Global unicorn exits hit multi-year high in 2018

Unicorn exits are taking flight. With the IPO window wide open, an apparent record number of venture-backed companies privately valued over $1 billion have launched public offerings this year.

Unicorn exits are taking flight.

With the IPO window wide open, an apparent record number of venture-backed companies privately valued over $1 billion have launched public offerings this year. Crunchbase data shows 23 unicorn IPOs globally so far in 2018, well outpacing full-year totals for 2016 and 2017.

Collectively, this year’s newly public unicorns are doing pretty well too. Most priced shares around or above expectations. We’re also seeing a lot of impressive aftermarket gains. At least six are currently valued at more than $10 billion.

Meanwhile, unicorn M&A volumes are chugging along as well, with at least 11 deals so far this year. Big transactions like Walmart’s $16 billion acquisition of Flipkart and Microsoft’s $7.5 billion purchase of GitHub have helped boost the totals.

It all adds up to some enormous numbers. We’ll delve into those in more detail below, focusing on year-over-year comparisons, geographic breakdown, biggest exits and more.

How 2018 compares to prior years

First off, a bit of context. A lot of startup-related metrics are on track to hit multi-year or record highs in 2018. These are lofty times for supergiant funding rounds, venture capital fundraising and unicorn investment, to name a few. Given that pattern, it’s not surprising to see a pickup in unicorn exits too, including some really big names like Xiaomi, Spotify and Dropbox.

That said, if one focuses on anticipated exits, as opposed to the ones that already occurred, even this year’s phenomenal IPO streak may seem comparatively humdrum. There’s mounting excitement around the potential for even bigger offerings next year from UberAirbnb, Didi Chuxing and others.

If markets don’t implode in the next few months, and at least some of these household names make it to market, it’s likely 2019 will be an even bigger year for unicorn IPOs than 2018. Unfortunately, however, we don’t have hard data on the future, so we’re left comparing this year to the prior two in the chart below:

As you can see, we’re already well ahead of last year’s totals. On the IPO front, not only are the 2018 unicorn offerings more numerous, they’re also bigger. In 2017, out of 16 unicorn IPOs, there were two at initial valuations above $10 billion (Snap and online insurer ZhongAn). So far this year, there have been five.

Geography of unicorn exits

The exiting unicorns are also a geographically diverse bunch, with the U.S. and China accounting for the lion’s share and Europe trailing a distant third.

In the chart below, we look at the geographic breakdown in more detail:

While the U.S. produced the largest number of unicorn exits, they weren’t the biggest. Notably, this year’s most valuable IPOs and M&A deal involved companies based in Europe and Asia.

Of the six 2018 debuts currently valued at $10 billion or more, detailed below, only one, Dropbox, is a U.S. company. In the chart below, we look at who topped the rankings:

Adding it up

The grand tally of 2018 exits provides a clear counterpoint to skeptics (your author included), who questioned whether fast-growing unicorn populations and valuations would hold up with acquirers and public market investors.

It appears prices are keeping up nicely. The vast majority of U.S. unicorn exits this year, for instance, were close to or above private market valuations. Among U.S. IPOs the only big fizzle was Domo. While Dropbox looked like a “down round IPO” at first, strong aftermarket performance has the company above its highest reported private valuation.

The year’s largest unicorn IPO — China’s Xiaomi — also managed to slightly top its last reported private valuation, even after pricing shares for its June IPO far below initial projections.

All these giant exits add up. The unicorns that went public this year currently have a collective market capitalization north of $200 billion. Add in roughly $45 billion from M&A deals, and we’re talking close to a quarter of a trillion (!) dollars in post-exit value.

These big exits come as investors continue to funnel record sums into high-valuation private companies. So far this year, investors have poured more than $200 billion into venture and growth-stage startups, with more than $70 billion going into companies already valued at $1 billion or more.

In sum, we’re seeing big numbers all around — going in as investments and coming out as exits. Eventually, all parties wind down. But for now, this one rages on.

12 High-Quality Airbnb Alternatives for Any Budget

With tens of millions of users and countless properties to choose from, Airbnb really is incredible. But as far as vacation rental websites go, it’s not perfect. You might want to look at a few Airbnb alternatives for these reasons: All the properties in your budget might be booked. You may not find what you’re looking for. You might want to avoid Airbnb’s massive service fees. Or you might just want to support the smaller fish. So why not try one of these Airbnb alternatives instead? These range from Airbnb’s direct competitors, to smaller vacation rental sites catering to tiny niches….

