4K streaming doesn’t get much easier than this for $39

Roku now does 4K streaming for less than $50. That’s pretty much all you need to know.

This is going to be one of those reviews where we spoil everything from the jump. Roku Premiere (and the Walmart-exclusive Premiere+) bring 4K streaming down to under $50.

That’s it. That’s the important part. Everything else is secondary.

The Roku user experience? Same as it ever was. All those streaming “channels”? (What Roku calls “apps,” really.) Still there. Easy-to-use remote control? Yep.

This is a Roku streaming player that does 4K resolution and Dolby Atmos audio. And it’s relatively inexpensive.

Streaming TV

Roku Premiere (and Premiere+)

Roku’s entry-level 4K streamer sports ultra-high definition video and Dolby Atmos support.

You can now get a Roku streaming player with 4K resolution for less than $50. Roku Premiere lands at just $39, …

Roku now does 4K streaming for less than $50. That's pretty much all you need to know.

This is going to be one of those reviews where we spoil everything from the jump. Roku Premiere (and the Walmart-exclusive Premiere+) bring 4K streaming down to under $50.

That's it. That's the important part. Everything else is secondary.

The Roku user experience? Same as it ever was. All those streaming "channels"? (What Roku calls "apps," really.) Still there. Easy-to-use remote control? Yep.

This is a Roku streaming player that does 4K resolution and Dolby Atmos audio. And it's relatively inexpensive.

Streaming TV

Roku Premiere (and Premiere+)

Roku's entry-level 4K streamer sports ultra-high definition video and Dolby Atmos support.

You can now get a Roku streaming player with 4K resolution for less than $50. Roku Premiere lands at just $39, and the Premiere+ (an exclusive at Walmart) adds a voice remote for just $10 more. Both work great and don't break the bank.

$39 at Amazon

The Good

  • Great price, with a small footprint
  • Roku's excellent ease of use
  • All the streaming services Roku supports

The Bad

  • Wifi limited to 802.11n (aka Wifi 4)
  • Wireless only — no ethernet port

So good, so inexpensive

Roku Premiere: What I like

The story of the Roku Premiere pretty much starts and ends with the price. The Premiere is a mere $39. The Premiere+ — again, which is exclusive to Walmart and is the model I'm reviewing here — comes in at $49. The only real differences between the two are that Premiere+ comes with a voice remote, and it has a shortcut on the remote to Vudu — which is owned by Walmart.

It's the same Roku experience you've come to know and love.

Otherwise, we're looking at the same specs here. 4K resolution. Wifi 4, which until early October 2018 had been known as 802.11n. Dolby Atmos support for Audio. All the usual caveats apply of course. To take advantage of 4K streaming, you'll need a 4K-capable television. To use Dolby Atmos, you'll need a speaker setup that uses Atmos.

Assuming you've handled all that, what you end up with is your usual rock-solid Roku experience. Same user interface. Same menus. Same setup process. In fact, sign in with an existing Roku login and it'll automatically add all your channels. (You'll still have to sign back in, though.)

That's Roku's strength. It's simple to use, and it doesn't cost a whole lot.

Limited network

Roku Premiere: What I don't like

Here's all you need to know about the difference between the Roku Premiere and the Roku Streaming Stick+. It's all about the networking.

Roku Premiere tops out at Wifi 4 — aka 802.11n. Roku Streaming Stick Plus can do Wifi 5, heretofore known as 802.11ac. Wifi 5 is better than Wifi 4. Better range. Better connection.

Let's just hope your network is up to snuff.

Do you need Wifi 5 to properly stream 4K video? Not necessarily. It's going to depend on the strength of your wireless network as much as anything. So I can't tell you if you're going to need to spend $59 to get the Streaming Stick+ instead of Roku Premiere. I can't tell you if $39 for the Premiere will be good enough. It might well be.

I had occasional hiccups streaming 4K video. Nothing consistent, and nothing I wouldn't call ordinary hiccups in my home — I've got a lot of people streaming a lot of things a lot of the time. (Kids, ya know.)

