How to Record a Voiceover in Adobe Premiere Pro

record-voiceover-premiere

From product reviews on YouTube to tutorial videos and Hollywood films, voiceovers are a common video production technique. If you want to record voiceovers in Adobe Premiere Pro, but don’t know where to start, here’s everything you need to know. Configuring Your Microphone Before recording your voiceover, you need to connect your microphone to your computer and then configure Premiere Pro. Open the Audio Hardware options by going to Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio Hardware. This menu allows you to configure all things audio hardware related. It may look confusing, but there’s only one setting to change. Underneath Default…

Read the full article: How to Record a Voiceover in Adobe Premiere Pro

From product reviews on YouTube to tutorial videos and Hollywood films, voiceovers are a common video production technique. If you want to record voiceovers in Adobe Premiere Pro, but don’t know where to start, here’s everything you need to know.

Configuring Your Microphone

Before recording your voiceover, you need to connect your microphone to your computer and then configure Premiere Pro.

Open the Audio Hardware options by going to Premiere Pro > Preferences > Audio Hardware.

Premiere Pro audio hardware menu

This menu allows you to configure all things audio hardware related. It may look confusing, but there’s only one setting to change. Underneath Default Input, use the drop-down menu to select your microphone.

There may be other options here such as “Built-in Microphone”, or “No input”. As I’m using a “Blue Yeti” microphone, this shows up in the list as “Yeti Stereo Microphone”.

Premiere Pro default input

Once you’ve chosen a default input, press OK to exit the Audio Hardware preferences panel.

Recording Your Voiceover

On your timeline, you should now see the Voice-Over Record button. This is a small microphone, which is to the right of the Mute and Solo buttons on your audio tracks.

Premiere Pro voice over record button

Once you press the voice-over record button, you won’t be able to talk immediately. Premiere Pro will count down from three, and then begin recording at zero. This gives you a little time to prepare after pressing record.

Premiere Pro voiceover record countdown

You can see this countdown inside your Program Monitor, accessible through the Window > Program Monitor > Sequence Name menu.

Premiere Pro program monitor menu items

Once recording, Premiere Pro will show the words “Recording”, underneath the program monitor.

Premiere Pro recording status

When recording, take note of your Audio Meters. These are found in the Window > Audio Meters menu.

When playing back an edit, or recording a voiceover, these audio meters show the status of your audio. Measured in Decibels (dB), they start at minus 60, and peak at zero. When recording, you should ensure that your audio does not “clip”. Clipping happens when the audio source is too loud for your microphone. The sound will distort, and generally sound bad.

By using the audio meters, you can ensure clipping does not occur. Any signal which starts clipping will turn red at the top of your audio meters. Yellow on the audio meters means the signal is not clipping yet but is close to doing so.

Premiere Pro clipping audio meters

You should aim to have your voice reach -9 to -12 dB on the meters. This should be green and will provide a good balance. It’s not too quiet, but it’s not clipping. It gives you a little room to get louder before you encounter any problems with clipping.

If you hover your mouse over the edge of the audio meters, you can click and drag to enlarge them. If you enlarge too far, the meters will switch from vertical (loudest sounds at the top) to horizontal (loudest sounds at the right).

If you’d like to listen to yourself speaking, connect a pair of headphones. You can use speakers, but the sound being recording will get picked up by your microphone, and cause feedback.

When you’ve finished speaking, press the spacebar to stop recording. Your new recording will then appear in the timeline, ready for editing.

Editing Your Voiceover

Once you’re finished recording, you can begin editing. Use the Ripple Edit tool (covered in these Premiere Pro speed tips) to save yourself a lot of time when cutting and removing any unnecessary “umms”, background noises, or unwanted sounds.

When you’ve finished editing, you may find that your whole voiceover is now split into hundreds of smaller clips. This isn’t a big problem, but it may be inconvenient when adjusting the volume or adding effects later on.

To remedy this, select all of your clips in the timeline. Once selected, they will turn light gray:

Premiere Pro selected clips

Right-click, and choose Nest. Enter a suitable name and then choose OK.