Read the full article: 12 High-Quality Airbnb Alternatives for Any Budget

With tens of millions of users and countless properties to choose from, Airbnb really is incredible. But as far as vacation rental websites go, it’s not perfect. You might want to look at a few Airbnb alternatives for these reasons:

  • All the properties in your budget might be booked.
  • You may not find what you’re looking for.
  • You might want to avoid Airbnb’s massive service fees.
  • Or you might just want to support the smaller fish.

So why not try one of these Airbnb alternatives instead? These range from Airbnb’s direct competitors, to smaller vacation rental sites catering to tiny niches. Between these, you’ll definitely find what you’re looking for.

1. VRBO

VRBO Vacation Rentals

Part of the HomeAway family of websites, VRBO (Vacation Rentals by Owner) is a leading Airbnb alternative focusing largely, but not exclusively, on un-hosted rentals. This means you’ll often get the whole place to yourself.

You’re guaranteed to find something of interest on VRBO rentals. After all, they have over 2 million properties in around 200 countries.

2. HomeStay

HomeStay Vacation Rentals

Homestay is essentially what Airbnb was way back when it first started. Instead of offering rooms and dedicated vacation rentals, HomeStay allows you to stay with a local in their own home.

Not only does this offer genuine value for money, but you get to experience an entirely different side to a location that you wouldn’t normally see while making friends in the process.

3. Tripping

Tripping.com vacation rental search

Tripping.com saves you masses of time by displaying results from several Airbnb alternatives at once—but it won’t show results from Airbnb itself. You’re able to scour 12 million vacation rentals (not hotels) on sites like VRBO, Trip Advisor, and Home Away, all from a single search.

When you click on a listing you like, Tripping.com will direct you to the correct site, where you can find more information, read reviews, and make your booking.

4. HomeAway

HomeAway vacation rentals

HomeAway is one of Airbnb’s main direct competitors, offering a huge range of property rentals, from lakeside cabins to quirky studio apartments.

Like Airbnb, many of HomeAway’s properties can be booked instantly, without the need to wait for confirmation from the host. But unlike Airbnb, HomeAway’s service fee ranges from 6 to 12 percent, compared to up to 20 percent from Airbnb. This sometimes translates to slightly lower prices for guests.

5. Kid&Coe

Kid&Coe family friendly vacation rentals

With around 1000 properties, Kid&Coe is scarcely a replacement for Airbnb, but it does deserve a special mention. Each of these beautiful properties has been hand-picked to ensure it’s absolutely perfect for families. There will be books and toys galore, highchairs, cribs, gardens. The works.

Having a selection of child-ready houses in many of the worlds most visited cities will be a godsend to many families, and a shortcut to spending far less time hunting for a kid-friendly vacation rental.

6. 9Flats

9Flats vacation rentals

Although originally set up as a European alternative to Airbnb, 9Flats has grown to offer vacation rentals around the world. Most of 9flats’ listings are actually hosted by the property’s owner, so you can usually gather local knowledge and recommendations directly from your host.

As an added bonus, you also have the option to pay in cash on arrival (provided that option has been activated by the host) after paying a small deposit on the site.

7. Behomm

Behomm luxury home exchange

Although it’s not a direct competitor to Airbnb, Behomm is worth a mention. This is an exclusive global exchange site for creatives who love to travel. “You stay at my home for free while I stay at yours.” If your host is up for it, you can also stay at their home for free while they’re around, too.

There’s a catch, though. To join this community you not only need to be invited, but you also need to have an absolutely stunning house (like these) to exchange. If you are lucky enough to be invited, you get to try out the service for free for the first year. After that, it’s €95 per year. To try to get invited by one of the founders, complete this form.

8. Trip Advisor Vacation Rentals

Trip Advisor Vacation Rentals

On its own, Trip Advisor is the world’s largest travel community (though there are plenty of other travel communities out there alternatives), so it was only a matter of time before the company launched its own site like Airbnb. And with close to one million properties available, you’ve got more than enough choice here.

The aim of Trip Advisor Vacation Rentals is to offer guests an alternative to hotels, where you get the additional space and amenities to feel at home. Plus, Trip Advisor integrates its rentals with the community, so you’ll receive useful information about tours, experiences, and itineraries when you book.