The only other compliant would be that because of the form factor of the Premiere+ (it's what I call a "mini box"), there's no Ethernet port. Just HDMI, and power. So be it.

It's just a great box

Roku Premiere: The bottom line

4.5 out of 5

Roku Premiere (and Premiere+, too) is a simple product. It's 4K video, with HDR and Dolby Atmos, tucked into a small box. I wouldn't go so far to say it's hobbled by only having Wifi 4, but that's definitely a limiting factor when it comes to network performance.

Maybe that'll be a problem for you. Or maybe it won't.

What most certainly won't be an issue is the Roku end of things. It's the same excellent experience you'll find in every other Roku device. And it's going to get better.

$39 at Amazon

What you missed last week at CordCutters.com

You can spend a fortune on a new TV. But you really don’t have to.

You can spend a couple thousand dollars on a TV. And if you have a couple thousand dollars to spend on a TV, by all means do it. You’ll get something pretty incredible with an OLED panel.

But for those of us who don’t have a couple thousand dollars to spend on a TV, it’s not like we have to settle for some kind of lesser class of living. You can get a really good TV for less than $1,000 these days.

I’ve spent a few months with a 55-inch TCL 6-Series. It’s $649 (retail) for the 55-inch model, and $999 for a 65-incher. 4K resolution, Dolby Vision and HD 10, and Roku built in. For a lot of folks — a whole lot of folks, seeing as how Roku TVs make up a quarter of the smart TV market these days — that’s going to be plenty.

No, it’s not the same as Android TV or Apple TV, though you certainly can plug in a box (and set up the TV to use it by default) if you want to. It’s not quite as quick, perhaps, …

You can spend a fortune on a new TV. But you really don't have to.

You can spend a couple thousand dollars on a TV. And if you have a couple thousand dollars to spend on a TV, by all means do it. You'll get something pretty incredible with an OLED panel.

But for those of us who don't have a couple thousand dollars to spend on a TV, it's not like we have to settle for some kind of lesser class of living. You can get a really good TV for less than $1,000 these days.

I've spent a few months with a 55-inch TCL 6-Series. It's $649 (retail) for the 55-inch model, and $999 for a 65-incher. 4K resolution, Dolby Vision and HD 10, and Roku built in. For a lot of folks — a whole lot of folks, seeing as how Roku TVs make up a quarter of the smart TV market these days — that's going to be plenty.

No, it's not the same as Android TV or Apple TV, though you certainly can plug in a box (and set up the TV to use it by default) if you want to. It's not quite as quick, perhaps, Roku just has a different feel about it. But if your goal is to just watch your shows on a good (again, really good) TV for the price with a smart system that is easy to use, I'd have a hard time recommending something else at this point.

See at Amazon

Read the full TCL 6-Series review at CordCutters.com

Here's what else you missed last week at CordCutters.com:

What you missed this week at CordCutters.com

Amazon might not have invented over-the-air TV, but it’s about to make it even bigger.

The new Amazon Fire TV Recast is going to be a big deal for cord-cutters. Actually, that whole over-the-air antenna space is a big deal for cord-cutters, and has been for a long time.

But it also plays a crucial role going forward. One of the biggest questions we get regards local channels. (And for a lot of folks, especially this time of year, college football.) While streaming services are getting better about carrying local channels, the simple fact is that you get more locally available channels with a decent over-the-air antenna. And once you’ve gotten past the initial hardware expenditure — you get get an indoor antenna for as little as $20, and a decent outdoor antenna for maybe twice that — the content is free.

Consider: I can get my local ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox affiliates on a streaming service. But I can get something like 30 locally available channels with an antenn…

Amazon might not have invented over-the-air TV, but it's about to make it even bigger.

The new Amazon Fire TV Recast is going to be a big deal for cord-cutters. Actually, that whole over-the-air antenna space is a big deal for cord-cutters, and has been for a long time.