Premiere Pro nest menu item

Premiere Pro has now nested your voiceover. Instead of multiple individual clips, you have one larger clip. If you want to access the original clips again, double-click on the master clip in your timeline or Project Browser.

If you need to increase or reduce the volume of your voiceover (providing it’s not clipping), you can do so in the Effect Controls section. Accessed through the Window > Effect Controls menu.

Premiere Pro effect controls menu

Under the Audio Effects > Volume > Level control, you can increase or decrease the volume. You will only be able to increase a maximum of 6dB, but you can reduce the volume by an almost unlimited amount.

Using Audio Effects in Premiere Pro

After recording, performing a basic edit, and adjusting the volume (if required), you can move on to applying effects. Here are two easy effects, which you can start using immediately.

Get started by opening the Effects panel, found in the Window > Effects menu.

Search for Multiband Compressor, and drag it into your voiceover. The Effect Controls section will now show the multiband compressor effect. Choose the Edit button next to Custom Setup, and the multiband compressor will appear. You can increase or reduce the volume here, but a compressor serves to even out your voice. It will reduce the volume of louder phrases, and increase the volume of quieter phrases. The default preset of Broadcast is suitable for most applications.

Premiere Pro multiband compressor effect

The second effect to use is the Parametric Equalizer. This alters the sound of certain frequencies. Search for it in the effects panel, and then drag it onto your voiceover. Press the Edit button, and change the preset to Vocal Enhancer. This preset will increase the high end, and reduce the low end. This will help to reduce any low rumblings from passing traffic, or excessive sibilance from your voice.

Premiere Pro parametric equalizer effect

Once you’re confident, you may wish to play around with audio effects. See what happens if you push sliders to their maximum.

If you’ve played around to find some good effects for your voice, then you can save them into a custom Premiere Pro preset by following our guide to Premiere Pro presets.

More Tips for Recording Voiceovers

If you’re recording your own voiceovers, it’s worth understanding how microphones work, and learning the differences between condenser vs. dynamic mics. Knowing how microphones work is something which can help to further improve your recording quality.

And when you feel confident that you’re up to speed with everything involved, why not use the tricks learnt here to start your own podcast?

Read the full article: How to Record a Voiceover in Adobe Premiere Pro

How to Start Using Color Correction in Adobe Premiere Pro

color-correction-premiere

Color correction can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your videos. From home-made style videos which may be very yellow to professional-looking productions, getting started with color correction in Adobe Premiere Pro couldn’t be simpler. Here’s everything you need to know. Color Correction vs. Color Grading Before making any edits, it’s important to clarify the difference between Color Correction and Color Grading. Color correction is the process of “balancing” an image. This involves increasing or decreasing the exposure, contrast, and shadows, to reproduce what your eye expects to see, and what the scene actually looked like. While there…

Read the full article: How to Start Using Color Correction in Adobe Premiere Pro

color-correction-premiere

Color correction can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your videos. From home-made style videos which may be very yellow to professional-looking productions, getting started with color correction in Adobe Premiere Pro couldn’t be simpler.

Here’s everything you need to know.

Color Correction vs. Color Grading

Before making any edits, it’s important to clarify the difference between Color Correction and Color Grading.

Color correction is the process of “balancing” an image. This involves increasing or decreasing the exposure, contrast, and shadows, to reproduce what your eye expects to see, and what the scene actually looked like. While there can be some artistic choices made at this stage, it’s about reproducing the scene as it looked in real life, and producing a nice image.

Premiere Pro color wheels

Color grading is usually performed after color correction. This involves changing the colors to something different. Films like The Matrix have a green tint, and many Hollywood blockbusters use a teal and orange grade. Color grading is as much about artistic choices as technical accuracy.

This tutorial will focus on the basics of color correction, although some of these tips will also apply to color grading.

Using the Lumetri Color Tool

The Lumetri Color tool is one of the most common ways to color correct footage in Adobe Premiere Pro. While there are other methods, along with different tools available in other video-editing packages, the basic concepts are the same regardless of your choice of tool.