9. Wimdu

Wimdu vacation rentals

With 350,000 vacation properties available, Wimdu is definitely worth checking out. Bear in mind, however, that although the site’s listings are spread over 150 countries, it’s in Europe where the site really stands out, claiming to be “Europe’s biggest portal for city and holiday apartments.”

The site offers different levels of quality checks, so you can have confidence that you’re getting what you pay for. Thousands of these listings have even been checked in person. Plus, for extra piece of mind, there’s also 24/7 support on hand in case you need any assistance.

10. OneFineStay

OneFineStay luxury vacation rentals

OneFineStay is essentially a luxury Airbnb, offering “distinctive private homes and villas in over 180 destinations—with an unprecedented level of service.”

Each listing is hand-picked, described, and photographed by one of the company’s trained staff members. And before your stay, each home is prepared to exacting standard to ensure you have the best stay possible.

The criteria to be included on OneFineStay is quite simple. The property must be extraordinary. Naturally, this is a site aimed at those with a healthy budget looking for something exclusive. This means the service is that much better, with OneFineStay greeting you on arrival, and ensuring your bathroom is kept stocked up, and your sheets are always kept pristine.

11. TurnKey

TurnKey luxury vacation rentals

TurnKey is another luxury Airbnb alternative. They provide “one-of-a-kind vacation rentals offering the experience of a fine hotel” across 50 locations in the US.

And just like with a fine hotel, TurnKey’s prices reflect what you’re getting. Each property is professionally cleaned and includes all the amenities you need. You have access to a 24/7 local team to answer any questions, or even to make house calls. And you’ll get exceptional communication from the moment you book.

12. Couchsurfing

Couchsurfing: free accommodation

Couchsurfing is your lifeline if you are on a tight budget or traveling solo. This is a site where local hosts open up their houses and allow travelers to stay for free. Hosts will often show you the local culture, share their lives, and do their best to help you experience the best travel ever through Couchsurfing.

This is a unique way to travel and adds a dimension to your adventures that you won’t find through any other site.

Use Caution With Vacation Rental Websites

Remember, when using sites like Airbnb, the onus is on you to communicate with the host. Before making a booking, read the reviews for the accommodation carefully. Ensure you are clear on what to expect on arrival. If the accommodation doesn’t have any reviews, proceed with care. But if it does have good reviews, chances are you’ll have an amazing time!

Which Airbnb Alternative Will You Choose?

If Airbnb just isn’t coming up trumps, or if you just want to try out an Airbnb alternative, this list should have you covered, no matter what your travel budget is.

That’ll leave you with tons more time to plan your trip and book the best value flights out there. Enjoy!

Read the full article: 12 High-Quality Airbnb Alternatives for Any Budget

Airbnb pledges $10 million to New York charities

Airbnb this morning announced the launch of A Fair Share. The initiative promises to donate $10 million to seven organizations, including The New York Immigration Coalition, New York Mortgage Coalition, New York State Rural Housing Coalition Inc., Win, GMHC, CSNYC and Abyssinian Development Corporation. It’s not all just a goodwill gesture, however. As The New […]

Airbnb this morning announced the launch of A Fair Share. The initiative promises to donate $10 million to seven organizations, including The New York Immigration Coalition, New York Mortgage Coalition, New York State Rural Housing Coalition Inc., Win, GMHC, CSNYC and Abyssinian Development Corporation.

It’s not all just a goodwill gesture, however. As The New York Times notes, the generosity comes as the popular subletting service is looking to raise the profile of NY Assembly Bill A7520, which would go a ways toward helping legitimize the service within the confines of the country’s largest metropolitan area.

“We wanted to make the point of what the impact of tax collection and remittances would be if we were able to collect on behalf of our community here,” Airbnb public policy manager Josh Meltzer told the paper.

The service handily points out that the donation would be a fraction of the $100 million in tax revenues that could be raised for the state, should the bill go through. But Airbnb has proven unpopular among many tenants for the impacts it has on neighborhoods.

Earlier this month, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signed a bill aimed at curbing illegal short term rentals, requiring services like Airbnb to include addresses and names of hosts in listings. City Council, meanwhile, also recently struck a blow to ride hailing services like Uber and Lyft by capping the issue of new licenses.

