Xposed Modules for Customizing Your Android Device

xposed-modules-marshmallow

The Xposed Framework is the most important tool for modding and tweaking Android.

Xposed uses modules, small apps that plug directly into the operating system and give you total control over the look and feel of your phone. It’s so powerful, yet all the changes can be undone simply by deactivating or uninstalling the modules.

The system works on most rooted phones and you can download the Xposed Installer from XDA Developers.

In this guide we’ll take a look at the best Xposed modules, focusing on ones that have near-universal compatibility.

How to Install Xposed Modules

Most Xposed modules should be installed directly from within the Xposed Framework app.

  1. Go to Downloads.
  2. Select the module you want.
  3. Swipe across to the Versions tab and hit Download.
  4. Click Install when prompted.
  5. Go to Modules and tick the box next to the box to activate it.
  6. Reboot your phone.

In a few cases, it’s recommended you download a version from the Play Store instead. We’ve linked to those where applicable. Remember to activate it, then reboot your phone to complete the installation.

1. Amplify Battery Extender

If you want to stretch your battery as far as it can go, look no further than Amplify. It’s perhaps best seen as a companion to the other top performance-boosting app, Greenify (which also has some Xposed functionality).

While Greenify focuses on apps running in the background, Amplify takes care of wakelocks. These occur when an app prevents your phone from entering deep sleep, sometimes for legitimate reasons, and sometimes because it is running amok.

If you’ve ever gone to bed with a fully charged phone and woken up to discover the battery has lost 40 percent overnight, it’s highly likely that wakelocks were the culprit. Amplify helps prevent that from happening.

Download: Amplify Battery Extender (Free)

2. GravityBox

GravityBox has always been among the biggest reasons to use Xposed. It’s an unbelievably comprehensive tool for modding and enhancing the Android user interface. This utility allows you to tweak and improve almost every part of the Android experience.

From adding an app launcher to the navigation bar, to customising LED notifications, to switching to an experimental left-handed mode, some of the enhancements are huge.

But it’s often the smaller tweaks that give the most satisfaction, like being able to press the volume buttons to skip tracks in your music player, or resizing any widget in your stock launcher.

3. XPrivacyLua

XPrivacyLua is a permissions manager that enables you to control which functions and data apps can actually access on your device. It’s a new and updated version of one of the most popular Xposed modules, XPrivacy.

With the introduction of granular permissions controls in recent versions of Android, XPrivacyLua may seem less useful than it once was. Yet every app automatically gets the internet access permission, whether they need it or not. This is normally for benign purposes, like gathering analytics data or delivering ads, but it could be a potential security issue too.

With XPrivacyLua, you can ensure that only those apps you want going online are allowed to do so.

4. Awesome Pop-Up Video

awseome pop-up video youtube

Awesome Pop-Up Video lives up to its name. It’s a fantastic app for multitaskers and procrastinators alike, as it enables you to watch a video in a little popup window while you’re working in another app.

The app has its own gallery of suggested videos, but it works in other players too, including the official YouTube app. Simply open your video, hit the Share button, choose Awesome Pop-up Video from the list, and you’re all set.

Download: Awesome Pop-Up Video (Free)

5. No Lock Home

Android has a few Smart Lock features that keep your phone unlocked under certain conditions, such as your location or proximity to a paired Bluetooth device.

One that’s absent is the ability to keep the phone unlocked when it’s connected to a particular Wi-Fi network. No Lock Home adds that feature, so you can set up a far larger number of secure locations where your phone does not need to stay locked.

6. ChromePie

ChromePie makes the Chrome browser more useable with one hand on big-screen phones. It borrows the “pie control” concept seen in numerous custom ROMs.

Hold your thumb on a specific area of the screen, such as a corner or one of the edges, and the pie controls appear as a semi-circle panel of icons. This module integrates with Chrome, and puts tab switching, bookmarks, and more within easy reach of your thumb.

7. BootManager

A lot of apps take liberties with your system resources, setting themselves to load whenever you boot your device. It can lengthen the startup time and waste power until Android decides to close them down itself.