Open the Lumetri Color panel by going to Window > Lumetri Color. Alternatively, you can go to Window > Workspaces > Color, to open the Color Workspace, which contains various different tools for analyzing and adjusting colors in video.

Premiere Pro Lumetri Color menu entry

On your timeline, select the clip you want to start color correcting. The Lumetri Color tool will change from grayed out to colored, indicating that it’s ready to use.

Premiere Pro Lumetri Color tabs

The Lumetri Color tool contains six tabs, each one containing tools for a specific color correction task. These are:

  1. Basic Correction: Tools for balancing the image, and correcting under or over-exposure, white balance, contrast, and saturation.
  2. Creative: Tools for working with LUTs, film grain effects, and color tint.
  3. Curves: Tools for adjusting hue, saturation, and contrast for specific colors or the whole image.
  4. Color Wheels & Match: Individual tools for adjusting shadows, midtones, and highlights.
  5. HSL Secondary: Tools for working with hue, saturation, and luminance.
  6. Vignette: Tools for adding a vignette.

These tabs may seem overwhelming, but it’s not as difficult as it looks. By clicking each tab, you can expand to see the tools and information for each section. The small checkbox to the right of the tab name will enable or disable that particular adjustment. This is a quick way to see a before and after view of some of your changes.

We’ve covered Color Wheels & Match in our guide to using the color match tool. In addition to that, our guide to making your own LUTs covers some aspects of the Creative tab. As color correction is different from color grading, these tips will focus on the Basic Correction tab.

Basic Correction in Adobe Premiere Pro

Here’s the footage we’ll be working with. It’s a close-up shot of somebody playing the guitar at a live music event:

Person playing guitar, before color correction

Let’s dig into the tools found in the Basic Correction tab.

Premiere Pro Lumetri Color Basic Correction tools

Handy Tip: when making any adjustments using the Lumetri Color panel, double-click a slider to reset it to its default value.

The first tool is Input LUT. We’ve discussed LUTs previously, and they are essentially the same as Instagram filters. You won’t need to use any LUTs when learning the basics—they can sometimes cause more problems than they solve.

Moving on to White Balance. Here you can adjust the temperature and tint of the white balance. You can “cool things down” by adding more blue to the image (temperature slider to the left). You can “warm things up” by moving the temperature slider to the right (which in turn adds more orange).

By using the WB Selector, you can choose a point in your video which should be white, and Premiere Pro will attempt to guess the correct white balance settings. This isn’t perfect, but it can be a good starting point.

Here’s the example image after correcting the white balance. It’s not finished yet, but it already looks a lot better:

Premiere Pro corrected white balance

If you’d like to learn more about white balance, take a moment to read our guide to white balance.

Underneath white balance is the Tone section. This contains controls for contrast, exposure, highlights, shadows, and more. At the bottom right of these controls is a button labeled Auto. By pressing this button, Premiere Pro will attempt to color correct your footage for you. It doesn’t always do a great job, but it can be a good starting point.

Here’s our example image after pressing the auto button:

Premiere Pro auto button corrected color

While this image has improved in some areas, the auto button has raised some new issues. Here’s what the Lumetri sliders look like now:

Premiere Pro Lumetri tone sliders

Premiere Pro has boosted the Exposure and Whites sliders, while making minor reductions to all the other sliders.

With each slider, moving to the right will increase the effect of that particular area, and moving to the right will decrease the effect. Here’s what they all do:

  1. Exposure: Brightens or darkens the whole image.
  2. Contrast: Add or remove contrast.
  3. Highlights: Brighten or darken only the highlights.
  4. Shadows: Brighten or darken only the shadows.
  5. Whites: Increase or decrease the intensity of any white pixels.
  6. Blacks: Increse or decrease the intensity of any black pixels.
  7. HDR Specular: Not available unless working with high dynamic range (HDR) footage.

By reducing the white level, and increasing the contrast, the image looks much better:

Premiere Pro color corrected image

While each video is different, the best way to learn is by experimenting. Press the auto button, move the sliders to their maximum and minimum levels and take note of what happens. By increasing or decreasing the level of the shadows, for example, it’s possible to brighten or darken your video.