Airbnb shows off new collaboration features that let co-travelers plan trips together

In recent years, Airbnb has been working to expand its business beyond accommodations, by becoming a more robust travel companion with features like guidebooks, suggested experiences, and full-service hospitality for high-end travelers with its still invite-only Airbnb Beyond, for example. Now the company is preparing even more trip-planning features, including support for adding co-travelers to […]

In recent years, Airbnb has been working to expand its business beyond accommodations, by becoming a more robust travel companion with features like guidebooks, suggested experiences, and full-service hospitality for high-end travelers with its still invite-only Airbnb Beyond, for example. Now the company is preparing even more trip-planning features, including support for adding co-travelers to trips and other collaboration features for group travel.

Airbnb offered a sneak peek at these otherwise unannounced features at a recent tech talk given at company headquarters.

“Trip planning is not necessarily complete unless you can share your trip with someone. So now we’re building features that let you add co-travelers – so you can add and share ideas, so you can add comments, so you can collaborate,” said Laura Xu, an Android engineer on Airbnb’s Trip platform, during the presentation. “You can really build out your trip.”

From the screenshots displayed, the co-travelers feature will allow Airbnb users to send invites to people who are joining the trip. This allows everyone to save ideas to a master list, including homes that match their criteria, experiences, food and drink, sights and more. Each item will indicate who added it to the trip. There’s also a way for others to comment on the items, which allows for group conversations about the place or activity.

The company didn’t say how soon the features were arriving.

The focus of this portion of the presentation was to give a look at how a company of Airbnb’s size and scale can change its platform and codebase to support more than just home listings. Over the past couple of years, the company has added support for things like restaurants, concerts, coworking spaces, luxury rentals, and even high-end vacations like castle rentals and even private islands, Xu said.

Now the company is creating a mobile platform that can support its change in focus, as well.

Also offered was a deeper look at of the newer features on mobile, where travelers can add anything to their trip itinerary – like places they want to visit. The feature is integrated with Google Places to pull in photos, directions, open hours, and other details.

Meanwhile, the ‘Organize’ experience under Trips in the Airbnb app is being updated to become a way to plan the entire trip. The company showed off a new trip planner – which hasn’t yet launched – which will include a day-by-day view to see when everything is booked, an embeddable map that shows where everything is booked, and a suggestions feature, so you’re never short on ideas of what to do while in town.

In addition, Airbnb presented a new concept called Trip Platform, which was described as something that powers the end-to-end trip experience on Airbnb, and enables the launch of new tools. It includes easy-to-reuse UI (user interface) components that will make it easier to create and add new features, while maintaining a consistent look and feel across the app.

The tech talk, overall, was focused on what goes into building Airbnb’s iOS and Android apps – something that’s important to the company because over 50% of its incoming traffic is now mobile, and because travelers aren’t generally using a desktop or laptop computer.

Airbnb also hinted towards its longer-term, mobile-first vision – one that has expanded beyond “where I am going to stay” to now include “what am I going to do?” but hasn’t yet addressed the question, “where am I going to go?” It could help with that latter query by introducing more discovery features, but these plans weren’t discussed during the talk.

We’ve reached out to Airbnb to get more information on these additions, but the company has not offered an official response.

Airbnb Tech Talk: Native Product Development

Are you curious about what goes into building Airbnb's iOS and Android apps? Join us to hear Airbnb native engineers cover in-house technologies that facilitate product development, along with learnings from large-scale product launches. RSVP to attend in person: https://airbnbmobile.splashthat.com/

Posted by Airbnb Engineering on Tuesday, August 7, 2018

How Airbnb went from renting air beds for $10 to a $30 billion hospitality behemoth

Happy 10th anniversary Airbnb. When we first wrote about the company a decade ago, it was a spare website cobbled together by its founders for the low low price of $20,000. AirBed And Breakfast Takes Pad Crashing To A Whole New Level In the years since, the marketplace Airbnb created has radically transformed the rental […]

Happy 10th anniversary Airbnb.

When we first wrote about the company a decade ago, it was a spare website cobbled together by its founders for the low low price of $20,000.

In the years since, the marketplace Airbnb created has radically transformed the rental landscape in cities, created an entirely new hospitality market and surged to a valuation of roughly $31 billion.

As it prepares for an initial public offering in 2019, it’s worth a look back on how far the company has come, and how its founders’ vision for a new type of way to monetize unused apartment space for budget travelers has become the engine driving a new kind of travel and new experiments in modern living (for better or worse).

When we wrote about the company in 2008, the pitch for Airbnb’s services had already been set.