But it also plays a crucial role going forward. One of the biggest questions we get regards local channels. (And for a lot of folks, especially this time of year, college football.) While streaming services are getting better about carrying local channels, the simple fact is that you get more locally available channels with a decent over-the-air antenna. And once you've gotten past the initial hardware expenditure — you get get an indoor antenna for as little as $20, and a decent outdoor antenna for maybe twice that — the content is free.

Consider: I can get my local ABC, CBS, NBC and Fox affiliates on a streaming service. But I can get something like 30 locally available channels with an antenna. Do I watch them all? Nope. But I can if I want to. For free.

Anyway. The Recast is a big deal because, first, it's Amazon. And also because it makes it super easy to record OTA TV. It might not be the perfect all-in-one device — Tablo and HDHomerun still do great jobs. (Though if I were them I'd definitely be a little worried.) But it's Amazon. It's a big deal.

Andrew Martonik was at Thursday's Amazon event, and we caught up on the Amazon Recast on the latest episode of the CordCutters Podcast.

Here's what else you missed this week:

Alpine Halo9 review: CarPlay is big and brilliant

The Alpine iLX-F309 Halo9 has a floating 9-inch display but only needs a single-DIN space in your dash. It’s about $899 at Amazon.

This may be the best way for just about anyone to get Android Auto or Apple CarPlay.

If you want to experience Android Auto — that is, if you want to experience Android Auto the right way — you’re going to need to do it on a touchscreen. Sure, you can get Android Auto on a phone and that’s great, because it’s better than nothing and it opens the platform up to anyone with an Android phone. It’s just not the same as having it on a big screen.

The problem is that not everyone can have a big screen. Some cars just can’t handle a double-DIN unit, which is to say they don’t have room for that much hardware.

Enter the Alpine iLX-F309 — aka the Halo9. It’s a $900 head unit that handles Android Auto as well as Apple’s CarPlay. It does either with just a single USB port — and more important is that it fits in a single-DIN …

The Alpine iLX-F309 Halo9 has a floating 9-inch display but only needs a single-DIN space in your dash. It's about $899 at Amazon.

This may be the best way for just about anyone to get Android Auto or Apple CarPlay.

If you want to experience Android Auto — that is, if you want to experience Android Auto the right way — you're going to need to do it on a touchscreen. Sure, you can get Android Auto on a phone and that's great, because it's better than nothing and it opens the platform up to anyone with an Android phone. It's just not the same as having it on a big screen.

The problem is that not everyone can have a big screen. Some cars just can't handle a double-DIN unit, which is to say they don't have room for that much hardware.

Enter the Alpine iLX-F309 — aka the Halo9. It's a $900 head unit that handles Android Auto as well as Apple's CarPlay. It does either with just a single USB port — and more important is that it fits in a single-DIN space.

Oh, and the screen is 9 inches diagonal. Intrigued? Let's forage on.

Alpine iLX-F309 Halo9

Price: $899 retail

Bottom line: It's not inexpensive, but it's incredibly easy (and fun) to use, with a large touchscreen, access to Android Auto and Apple CarPlay (among other sources), and it fits in most cars.

See at Amazon

The Good

  • Large capacitive screen in a single-DIN format
  • Single USB port for Android Auto or CarPlay
  • Dedicated GPS antenna
  • Loads of options for car stereo enthusiasts

The Bad

  • Not inexpensive
  • No remote control
  • Screen isn't detachable for security

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Spend the money — it's worth it

Alpine Halo9 What I like

I've used Android Auto and Apple CarPlay for as long as they've been around. They are two of the more important features Google and Apple have added to their phones in recent memory, for one simple reason:

They make you safer in the car. That is, they'll keep you from playing with your phone while you're driving.

Let's not pretend that you're never going to use your phone in the car. It's simply not realistic. However, that doesn't mean you can't use your phone in a safe and secure manner. If your vehicle doesn't have an option for Android Auto or CarPlay built in, the Halo9 may well be the best aftermarket option.