The final control under the Tone section is Saturation. Saturation alters the intensity of the colors in an image. By moving this all the way to the left, the image will become black and white. All the way to the right, and it will become saturated. Colors will look unrealistic and fake.

Like many adjustments, small changes can make a big difference. There’s no need to make big extreme changes. The colors in the example shot are quite bright and vivid, so a slight reduction of saturation by 10 percent is enough to improve the shot:

Premiere Pro image with reduced saturation

Kick Your Premiere Pro Skills Up a Notch

The before and after images of the example color correction shot show what a big difference color correction can make. Often, it’s only when looking at both versions of an image side-by-side you see how bad the image was before you applied color correction.

While there are many other tools available in the Lumetri Color panel, mastering the basics will give you an excellent foundation to build upon. If you’re finding that Premiere Pro is slowing you down, take a look at these Premiere Pro speedy workflow tips.

Read the full article: How to Start Using Color Correction in Adobe Premiere Pro

How to Make Your Own Adobe Premiere Pro Presets

make-own-premiere-presets

Are you fed up with performing the same repetitive tasks in Premiere Pro? Do you often find yourself getting bored and wasting time with mundane and repetitive edits, instead of the fun and creative challenge of producing a video? Premiere Pro presets are an excellent way to automate repetitive tasks and to free yourself to work on the creative side of editing. Here’s everything you need to know… Working with effects in Premiere Pro can be demanding on your computer, so if your computer is struggling to cope you should learn about offline video editing. Why Use a Premiere Pro…

Read the full article: How to Make Your Own Adobe Premiere Pro Presets

make-own-premiere-presets

Are you fed up with performing the same repetitive tasks in Premiere Pro? Do you often find yourself getting bored and wasting time with mundane and repetitive edits, instead of the fun and creative challenge of producing a video?

Premiere Pro presets are an excellent way to automate repetitive tasks and to free yourself to work on the creative side of editing. Here’s everything you need to know…

Working with effects in Premiere Pro can be demanding on your computer, so if your computer is struggling to cope you should learn about offline video editing.

Why Use a Premiere Pro Effects Preset?

Effects presets can save you a large amount of time.

If you’re a video editor or YouTube content creator, you may have dozens of effects or common editing tasks you perform on every video. With effects presets, you can speed up your workflow into a one-click process. Here are some common editing tasks I perform when editing some of our review videos here at MakeUseOf:

  • Apply EQ, compression and adjust the gain on a voiceover
  • Apply a narrow 300 HZ cut to background music
  • Animate keyframes for rotation, scale, and position

Premiere Pro compression effect

These edits only take a few minutes each, but over the course of a whole video edit, they can add up to hours. It may sound clichéd, but time is money when it comes to video editing, and saving two to three hours on every video leads to a huge increase in time and productivity over the course of several weeks and months.

How to Make Your Own Presets

In order to save your own presets, you need to use the Effect Controls Panel and perform an initial edit. This could be a speed ramp, a creative transition, or even a simple volume boost.

For this example. I’ve used the Corner Pin effect:

Premiere Pro corner pin effect

Creating a preset from a single effect is very simple. Right-click on your effect name inside the effect controls panel, and choose Save Preset:

Premiere Pro save preset

You’ll be prompted to enter a name and description. Enter some suitable text, and leave the Type at the default of Scale. Press OK and you’re done. Your very first preset is complete, in less than 30 seconds.

Premiere Pro preset naming

If you’d like to save multiple effects into one preset, hold the Command key on macOS, or the Control key on Windows, and click to select multiple effects. When an effect is selected, it will turn light gray.

Premiere Pro multiple effects selected

When it’s time to use your preset, you’ll need to open the Effects panel, found in the Window > Effects menu. Expand the Presets folder, or use the search bar to find your preset.

Premiere Pro Effects Panel

Click and drag your preset onto your clip on the timeline, or select your clip, and then click and drag your preset onto the Video Effects section of the Effect Controls panel. The effects control panel will now show all of the effects, settings, and keyframes you created when you first saved your preset.