AirBed and Breakfast will definitely appeal to younger travelers, and conventioneers who can’t find a regular hotel room. In overbooked Denver, where 20,000 people will be descending for the Democratic National Convention, hotels are already sold out. More than 600 people have found alternative accommodations through AirBed and Breakfast, and 50 to 100 new listings appear every day. Prices range from $20 a night for an airbed to $3,000 for an entire house.

Indeed, it’s likely that there would have been no Airbnb without the 2008 presidential campaign. The election created a serendipitous confluence of an incredibly unique historical moment where a groundswell of demand could be met by a new type of supply and Airbnb’s co-founders Brian Chesky and Joe Gebbia were there to capitalize on the opportunity.

It’s good to remember that in 2008, the co-founders were claiming that they could barely make rent. And they were certainly strapped for cash for the fledgling business. There, again, the 2008 election presented them with an opportunity.

“The world thought we were crazy,” Gebbia recalled in an interview.

But the RISD grads had that $20,000 in seed funding and politically themed cereal boxes to tide the business over. It was the cereal gimmick — selling Obama O’s and Captain McCains – for $40 a box that got them the hearing from Y Combinator co-founder Paul Graham and acceptance into the accelerator.

Three years later, the business was a rocket ship. It had pulled in a (whopping for the time) $112 million investment from Andreessen Horowitz, DST Global, and General Catalyst and was already on the path to bulldozing the old models of hospitality with a shared vision for visiting any city anywhere in the world.

“Airbnb, with its strong management team and engaged worldwide community is on a path to become a transformational company,” said Yuri Milner founder of DST Global, in a truly understated statement at the time.

So transformational, in fact, that the company would go on to raise billions more atop that hundred-million-plus Series B round.

But that success has not come without a certain cost.

For all of the ways in which Airbnb claims to be unlocking the local economy, it can’t avoid the accusations that it has locked out local renters in favor of financial speculators who are buying up apartments to lease to a traveling class rather than sustain a viable and vibrant neighborhood for the actual citizens that live there.

One study, published earlier this year (and funded by the AFL-CIO and the Hotel Trades Council), indicated that the company significantly impacted rental prices in New York.

… the study estimates that Airbnb has driven up long-term rental prices by 1.4 percent, or $384 per year, for the median New York City renter. The research suggests that both restricted availability in the long-term rental market and increased financial incentives in the short-term rental market account for this increase.

It’s those kinds of figures that have led to the sometimes aggressive pushback from local real estate advocates. Indeed, it was just about three years ago that San Francisco protestors from the Coalition on Homelessness took over Airbnbs headquarters to protest what they viewed as the company’s complicity in the surge in evictions and homelessness in the city.

In a 2015 letter to New York legislators, Airbnb’s public policy chief at the time, David Hantman, wrote, “The majority of hosts use the money they earn to pay their bills and stay in their homes.”

And in a separate blog post (now apparently lost in a site redesign) around the same time, Hantman took Airbnb’s argument further. “In fact, Airbnb makes cities more affordable,” Hantman was quoted as writing in Vice. “Sixty two percent of Airbnb hosts in New York said Airbnb helped them stay in their homes and the typical Airbnb host in New York earns $7,530 per year — a modest, but significant amount that can make a huge difference for families.”

The company’s kerfuffles with regulators (a sort of mirror image of the woes faced by fellow marketplace service Uber and its American competitor Lyft) have not effected the way investors are valuing the virtual room-for-rent-filled house that Chesky and Gebbia have built.

As we reported earlier this year, Airbnb raised nearly $4.4 billion in funding as a private company, to date, and reports say it is on track to make between $3.5 billion and $4 billion in revenues this year from its business connecting travelers with private homes and an array of other related services.

That’s a long, long way from matching would-be attendees to the 2008 Democratic National Convention with air mattresses or sofas in Denver.

New unicorn Klook raises $200M to expand its travel activities platform worldwide

Klook, a Hong Kong-based startup developing a travel activities platform, has pulled in $200 million in new capital to fuel a major expansion into the U.S. and Europe. A spokesperson confirmed to TechCrunch that the round values the company at more than $1 billion, although the company didn’t provide an exact figure. Klook sets out […]

Klook, a Hong Kong-based startup developing a travel activities platform, has pulled in $200 million in new capital to fuel a major expansion into the U.S. and Europe. A spokesperson confirmed to TechCrunch that the round values the company at more than $1 billion, although the company didn’t provide an exact figure.