You can nix that with BootManager. Just choose the apps you don’t want automatically launching and then reboot your phone. It’s like a more intelligent version of a task killer (which you should never use), and it can keep your less-used apps quiet until you actually need them.

8. NeverSleep

neversleep keep apps awake

Most of the time, you want your phone to sleep in order to save power. But sometimes that can be a real pain. Maybe you’re following a recipe, or just waiting for a long GIF to load in your favorite Reddit app. You don’t want the screen turning off in these cases.

The simple solution is the NeverSleep mod. All it does it present you with a list of every app on your phone. Choose the ones you want, and your phone will stay awake whenever they are running in the foreground.

9. XInsta

If you’re an Instagram user, there’s no doubt you’ll have come across content that you’d like to save locally. This could be a beautiful image to set as your phone wallpaper, or a GIF-worthy video.

While there are a few tools to help you download Instagram videos and photos, none are quite as easy as XInsta. Just install and activate the module, and the next time you open Instagram, you’ll see a download option under the three-dot menu button for each image.

There are a few other options too, including downloading stories and quickly seeing if a particular user follows you.

10. Settings Editor

The ability to tweak and configure Android is one of its greatest strengths. But there are so many options that lots of Android’s most useful settings are hidden.

A quick fix for this is to use the Settings Editor module to tidy up your phone’s Settings screens. You can change how they look, making them bigger or smaller or changing colors to make them more readable.

Better still, you can remove entire categories from the Settings screen, as well as individual options from within any category. By streamlining the settings, you’ll be able to find the ones you need more easily.

11. XposedNavigationBar

The XposedNavigationBar modules offers a number of ways to tweak Android’s navbar. This is the area at the bottom of the screen that contains the Back, Home, and Recent buttons.

Its best feature is to let you add an extra shortcut to the bar. This is small dot that you can tap to access a function you use often. You can set it to launch a specific app, open the notifications pane, show music controls, and much more.

12. Exi for SwiftKey

SwiftKey is one of the most popular third-party keyboards, making it one of the best ways to type faster on your Android phone.

Exi for SwiftKey makes it even better. This mod brings a number of features you might know from other keyboards, like swiping left and right to move the cursor as in Gboard.

It also adds traits from physical keyboards, like using Ctrl + C and Ctrl + V to copy and paste. And it introduces shortcuts, wherein you can enter longer words or phrases by just typing a few characters.

13. Xposed Edge

Android P is introducing basic gesture controls. But they’ve got nothing on Xposed Edge.

Xposed Edge is designed to make navigating a large-screened phone with one hand much easier. You can use a pie controller—similar to what we saw in ChromePie—across the entire interface. The app can also assign new functions to your phone’s physical buttons.

And you can create gestures to perform common tasks. These are tied to specific regions around the edge of your screen. The bottom-right area, for instance, is the perfect place for a Back gesture—just swipe your thumb right to left to return to the previous screen.

Download: Xposed Edge (Free)

Even More Modules for Your Android Phone

Xposed is a goldmine of hacks and mods, and is one of the best reasons why it’s still worth rooting your phone. Since mods are so simple to install and use, they’re a great option even for those who are less confident at tweaking their devices. And modules aren’t limited to Xposed, either.

These days, we recommend Magisk as the best way to root an Android device. It’s a systemless method that makes no lasting changes to your device, so it can be hidden or undone in an instant. Magisk also supports a heap of modules of its own—including a systemless version of Xposed.

If you can’t get enough of these awesome little hacks, check out our guide to the best Magisk modules for more way to enhance your Android device.

Read the full article: The 13 Best Xposed Modules for Customizing Your Android Device

Solve 10 Big Android Issues and Annoyances With These Apps

solve-big-android-issues

Every few months, a new flagship smartphone launches with a top-of-the-line processor and more RAM that you know what to do with. But still, after some time, flagship phones still start to lag. Indeed, even the highest-end Android smartphone have their annoyances. No matter which Android phone you have, the best way to keep your device functioning properly is by installing user-friendly apps that help you manage your phone’s life in a simple way. These Android apps will solve your biggest annoyances and make your phone more pleasant to use. 1. Nova Launcher This rule is as nearly old as…

Read the full article: Solve 10 Big Android Issues and Annoyances With These Apps

Every few months, a new flagship smartphone launches with a top-of-the-line processor and more RAM that you know what to do with. But still, after some time, flagship phones still start to lag. Indeed, even the highest-end Android smartphone have their annoyances.