Consider this: A 9-inch display is great. I'd almost argue it's a little too big, actually — some of the graphics in Android Auto and (especially) in CarPlay get a little glitchy at that size but at just WVGA resolution, with round icons occasionally gaining corners, and individual pixels very much visible in places. That's nitpicking, though. My wife has a 7-inch touchscreen in her car (capacitive, at that), and I'm never going back.

The trick, then, is how to get a 9-inch display in a car that decidedly was not built for such a beast. That's bigger than even what a double-DIN setup would allow.

In this case, Alpine has the screen extended from the body of the head unit, which fits nicely inside a single-DIN space. It's somewhat adjustable, so you can find the right fit between any controls and your air-conditioner vents. However, this isn't the sort of thing you'll be adjusting on the fly. So you'll want to work with your installer to make sure you get things fitted as well as you can before you drive off.

The Halo9 is a great aftermarket experience for Android Auto and Apple CarPlay. Period.

While it's adjustable, it's not mechanical. The screen doesn't get sucked back into the body of the head unit, nor does it easily remove for added security. It's going to stand out a bit, very much in a good way, unless you'd prefer the interior of your car to be a little more inconspicuous. It's nowhere near the 15-inch touchscreen of a Tesla Model 3, but this thing is going to get noticed.

For shared vehicles, you'll love the fact that the Halo9 requires just a single USB port for Android Auto and CarPlay. Just plug in with the appropriate cable, and you're set. No tweaking settings, no second port needed.

While I'm not usually a fan of aftermarket user interfaces, Alpine's is one of the better ones. You get a mess of options, from Bluetooth and HD Radio to satellite radio, Pandora, and an AUX port. Alpine allows you to set favorites from any of the inputs (including phone calls, by the way), making it extremely quick and easy to access just about anything, should you decide to venture outside Android Auto or CarPlay.

And that's just the bare bones. There's a world of options in addition to all that, including backup cameras and the KAC-001 Accessory Controller, and the iDatalink Maestro Module.

What I don't like

Look, there's not too much to not like here. I can nitpick over the small graphical hiccups in Android Auto and CarPlay at that 9-inch size and WVGA resolution, but that's not really Alpine's fault. Google and Apple maybe didn't really take this product into consideration when designing things, and it's something that maybe could improve in software at some point.

I'm also maybe not crazy about the capacitive buttons below the screen. This is where you'll adjust the volume and get into the favorites, seek, fast forward, and all that jazz. Capacitive buttons aren't ideal for this because they don't have any sort of tactile feel to them. But keep in mind that if your steering wheel has controls on it (and mine doesn't) you'll probably not need them too often. While maybe I'd prefer a remote control in this instance, it's not a deal-killer (especially given how much the Halo9 already costs).

There's also no support for optical media — no CDs or DVDs — and no SD card. I'm actually fine with that — they're outdated forms of media and something I haven't wanted to use in years anyway. However, if it's one of those things you just have to have, you'll want to look elsewhere.

And, finally, it's possible that a 9-inch screen is just too big for you. I'll strongly disagree, though, and am willing to come to your house and argue that you're wrong until you see the light.

Just saying.

Alpine iLX-F309 Halo9

4.5 out of 5

There's not too much to overthink here. The Halo9 fits a very large screen in a small space. It supports both Android Auto and Apple CarPlay, and it does so with just a single USB port. It's got a ton of bells and whistles beyond that, sounds great and is easy to use, even if you're not a serious car stereo enthusiast.

It's more expensive than other Android Auto and CarPlay options — but it's also a much better experience.

See at Amazon

How your iPhone can help you through hurricane season

What apps and websites do you need to track hurricane season? How can your iPhone help? Here’s what you need to know!

By mid-September, hurricane season is in full swing. With Hurricane Florence, now a Category 4, set to hit the East Coast on Thursday, there’s no better time than now to bone up on some of the best ways to keep current on what’s out there and how to stay safe if a storm comes your way.

And just like with everything else, your iPhone now play an integral part with that.