Klook sets out to make booking travel activities as easy as arranging flights and hotels. That could mean visits to adventure parks, scuba diving, more localized tours or basics such as train travel, food or airport transfers, all of which can be found, paid for and taken using Klook’s platform. The company claims to offer more than 50,000 activities and services from 5,000 partners in over 200 destinations across the world. The startup claims its platform is on track to gross $1 billion in bookings — which is not take home revenue — for this year.

That booking milestone is “not just a representation of how Klook has grown but also a representation of this space,” Klook co-founder and COO Eric Gnock Fah told TechCrunch in an interview. “A lot of people thought this was a very niche sector, but it is proving to be a very valuable industry [and] we’re glad to be the leader.”

There’s plenty of evidence to support that. Travel giant Booking.com jumped into the space via an acquisition earlier this year, while TripAdvisor and Airbnb are pushing the activities side of their businesses, too. More direct competition to Klook includes Taiwan’s KKday, which is aligned with Japanese travel giant H.I.S., U.S.-based Peek, Culture Trip, GetYourGuide and Headout.

Klook is the best-funded by some mile, having raised plenty of capital over the past year or so. It closed a $30 million Series B in March 2017 before adding a $60 million Series C the following October, and this new round takes it to nearly $300 million to date.

The new deal sees existing backers Sequoia China, Matrix Partners, and Goldman Sachs return to put in more capital. They’re joined by first-time investors China’s Boyu Capital, Technology Crossover Ventures (TCV) — which has backed Airbnb among others — and Israel’s OurCrowd, while an undisclosed Asian sovereign wealth fund and unnamed family offices also took part.

Four-year-old Klook has been in expansion mode for the past year, opening offices in London and Amsterdam and growing its headcount to 600 staff across 16 offices, predominantly in Asia. That’s up from 400 people across 13 offices last October.

Now, the company is eying the U.S. and a greater share of Europe. That’s not new, per se, Gnock Fah last year told us that North America was in the roadmap, but now the company has confirmed it’ll open a U.S. office before the end of 2018.

“It’s very likely to be East Coast — New York — where we’d start off in the U.S., but I believe we’ll scale up to have teams on the West Coast and probably mid-West, too,” Gnock Fah said. “We also continue to be expanding in Europe and look for the next location to set up more offices.”

This goal push is two-fold. It’s aimed at tapping into the increased demand for global travel from Asian tourists, and particularly those in China, whilst also bringing Western travelers to Asia where they can tap into Klook’s ecosystem of activities and services.

“This round is really gearing up to global expansion,” Gnock Fah said. “There’s still plenty of growth in Asia but now we will be really accelerating our growth into the U.S. and Europe. We’re really entering the global stage [and attracting an investor like] TCV is a testament to what we’re looking to achieve as a global player.”

The Klook COO also added that the company is seeking to open a new R&D center to supplement its existing tech hub that’s located in Shenzhen. The location for that new office is likely to be in Asia, he added, although its efforts will support the business worldwide.

Airbnb for Work now accounts for 15 percent of bookings

Business travelers have become an increasingly important part of the Airbnb business, according to a new blog post. The company says that Airbnb for Work, which launched in 2014, has seen bookings triple from 2015 to 2016, and triple again from 2016 to 2017. In fact, Airbnb says that almost 700,000 companies have signed up […]

Business travelers have become an increasingly important part of the Airbnb business, according to a new blog post. The company says that Airbnb for Work, which launched in 2014, has seen bookings triple from 2015 to 2016, and triple again from 2016 to 2017. In fact, Airbnb says that almost 700,000 companies have signed up for and booked with Airbnb for Work.

Interestingly, the breakdown of companies working with Airbnb for traveler lodging are pretty diverse — employees from large enterprise companies (5,000+ employees) and employees from startups and SMBs (one to 250 employees) take a 40-40 split, with the final 20 percent of Airbnb for Work bookings going to mid-sized companies.

In July of 2017, Airbnb started making its listings available via SAP Concur, a tool used by a large number of business travelers. Airbnb says that this integration has been a huge help to growing Airbnb for Work, with Concur seeing a 42 percent increase in employees expensing Airbnb stays from 2016 to 2017. Moreover, 63 percent of Concur’s Fortune 500 clients have booked a business trip on Airbnb.

One interesting trend that Airbnb has noticed is that nearly 60 percent of Airbnb for Work trips had more than one guest.