No matter which Android phone you have, the best way to keep your device functioning properly is by installing user-friendly apps that help you manage your phone’s life in a simple way.

These Android apps will solve your biggest annoyances and make your phone more pleasant to use.

1. Nova Launcher

This rule is as nearly old as Android itself. If your Android phone came with its own launcher, you should replace it with something better. Right now, that’s Nova Launcher. That’s because Nova adds a ton of new features to your home screen while still keeping everything light.

You can create and customize swipe gestures (different ones for apps, folders, and the wallpaper itself), create quick shortcuts for apps, customize notification badges, and a lot more.

Download: Nova Launcher (Free)
Download: Nova Launcher Prime ($5)

2. GBoard

The same rule with replacing launchers applies to keyboards, too. If you’ve got a manufacturer’s keyboard or something like SwiftKey, you should switch to Gboard before long. Just download the app on the Play Store to get going.

It is the most user-friendly and feature-rich keyboard on Android. The best function is the built-in G button, which allows you to quickly search for anything on Google. It also gives answers to your questions by using Google instant answers.

You’ll also find improved features like quick sharing of search results, gesture mode, swipe gestures, and GIF search.

Download: Gboard (Free)

3. New Pipe

This app takes some of the most-coveted features from YouTube Premium and gives them to you for free. New Pipe lets you listen to YouTube videos in the background, watch videos in Picture-in-Picture mode, and even download a video (or just audio if you feel like it).

While it can’t replace the YouTube app entirely, it can replicate some specific features. You can, for instance, search for videos, play them, and even subscribe to channels.

New Pipe isn’t available on the Play Store, but you can download it using the F-Droid open source app store.

Download: NewPipe (Free)

4. Texpand

Gboard is a great keyboard app, but you know how frustrating it is typing on a smartphone keyboard for long periods of time. If you’re using your Android phone as your primary communication device, you’ll need something to ease your pain.

Texpand text allows you to expand your texts in an easier way. Start by adding frequently used text snippets inside the app (like your address or a template email) and assign a shortcut for the snippet. Next time you type that shortcut, it will show a little dropdown menu. Tap on your snippet to automatically paste it in!

Texpand also gives you features to customize your phrases with additional input types and you can organize phrases in a multi-level folder structure.

Download: Texpand (Free)
Download: Texpand Plus ($3)

5. Timbre

Timbre is a free and effective app that allows you to edit audio and video files directly on your Android phone. No need to switch to your computer for small edits!

This app is efficient in merging, cutting, and trimming media which is often all we require. The app has a clean interface; it neatly divides audio and video editing tools into two different sections. But mostly you’ll just need to play around in these five tools: join, cut, convert, omit, and split.

Download: Timbre (Free, premium version available)

6. Clip Stack

Here’s an app that solves the biggest annoyance you didn’t know you had: managing your clipboard. Once you install Clip Stack, it remembers everything you copy to your clipboard. This little feature frees up your mind so that you aren’t constantly worrying about whether you saved that number you copied from the web this morning.

Clip Stack saves all the copied texts in its database. And they stay there no matter what—even after you’ve rebooted your device.

Download: Clip Stack (Free)

7. Datally

Datally is Google’s own solution to your data consumption woes. Due to limited mobile data plans, it’s easy to run through a month’s limit by watching a couple of movies on Netflix. Thankfully, Datally fixes this annoyance.

The app tracks your data consumption intelligently, taking a two-pronged approach. It tells you which app is using how much data (and in which context) and gives you tools to manage data consumption for that app. You even get to see your data usage on an hourly basis.

Once you’ve figured out which apps are using too much data, you can set a daily limit or limits for a specific app.

Download: Datally (Free)

8. QuickPic

Once Google Photos took the center stage, Android said goodbye to the trusty old Gallery app. Google Photos is great for syncing photos, intelligent recommendations, photo sharing, and search. But it’s not a good gallery replacement. If you’re frustrated by Google Photos, we recommend you try QuickPic.