I’ve lived on the Gulf Coast my entire life. I’ve been through storms and God willing, I’ll never go through another. Either way, I’ll be ready. Let’s take a look at a few ways you can be, too.

Websites and apps

If you only use one website for tracking tropical activity, it needs to be the National Hurricane Center’s (NHC) site, found at www.nhc.noaa.gov (they’ve got a mobile version, too, if you’re into that sort of thing).

I also recommend Weather Underground’s site, too, and the blog written …

What apps and websites do you need to track hurricane season? How can your iPhone help? Here's what you need to know!

By mid-September, hurricane season is in full swing. With Hurricane Florence, now a Category 4, set to hit the East Coast on Thursday, there's no better time than now to bone up on some of the best ways to keep current on what's out there and how to stay safe if a storm comes your way.

And just like with everything else, your iPhone now play an integral part with that.

I've lived on the Gulf Coast my entire life. I've been through storms and God willing, I'll never go through another. Either way, I'll be ready. Let's take a look at a few ways you can be, too.

Websites and apps

If you only use one website for tracking tropical activity, it needs to be the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) site, found at www.nhc.noaa.gov (they've got a mobile version, too, if you're into that sort of thing).

I also recommend Weather Underground's site, too, and the blog written by Jeff Masters.

What about apps, though? I've used a few over the years. Mostly they're wrappers for the NHC website, and for the most part, the apps themselves are pretty crap. They can, however, be good for notifications on updates, which the NHC puts out every six hours. If you don't want to spend a few bucks, you could just hit up the NHC site, follow their Twitter feed, use RSS, or subscribe via e-mail. The NHC has a lot of ways to stay informed.

One of the best-rated apps for iPhone is Hurricane Pro, which costs $4.

And if you just don't want to bother committing all of these tips to memory, go for the America Red Cross' hurricane app.

If you want more than hurricane tracking, as important as that is, check out iMore's best weather apps as well.

More: The best weather apps for iPhone

Your iPhone

There's almost nothing worse than knowing a hurricane is headed your way. They're big, they're often slow, and have the potential to cause a lot of damage. Luckily, you usually have days or even weeks of warning. That gives you plenty of time to prepare and your iPhone makes it easier than ever.

A few tips I've picked up the hard way:

  1. Inventory your home and car. Use notes apps that sync to the cloud (that's the really important part) to keep track of everything you own, for insurance purposes. If it's not documented, it might as well have never existed.
  2. Take pictures. Lots of pictures. The outside of your home. The inside of your home. Pets. Kids. Anything of value. Insurance fraud, unfortunately, is a thing. You'll want to prove your car didn't already have that tree on it. Again, make sure your pictures are uploaded to a cloud service like iCloud Photo Library, Google Photos, or Dropbox.
  3. Charge early and often. When the power goes out, it goes out.
  4. That said, data could well be down after a strong storm. (Though operators will be quick to tell you they've been hardening against storms.) If that's the case enjoy the silence, and don't waste battery if you don't have to.

Speaking of charging ...

Batteries are our lifeblood — I mean, our phones' lifeblood. If you want any hope of communicating after a storm or keeping up with folks during one, you'll need to stay charged. The good news is that even if you don't (or can't) use a full-blown generator, we've got options.

We've seen an explosion (figuratively, that is) of small and inexpensive external batteries. This very much changes the game for post-storm charging. You should have a few on hand. We're fans of this 20,000 mAh battery from Anker. It supports USB-A and USB-C, so it'll charge pretty much everything.

Something more expensive, and maybe a little crazy (in a good way) is the Anker PowerHouse — a 434Wh (that's somewhere in the neighborhood of 120,000 mAh) ginormous AC or solar-powered backup battery/inverter.

For other options, check out our list of the best battery packs for your iPhone.

Other random things worth buying

Batteries are obvious, along with battery or gas-powered lamps, and food that doesn't spoil.