“We can offer big open areas for collaborations, while still giving employees their own private space,” said David Holyoke, global head of business travel at Airbnb. “We think this offers a more meaningful business trip and it saves the company a lot of money.”

Given the tremendous growth of the business segment, as well as the opportunity it represents, Airbnb is working on new features for business travelers. In fact, in the next week, Airbnb will be launching a new feature that lets employees search for Airbnb listings on a company-specific landing page.

So, for example, a Google employee might search for their lodging on Google.Airbnb.com, and the site would be refined to cater to Google’s preferences, including locations close to the office, budget, and other factors.

While the growth has picked up, Holyoke still sees Airbnb for Work as an opportunity to grow. He said that Airbnb for Work listings only represent 15 percent of all Airbnb trips.

But, the introduction of boutique hotels and other amenity-driven listings such as those on Airbnb Plus are paving the way for business travelers to lean toward Airbnb instead of a business hotel.

Plus, as mobility and relocation become even more important to how a business operates, Airbnb believes it can be a useful tool to help employees get started in a new town before they purchase a home.

The Best Airbnb Clones for Cars, Boats, and Other Rental Services

best-airbnb-clones

There are plenty of benefits to renting your next vacation stay through Airbnb, but that’s not the only peer-to-peer service that makes rentals easy. You can use these Airbnb-like alternatives for renting cars, office space, boats, and much more. Airbnb for Cars ZipCar requires a monthly membership fee. Car2Go’s selection is limited. And standard car rental services are often inconvenient. With peer-to-peer sharing sites that operate like Airbnb, you only pay for the car rental when you need it, and they also have a wide variety of car types and makes. Two of the larger sites—GetAround and Turo—cover insurace, and…

Read the full article: The Best Airbnb Clones for Cars, Boats, and Other Rental Services

There are plenty of benefits to renting your next vacation stay through Airbnb, but that’s not the only peer-to-peer service that makes rentals easy.

You can use these Airbnb-like alternatives for renting cars, office space, boats, and much more.

Airbnb for Cars

ZipCar requires a monthly membership fee. Car2Go’s selection is limited. And standard car rental services are often inconvenient.

With peer-to-peer sharing sites that operate like Airbnb, you only pay for the car rental when you need it, and they also have a wide variety of car types and makes.

Two of the larger sites—GetAround and Turo—cover insurace, and GetAround provides 24/7 roadside assistance. Turo provides roadside assistance only with select trips.

GetAround

GetAround listings include information on etiquette (Is the car pet-friendly for example?), and of course the typical Airbnb type features that you’ll find in the car.

Where is it available? Get Around is available in only six US cities: San Francisco, Berkley, Chicago, Oakland, Portland, and Washington D.C.

What are the rental options? You can rent cars for as little as $5 per hour. The longer you rent a car, the cheaper the hourly price is.

What types of cars are available? You can rent SUVs, coupes, sedans, minivans, convertibles, hatchbacks, pickup trucks, and cargo vans. GetAround also offers electric cars including Teslas.

How does search work? The primary search function on GetAround relies on location. You can search for cars available in your location and then filter results by price range, car make, car category, car class, and, transmission.

What are the limitations? While you can rent by the hour or the day, some cars have a minimum number of hours for a rental (e.g. two or four hours), but there are cars available to rent for just one hour if that’s all you need.

Turo

Turo listings are accompanied by info about the cars’ features and extras. You can also see info on the car owner’s response rate.

It’s also worth noting that Turo will check your auto insurance score before granting you access to the site.

Where is it available? Turo is available in far more places than GetAround, serving 5,500 cities and 300+ airports across the US, Canada, Germany, and the UK.

What are the rental options? Turo rentals start at $10 per hour and up. The longer you rent the car, the cheaper the per hour rate becomes. For an added $10 fee, Turo car owners can bring the car to you.

What types of cars are available? You can rent sedans, SUVs, minivans, trucks, and vans.

How does search work? You can search cars by location, after which you can use a filter to narrow results by price range, features, vehicle type, make, year, number of seats, categories (elite, upscale, fuel sippers etc.), colors, and transmission.

What are the limitations? Some cars have a mileage limitation. If you exceed that mileage, you’ll be charged per mile at a rate determined by the car owner.

Airbnb for Boats

Airbnb itself does have listings for houseboats, but if you want a wider selection, you might want to check out boat-specific sites.

These sites aren’t just for swanky yachts. You can also use them to rent jet skis, kayaks, and of course, houseboats.