QuickPic has a simple interface with no frills. It’s a classic gallery app that makes it easy to view, manage, and share your photos. It displays your photo folders as grid icons or as a list, while the top-right corner opens the camera.

It allows you to choose a folder, then you’re directed to the photo browser with an option to go back or switch to a multi-selection mode. The app also has options like rename, share, delete, and zoom.

Download: QuickPic (Free)

9. Files Go

Files Go helps you free up space, find files quickly, and share files with people nearby. It’s similar to AirDrop on iOS.

The app also has smart storage management tools. It gives you recommendations for which files to delete (such as unused apps or low-resolution videos). By simply installing Files Go and running a cleanup, you can save around 1GB of storage space. Your old Android phone will be thankful!

Download: Files Go (Free)

10. Sesame

Android’s built-in search feature is great at searching for content on the web, but not so much when it comes to searching on your device. If you’re looking for a file, a song, or a contact, those search results usually come in at the bottom of the search page—if they show up at all.

The only reliable way to solve this problem on Android is to use Sesame for Nova Launcher. The app has a free trial and you can unlock the app by paying $3.

Sesame brings deep linking and amazingly accurate on-device search to your fingertips. Once you’ve enabled the plugin for Nova, just start typing and you’ll be able to jump directly to a specific WhatsApp conversation or look for a file you downloaded as an email attachment in seconds.

Download: Sesame (Free, premium version available)

Mastering Android With Apps and More

These apps remove some of the biggest pain points Android users have. Give them a try and see how much more efficient your phone becomes!

If you’ve just got your first Android phone, or if you’ve switched over from an iPhone, some of the basic actions like creating a contact or making a video call might be daunting. In that case, you may want to check out our complete beginner’s guide to Android.

Read the full article: Solve 10 Big Android Issues and Annoyances With These Apps

How to Make Android Faster: What Works and What Doesn’t

custom-rom-android

We all wish our phones were just a little faster. Whether you’re chugging along with a device from three years ago or rocking one of the best new Android phones, it’s the same—more speed is always better. There’s no shortage of ideas on how you can speed up Android device. Unfortunately, not all of them work. The good news is, we’ve tested them all for you. Read on to find out how to make your phone faster—and what you should avoid doing. How to Speed Up Android: Basic Tips The default apps and settings on Android aren’t always the best…

Read the full article: How to Make Android Faster: What Works and What Doesn’t

custom-rom-android

We all wish our phones were just a little faster. Whether you’re chugging along with a device from three years ago or rocking one of the best new Android phones, it’s the same—more speed is always better.

There’s no shortage of ideas on how you can speed up Android device. Unfortunately, not all of them work.

The good news is, we’ve tested them all for you. Read on to find out how to make your phone faster—and what you should avoid doing.

How to Speed Up Android: Basic Tips

The default apps and settings on Android aren’t always the best if speed is your priority. Making a few changes and keeping your phone free from clutter can speed up your phone’s performance.

1. Clean Up Your Home Screen

If your phone has a slower processor or is light on RAM, then maintaining a lean home screen can help speed it up. Live wallpapers and widgets use resources, and the latter can even continue updating in the background.

Where you’re most likely to see their impact is through something called “home screen redraw.” When you switch away from a RAM-heavy app like Chrome, you’ll see a completely blank home screen and have to wait a couple of seconds while your icons, widgets, and wallpaper all reload. Keep your home screens tidy to avoid this.

2. Use a Different Launcher

The default launcher on your phone is usually designed to showcase your device’s best features. As a result, it isn’t always the fastest or most efficient.

You’ll find a huge number of third-party launchers in the Play Store, and many are optimized for speed. Our favorite is Nova Launcher, but it’s worth experimenting with a few to find the one that’s right for you.

3. Change Browsers

Android Data Savings Browser

The default web browser on Android is Chrome, and it’s a pretty resource-heavy app. There are a few ways you can improve it, but a better solution is switching to an entirely different browser.