I also recommend picking up a sun shower of some sort. These are large PVC bags that use the sun to heat the water within, and then rely on gravity to rain it down upon your body. I used them on boats growing up, but they're perfect for post-storm showers. You don't need electricity to heat the water, they're portable, and they're easy to store.

This one looks just fine — but you've basically got your pick on Amazon. If you're buying locally, any sporting goods store or boat store should have them in stock.

I'd also recommend picking up a battery-powered AM/FM Weather radio. Again, you need to conserve things like your phone for when you really need them. These ancient little radios run on batteries and will keep you up with important local info as well with NOAA weather radio. They're indispensable once the power goes out. (It's what us old people had before Twitter, and with less trolling.

Your hurricane tips?

If you've been through more than your fair share of hurricane seasons, and have great tips of your own to share, let me know all about them in the comments below!

Updated September 2018: Added information about Hurricane Florence, along with our list of the best battery packs for your iPhone.

What’s new on Netflix in September 2018

Wakanda forever. And some other stuff.

Look, you don’t have to be the world’s biggest MCU fan. You don’t have to care about Avengers or super heros or any of that stuff. But Black Panther is worth watching, and it’s worth watching several times. And that’s why we’re stoked that it’s coming to Netflix on Sept. 4.

And there are, of course, a bunch of Netflix Originals on the way. Atypical hits season 2, as does Iron Fist. (OK, OK, it’s another MCU thing.) And the trailer for Maniac is, well, insane. (And how good is Justin Theroux in just about everything?)

Put it this way: It’s going to be one hell of a month. Here’s what’s coming up.

Get a free Netflix trial

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 1

10,000 B.C.
Another Cinderella Story
Assassins
August Rush
Bruce Almighty
Delirium
Fair Game
Groundhog Day
King Kong
La Catedral del Mar (Netflix Original): In 14th-century Barcelona, a serf’s determined climb to wealth and freedom incurs the disdain of the noble class and the suspicion of t…

Wakanda forever. And some other stuff.

Look, you don't have to be the world's biggest MCU fan. You don't have to care about Avengers or super heros or any of that stuff. But Black Panther is worth watching, and it's worth watching several times. And that's why we're stoked that it's coming to Netflix on Sept. 4.

And there are, of course, a bunch of Netflix Originals on the way. Atypical hits season 2, as does Iron Fist. (OK, OK, it's another MCU thing.) And the trailer for Maniac is, well, insane. (And how good is Justin Theroux in just about everything?)

Put it this way: It's going to be one hell of a month. Here's what's coming up.

Get a free Netflix trial

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 1

  • 10,000 B.C.
  • Another Cinderella Story
  • Assassins
  • August Rush
  • Bruce Almighty
  • Delirium
  • Fair Game
  • Groundhog Day
  • King Kong
  • La Catedral del Mar (Netflix Original): In 14th-century Barcelona, a serf's determined climb to wealth and freedom incurs the disdain of the noble class and the suspicion of the Inquisition.
  • Martian Child
  • Monkey Twins (Netflix Original): Inspired by Khon dance drama and Thai martial arts, a fighter scarred by the past joins forces with a determined cop to battle an organized crime ring.
  • Mr. Sunshine (Netflix Original): A young boy who ends up in the U.S. after the 1871 Shinmiyangyo incident returns to Korea at a historical turning point and falls for a noblewoman.
  • Nacho Libre
  • Pearl Harbor
  • Scarface
  • Sisters (Netflix Original): Her dad's deathbed confession leads Julia to discover she has more than 100 brothers and two sisters: troubled TV star Roxy and uptight lawyer Edie.
  • Spider-Man 3
  • Stephanie
  • Summer Catch
  • Sydney White
  • The Ant Bully
  • The Breakfast Club
  • The Cider House Rules
  • The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy
  • The Keeping Hours
  • The River Wild
  • The Texas Chainsaw Massacre: The Beginning
  • Two Weeks Notice
  • Unforgiven

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 2

  • Disney's Lilo & Stitch
  • Disney's The Emperor's New Groove
  • Maynard
  • Quantico: Season 3