Advanced Presets: Setting Anchors to In or Out Points

When creating a preset for the first time, you’re prompted to specify a Type, which defaults to Scale.

This type is only used when you have used keyframes in your preset. It defines the duration and handling of keyframes when the preset is applied.

When you use Scale, Premiere Pro will adjust the effect duration depending on the length of your clip. If you created your effect with a 24-frame duration, and you drag it on to a clip with a 48-frame duration, then Premiere Pro will extend the effect to cover the full 48-frame duration.

Premiere Pro preset type

This is good most of the time, but it may not always be what you want. The types Achor To In Point, and Anchor to Out Point both anchor the effect to the In or Out point respectively. This will maintain the duration you defined at creation.

If you create a keyframe with a duration of 24 frames and anchor it to the In point when applied, your clip will start the preset at the beginning of the clip, and then continue for 24 frames.

If anchored to the Out point, the preset will begin 24 frames before the end of the clip.

These types are a very powerful way to configure your presets. If you’re still unsure how they work, the best way to learn is to create presets with each of the types selected, and then drag them onto a clip and inspect the keyframes inside the Effect Controls panel.

How to Modify Your Own Presets

If you’d like to change a preset name, type, or description, all you have to do is Right Click on your preset inside the Effects panel, and choose Preset Properties. You’ll be presented with the same menu you used when you originally created the preset.

Premiere Pro preset properties menu

If you’d like to change effects or effect properties within a preset, you have to create a new preset based on the old one. It’s a straightforward process:

  1. Drag your preset onto a clip.
  2. Modify the effects properties.
  3. Create a new preset with your changed effects.
  4. Delete the old preset.

How to Import and Export Your Custom Presets

It’s a very simple process to import or export your custom presets. Start by Right Clicking inside the presets folder in the Effects panel. Choose either Import Presets or Export Presets.

Premiere Pro import/export preset menu

Adobe Premiere Pro will prompt you for a file location. Choose a folder to store your presets (if exporting), or a previously exported file (if importing). Press OK and Premiere Pro will populate your presets folder, or generate a file containing your presets.

How Much Time Will You Save?

Now that you know just how easy it is to use presets with Adobe Premiere Pro, there’s no reason not to use them. From working with LUTs to cutting a video into clips, there are numerous tasks that can benefit from custom preset creation.

Read the full article: How to Make Your Own Adobe Premiere Pro Presets

How to Use the Adobe Premiere Pro Color Match Tool

adobe-premiere-color-match

Color correction and color grading can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your videos. From white balance correction to contrast, saturation, mid tones, and more, there’s a lot to learn. Fortunately for our sanity, Adobe Premiere Pro has an automatic color match tool built in. And in this article we’ll explain how to use this tool to color grade your video footage. What You’ll Need to Get Started Before you can begin working with Premiere Pro’s color match tool, you need to ensure you’re able to use it. To start with, you need the Premiere Pro CC April…

Read the full article: How to Use the Adobe Premiere Pro Color Match Tool

adobe-premiere-color-match

Color correction and color grading can have a dramatic impact on the quality of your videos. From white balance correction to contrast, saturation, mid tones, and more, there’s a lot to learn.

Fortunately for our sanity, Adobe Premiere Pro has an automatic color match tool built in. And in this article we’ll explain how to use this tool to color grade your video footage.

What You’ll Need to Get Started

Before you can begin working with Premiere Pro’s color match tool, you need to ensure you’re able to use it.

To start with, you need the Premiere Pro CC April 2018 12.1 release. This update added the color match tool, so you won’t be able to use it on older versions such as CS6.

You’ll also need a powerful computer to start color correcting and grading with Premiere Pro. Adobe Premiere isn’t always very efficient, and color correction is very demanding on a system. You may want to consider building a budget 4K editing computer. Alternatively, you can generate optimized proxies, or perform these Premiere Pro performance tips.

Once you have the correct version of Premiere Pro and a suitably powerful computer, import your footage, and get your initial edit ready to go.