BoatSetter

Boatsetter

BoatSetter listings include features for each boat, reviews, and how many people are viewing the vessel. Features include capacity, boat rules, response rate, and response time.

And if you have no boating experience—not to worry. BoatSetter rentals can also come with a captain who will manage the sailing, while you enjoy your day out on the water.

Where is it available? BoatSetter is available in 2,100+ cities worldwide.

What are the rental options? You can rent boats for half a day (which can run about four hours), for a full day, or for several days.

How does search work? When searching for a boat on BoatSetter, you’ll start by entering your location, party size, and trip date. You can filter your search results by specific activities: fishing, sailing, water sports, cruising, and celebrating.

You can also filter by power vs. sail. And that’s not all—you can narrow search results by price, size, features, and categories (jet ski, schooner, catamaran etc.).

GetMyBoat

GetMyBoat also offers the option of booking your rental with a captain.

Where is it available? GetMyBoat is available in 184 countries worldwide.

What are the rental options? You can rent a vessel per hour or per day. In addition to a rental fee, you’ll also have to pay a service fee.

How does search work? Search begins with location, and then you can filter your search results by minimum and maximum prices, minimum and maximum capacity, availability of a captain, listing type (e.g. pontoon, jet ski, day sailer etc.), features, and if you’re knowledgeable, you can even narrow your results by make and model.

Airbnb for Office Space

Coworking spaces are quite common across the United States, and beyond. Some companies offer office space nationwide, but you should also look into your own local options. Coworking search engines like Coworker can take the hard work out of it.

There are popular options like WeWork which is available across the US and in over 20 other countries worldwide, but you have to pay a hefty monthly fee. Instead, why not find a desk in an office space that you can use whenever you need to, without having to pay a membership fee?

LiquidSpace

LiquidSpace is a membership free option for finding working space to rent for your ad-hoc use.

Where is it available? LiquidSpace is available in 1,150 cities in the United States, Canada, and Australia.

What are the rental options? You can rent spaces by the hour or by the day. If you rent for a full day, the hourly price goes down. (Some locations are available only by the day.)

How does search work? As with most of these sites, a search begins with location. You can then filter your search results by dates and times, neighborhood, space type (desk, office, suite), price range, capacity, environment, and amenities.

ShareDesk

airbnb alternatives for other kinds of rental needs

ShareDesk allows you to rent just a desk in a working hub or a private office. They also offer options for meeting rooms,

Listings include features and amenities, but there are no reviews on the listings.

Where is it available? ShareDesk is available at over 4,500 locations in 4,500 venues in 440 cities across 70 countries. Some cities (like New York for example) have far more options than other cities (like Washington DC).

What are the rental options? You can rent a desk in a public working space or hub, conference space, and in some locations, can find rentals suitable for executive level meetings.

How does search work? You begin a search by location and office type (meeting spaces or working spaces). You can then filter your search results by term (hourly, daily, or monthly), price range, dates, and venue category (shared, hub, pro, and exec.)

Croissant is another option for working spaces, but does include a membership fee, albeit at a much cheaper rate than WeWork. And PivotDesk also makes it easy to find office space, but the rentals are only available on a monthly basis.

Airbnb for Parking and Storage

There are other Airbnb like sites popping up for all kinds of services. If you’re looking for an Airbnb for parking, there are a few sites that are beginning to fill that space.

Pavemint is available as an iOS app to help you find parking spaces in the Los Angeles area.

Parqex is available as an iOS and Android app, and features parking listings in several US cities including Chicago, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Miami, and Washington D.C.

If you’re looking for storage space, rather than pay around $100 a month for a small space, you can look for peer-to-peer options using sites like Neighbor and Spacer (which also includes parking spaces).

Other Peer-to-Peer Rental Services

There are plenty more peer-to-peer rentals worth considering. Sites like Zilok are a rental marketplace for just about anything you might be looking for including computers, cameras, and gaming consoles. To rent an item through Zilok, you’ll have to pay a security deposit you’ll get back once the item is returned to its owner.

If you’re looking for a “rental” for your furry friend while you go out of town, Rover makes it easy to find welcoming homes for your dogs.

If you’re looking for photographic equipment, FatLama is an option worth considering—or if you prefer to rent from a company, take a look at BorrowLenses. Indeed, all photographers should consider renting before buying.

Read the full article: The Best Airbnb Clones for Cars, Boats, and Other Rental Services