Some benchmark tests have shown Puffin as the fastest Android browser. If you prefer something more similar to Chrome, then take a look at Opera. Its data compression feature can help pages load much more quickly.

4. Uninstall Bad Apps

Bad apps are often to blame for slowing down your phone. It’s not always obscure apps, either—some of the biggest names are common culprits.

Snapchat is notoriously laggy on Android, while uninstalling Facebook could make your phone as much as 15% faster. Try switching to a third-party Facebook app instead. There are also lightweight versions of the main Google apps that use less memory and run faster.

5. Remove Antivirus Software

Antivirus software claims to offer peace of mind to Android users, but it’s unnecessary. It slows down your phone and drains your battery. As long as you only install apps from official sources like the Play Store or Amazon Appstore, you’re extremely unlikely to encounter malware.

6. Stop Apps Auto-Syncing

Social, news, weather, and many other classes of apps are set to automatically sync. By default, they go online as often as every 15 minutes. With too many of these apps installed, your phone will soon creak under their weight.

Check the sync schedules for all your apps and set a longer schedule of every few hours or once a day. Or just turn off syncing and update them manually instead.

7. Check for and Install Updates

Each new version of Android offers performance improvements over the last, so if your phone has updates available then you should always install them. Of course, not all manufacturers update their phones, so this is something to consider next time you’re upgrading.

The same goes for apps. Turn on automatic updates in the Play Store to ensure that you receive the latest updates as soon as an app’s resource-hogging, battery-draining bugs get fixed. Go to Settings > Auto-update apps to set it up.

8. Reboot Regularly

Android Reboot

Finally, the best way to tune up Android is to reboot it regularly. This helps to keep the OS running smoothly.

You don’t have to do it every day, but an occasional reboot will work wonders, especially if your phone gets particularly slow or starts running hotter than normal.

If you try all these tips and find that nothing works, a factory reset may be in order—just make sure you back up your Android data first!

How to Speed Up Android: Advanced Tips

Want something a bit more advanced? If you like delving into hidden settings, or if your device is rooted, then you have even more opportunities to speed up Android.

9. Speed Up Animations

Android is packed with animations and transitions that give the operating system a slick look and make it fun to use. A hidden setting enables you to control the speed of these animations. In turn, this improves the speed (or at least the perceived speed) of your phone.

Go to Settings > Developer options (Settings > System > Developer options on Android Oreo and later) and set Window animation scale, Transition animation scale, and Animator duration scale to .5x. This cuts the length of the animations by half (you can turn them off entirely if you want, but this looks jarring).

If you can’t see Developer options, you’ll need to enable it first. Go to Settings > About phone (Settings > System > About phone on Android Oreo and newer) and tap Build number seven times to make the option appear.

10. Try a Different ROM

LineageOS Android

A custom ROM contains a complete build of the Android operating system, and replaces all the software that came pre-installed on your phone. ROMs may have a different look or extra features, or can be optimized for performance.

Installing a custom ROM is a good idea if the stock software on your phone isn’t great. Many manufacturers pack their devices with extra apps and features that make them bloated, buggy, and slow. Replacing it with a bloat-free ROM like LineageOS can give you an instant speed boost.

11. Flash a Custom Kernel

The kernel manages every interaction between your phone’s software and hardware. Custom kernels enable you to tweak how the hardware functions. You can change how quickly the processor ramps up to top speed, or how busy it needs to be before it activates extra cores.

Some even offer per-app settings so you can have the device running on maximum power when playing a particular game, and drop back to normal as soon as you exit it.

12. Control Background Apps With Greenify

Task killers don’t speed up your phone, as we’ll see shortly. The app Greenify sounds like a task killer—it prevents apps from running in the background—but there’s a subtle difference.

Greenify runs at the system level to not only close apps, but also prevent them from running at all until you need them. This means it also has the effect of stopping apps from auto-syncing, as well as preventing them from loading when you boot your phone.

It’s less useful on Android Oreo and later, due to improvements in how those operating systems manage resources. But on older devices, Greenfiy is one of the best reasons to root.

How to Speed Up Android: What Doesn’t Work

As well as the tips that do work, there are a few common speed-boosting techniques that don’t. Be wary of any app that makes grand claims about how much it can speed up your phone.