Prepare Your References

The color match tool works by studying a reference image or video and applying changes to the source footage. In order to use it, you will need to import a reference image or video, and put it on your timeline. You can delete it once your color matching is complete.

You can use your own videos or images for reference. One way to get started quickly with color grading is by using images from a Hollywood movie. If you find a scene you would like to replicate, then take a screenshot and import it.

Using the Color Match Tool

Once you’re ready to go, using the color match tool is a simple process. Get started by opening the Lumetri Color panel from the Window > Lumetri Color menu.

Lumetri Color menu option

Alternatively, open the Color workspace, by going to Window > Workspaces > Color.

Premiere Color Workspace menu option

Here’s the footage I’m starting with:

This is a shot from our BenQ TK800 4K projector review. While it’s OK, the colors are a bit dull, and it’s lacking in contrast.

From inside the Lumetri Color panel, scroll down to and expand Color Wheels & Match.

Lumetri Color wheels and match

Choose the Comparison View button. This will change your program monitor into a split screen. The right half shows your current clip and timeline position. The left half shows your reference image. Underneath this is a mini timeline. Here you can scrub left or right to locate your reference material in the timeline.

Lumetri comparison view

Position this mini timeline playhead at your reference material. As this clip is from Big Buck Bunny, a screenshot of the original source material is a good choice for the reference. As you can see, the original is a much better image. The colors are better, the image is brighter, and there’s more contrast:

Lumetri color match source material

Once you’ve lined up your source material, press the Apply Match button. Premiere may take a few seconds to show any changes (depending on your computer), but it will eventually update.

Providing you’re happy with the match, select Comparison View again, to exit the comparison view.

Here’s the result. While it does not look exactly like the reference, it’s a lot better than it was:

Lumtri color matched image

Color Match Tool: Additional Options

Once you’re comfortable with color matching shots, there are some additional options available.

At the bottom of the program monitor (with the comparison view on), there are five buttons. From left to right, these are:

Shot or Frame Comparison. This will toggle the left image between your reference material, and a “before” preview—what your footage looked like before color matching:

Lumetri comparison view shot or frame comparison button

After pressing:

Premiere comparison view before color matching

The Side by Side button shows the source and reference views next to each other. This is the default view:

Lumetri comparison view side by side button

The Vertical Split button will change from side by side view, to an amalgamated view, with both the reference and source footage combining to make one image. You can click and drag on the vertical line to see more or less of the source or reference material.

Lumetri comparison view vertical split button

Here’s what it looks like:

Lumetri vertical split comparison

The Horizontal Split is similar to the vertical split, only this time the view is split horizontally:

Lumetri comparison view horizontal split button

Here’s what it looks like:

Lumetri horizontal split comparison

Finally, the Swap Sides button simply swaps the source and reference views:

Lumetri comparison view swap sides button

Here’s what it looks like:

Lumetri Swap Sides

All of these buttons exist to make things easier for you as a filmmaker. By exactly lining up your before and after shots, and closely comparing your source and reference material, you can be confident that your new image looks how you imagined it in your source material.

Adobe Premiere Color Matching in 5 Easy Steps

The color match tool isn’t perfect. It doesn’t always get things right, and it’s not a substitute for true color grading and correction. Simple changes to exposure, contrast, and white balance can make a big difference. However, the color matching tool is an excellent way to start color grading your footage, especially if you have never color graded before.

In summary, here are the steps required to use the Adobe Premiere Pro color match tool:

  1. Choose your source material: Anything will do for source material, even shots from big budget productions.
  2. Enter the Color Wheels & Match area: This is inside the Lumetri Color panel.
  3. Select Comparison View: This shows the differences between your reference and source material.
  4. Scroll to your source material: Use the playhead underneath the reference view.
  5. Apply Match: Premiere will adjust the colors to match with one click.
    1. Now that you know how to use the color match tool, why not discover how to use LUTs in Adobe Premiere Pro?

      Read the full article: How to Use the Adobe Premiere Pro Color Match Tool