1. Task Killers

Task killers are among the most popular utilities on the Play Store, yet they are completely worthless. In fact, they can make your phone slower.

A task killer closes background apps to free up RAM. It works on the idea that free RAM improves performance, but this isn’t true. Android is designed to keep apps in RAM so it can restore them quickly—it will intelligently close apps whenever it needs to free up extra resources.

More importantly, certain app processes will start up again as soon as they are killed because they need to run in the background. This constant stopping and starting will slow your phone down far more than if you just let Android do its job.

2. Closing Apps

For the same reason, there’s no need to worry about manually closing apps. Again, Android manages this automatically. If Android needs to free up resources, it will close whichever apps you haven’t used in a while.

If not, leave them alone. Keeping them in memory will have little to no effect on either performance or battery life. Better yet, it helps make your apps load faster next time you need them.

3. Using Speed Boosters or Defragmenters

While we try to avoid generalizations, it’s safe to say you should avoid any non-root app that promises to improve the performance of your phone. This includes RAM boosters, SD card speeder-uppers, and anything else along those lines that you can find on the Play Store.

They rarely work, are often packed with highly intrusive ads, and can actually slow your phone down.

Also, do not use defragmenter apps for Android. Your phone doesn’t need defragmenting—it uses flash memory and is not affected by fragmentation. All the phone defraggers on Google Play will not make your phone run faster. At best, they’ll have no effect; at worst, they may be scam apps.

The Ultimate Way to Speed Up Android

Of course, there’s only so far you can go to speed up your phone. You can keep it clean and running smoothly for a while, but sooner or later you’ll hit the limits of the hardware. Then you reach the ultimate speed tip: upgrade to a new device.

Read the full article: How to Make Android Faster: What Works and What Doesn’t

The 7 Best Volume Booster Apps for Your Android Phone

android-volume-booster

Android is great for watching movies and TV, and listening to music and podcasts. But there’s one problem—a lot of Android phones aren’t loud enough. So what can you do? In this quick guide, we’ll show you the best volume booster apps and other tools to increase the volume on your Android device. Android Volume Booster Apps: Beware! If you want to find the best volume booster app for Android, the obvious place to start is a search on the Play Store. This turns up dozens of results, consisting of apps with the same name, great ratings, and huge numbers…

Read the full article: The 7 Best Volume Booster Apps for Your Android Phone

android-volume-booster

Android is great for watching movies and TV, and listening to music and podcasts. But there’s one problem—a lot of Android phones aren’t loud enough.

So what can you do? In this quick guide, we’ll show you the best volume booster apps and other tools to increase the volume on your Android device.

Android Volume Booster Apps: Beware!

If you want to find the best volume booster app for Android, the obvious place to start is a search on the Play Store. This turns up dozens of results, consisting of apps with the same name, great ratings, and huge numbers of downloads.

But here’s the problem: we struggled to get them to work.

Play Store Android Volume Booster Apps

Your mileage may vary, of course. Perhaps specific apps do work on certain devices. But we’d be reluctant to recommend them, anyway.

“Volume boosters” seems to be a category that attracts a lot of spammy or junk apps. All the free ones we tested were overloaded with intrusive ads.

Some had ads that appeared after every tap on the interface. Others had ads that would pop up on top of other apps we used. A couple even played full-screen videos ads with sound. That’s the last thing you want when you’ve got the volume cranked up to the max.

Let’s focus on the apps that do actually work.

1. Equalizer

Equalizers are generally the best option for improving sound quality. They make your phone louder, and you can use the frequency sliders to tame any distortion that may appear as a side effect. The simply named Equalizer is as good and simple to use as you’ll find.

With Equalizer you can choose from 11 preset sound profiles. If you upgrade to the paid version, you can create your own, too. Hit the Power button in the top-right corner to activate the Sound Amplifier. You can also use the Bass Boost here—it’s great if you’ve got quality headphones, though it may reveal the limitations of your phone’s speakers.

Download: Equalizer (Free, premium version available)

2. Equalizer FX

This app covers similar ground to Equalizer with one significant difference: it works with Google Play Music. Many third-party audio apps don’t work with streaming services, or at least only do so as a paid extra. There’s no such problem with FX; it works automatically as standard, and for free.

The Effects tab has the Bass Boost and Loudness Enhancer options that will help improve the volume of your phone’s speakers.

Download: Equalizer FX (Free)

3. Precise Volume

Precise Volume is a comprehensive volume app that offers something for everyone. There’s an equalizer with a sound amplifier function. You also get presets that will activate when you insert a set of headphones, and you can set custom volume levels for different apps.

Our favorite feature is the app’s namesake. It replaces Android’s standard 15-step volume control with a 100-step alternative. It gives the finest control over exactly how loud you want your phone to be.

Download: Precise Volume (Free, premium version available)

4. VLC for Android

If your low volume woes are limited to music and movies, then installing VLC is a quick solution.

The popular media player lets you boost the sound by as much as 200 percent, albeit it’s a little tricky to find. First, you may need to go to Preferences > Video > Audio-boost to enable the volume increase.

Now, when you start playing your media, hit the Settings button and select the Equalizer icon. You’ll be prompted to save a new Equalizer preset, although you don’t have to do this.

In the next dialog box, find the horizontal slider at the top and drag it to the right to increase the sound level. When you exit, you have the option to save your changes again.

Unlike on the desktop, VLC on Android is great for music as much as it is movies. If you store a lot of content locally on your device, this could be a good solution for you.

Download: VLC for Android (Free)

5. MX Player

MX Player Android

For videos only, MX Player is also able to increase the sound of your movies by 200 percent beyond the level your phone normally allows. This one’s easy to use, thanks to the app’s gesture-based controls, although you need to set it up first.

Go to Settings > Audio and check the box labeled Volume boost. Next, go to Settings > Decoder and select the box HW+ decoder (local).

Now start playing a video. Swipe up the screen to increase the volume. A setting of 15 takes you to your phone’s maximum volume level. Keep swiping and you can increase it by a further 15 points. The volume returns to normal when you exit the app.

Download: MX Player (Free)

6. Podcast Addict

Podcasts can be a particular problem, even on phones that have decent speakers. Many of them aren’t recorded professionally, so they don’t have great sound quality and are often quieter than you’d like.

Lots of the best podcast apps have options that can help. We’re recommending Podcast Addict because it not only has a volume boost setting, it also has a built-in equalizer. This makes it possible to tweak the sound in your favorite podcasts to emphasize the voices while toning down music or audience noise.

That can be more effective than merely making the whole recording louder.

Download: Podcast Addict (Free)

7. Viper4Android

It’s a lot easier to boost the volume if you’ve rooted your Android phone or tablet. It opens you up to using apps like Viper4Android, an awesome (and incredibly powerful) audio tool.

There’s an unofficial version of Viper4Android for non-root devices in the Play Store. But for best results, install it either as a root app, through the Xposed Framework, or as one of the best Magisk Modules.

Once installed, you can activate the eXtra Loud mode, which runs from Slight to Extreme strength levels. You can also use the Speaker Optimization tool to get the best possible sound quality from your phone’s built-in speakers.

Better yet, you don’t have to settle for a one-size-fits-all approach. You can use different settings to boost the volume on headphones or Bluetooth speakers as well.

Download: Viper4Android (Free)

Other Ways to Boost Your Android Volume

If you’re still not happy with how loud your phone’s speakers can get, there are other ways to tweak the volume on Android.

First, make sure you know where the speakers are and keep them clear. Most phone cases have small cutouts for the speakers, which can easily become clogged with dust over time.

A few acoustic tricks can work wonders. Placing your phone in a large glass will amplify the sound. If you don’t have one of these on hand, try placing your phone near a hard surface to deflect it in your direction instead.

Also, if your phone has a speaker along the bottom edge, cup your hand around it to divert the sound toward you.

Finally, remember that smartphone speakers are naturally limited. Almost any external speaker, even a small one, will be better than what’s built-in. Check out our guide to the best cheap Bluetooth speakers to find your perfect match.

Read the full article: The 7 Best Volume Booster Apps for Your Android Phone