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 3

  • A Taiwanese Tale of Two Cities (Netflix Original): Two brainy beauty queens — same heritage, on separate coasts -- and one fateful decision that soon links their paths.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 4

  • Marvel Studios' Black Panther

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 5

  • Van Helsing: Season 2
  • Wentworth: Season 6

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 6

  • Once Upon a Time: Season 7

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 7

  • Atypical: Season 2 (Netflix Original): While Elsa and Doug face the aftermath of their marriage crisis and Casey tries to adjust to her new school, Sam prepares for life after graduation.
  • Cable Girls: Season 3 (Netflix Original): After a tragedy, Lidia fights passionately for her family, Carlota finds her voice, Ángeles goes undercover and Marga reveals a talent for accounting.
  • City of Joy (Netflix Original): Women who've been sexually brutalized in war-torn Congo begin to heal at City of Joy, a center that helps them regain a sense of self and empowerment.
  • Click
  • First and Last (Netflix Original): Filmmakers go inside Georgia's Gwinnett County Jail to capture two days that define an inmate's experience: the first and last.
  • Marvel's Iron Fist: Season 2 (Netflix Original): With the defeat of the Hand, Chinatown is left vulnerable to turf wars, and Danny must protect the streets of New York.
  • Next Gen (Netflix Original): A friendship with a top-secret robot turns a lonely girl's life into a thrilling adventure as they take on bullies, evil bots and a scheming madman.
  • Sierra Burgess Is A Loser (Netflix Film): Smart high school girl Sierra teams up with a more popular girl hoping to win over her crush. Starring Shannon Purser (Barb on "Stranger Things").
  • Stretch Armstrong & the Flex Fighters: Season 2 (Netflix Original): Wrongly accused for the attack on Rook Tower, the Flex Fighters must protect their city as wanted men. Will Charter City ever trust them again?
  • The Most Assassinated Woman in the World (Netflix Film): In 1930s Paris, an actress famous for her gory death scenes at the Grand Guignol Theater contends with a mysterious stalker and ghosts from her past.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 10

  • Call the Midwife: Series 7

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 11

  • Daniel Sloss: Live Shows (Netflix Original): The dark mind of Daniel Sloss is back, and he's ready to find the funny in some very taboo topics, from the deeply personal to the highly irreverent.
  • The Resistance Banker (Netflix Film): Risking his family and future, a banker in occupied Amsterdam slows the Nazi war machine by creating an underground bank to fund the resistance.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 12

  • Blacklist: Season 5
  • Life (Netflix Original): At Korea's top university medical center, ideals and interests collide between a patient-centered ER doctor and the hospital's newly-appointed CEO.
  • On My Skin (Netflix Film): Arrested for a drug-related offense, Stefano Cucchi suffers at the hands of Italy's Carabinieri police and a broken legal system. Based on true events.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 14

  • American Vandal: Season 2 (Netflix Original): In the wake of the first documentary's success, Peter and Sam seek a new case and settle on a stomach-churning mystery at a Washington high school.
  • Bleach (Netflix Film): When high schooler Ichigo is suddenly given reaper abilities, he really wants to give the powers back. But he'll have to reap some souls first.
  • Boca Juniors Confidential (Netflix Original): This docuseries profiles Argentine soccer power Boca Juniors, highlighting the relationships between coaches and players as they contend for trophies.
  • BoJack Horseman: Season 5 (Netflix Original): BoJack's back on screen as the star of "Philbert," a new detective series produced by Princess Carolyn. But his demons are out in full force.
  • Car Masters: Rust to Riches (Netflix Original): The colorful crew at Gotham Garage overhauls an eclectic collection of cars, trading their way up to a showstopper they can sell for big bucks. Ingobernable: Season 2 (Netflix Original): Emilia takes on the leader of a drug trafficking empire in her fight to reunite her family and reduce corruption in her country.
  • LAST HOPE (Netflix Original): After causing the near extinction of mankind seven years ago, genius scientist Leon Lau must now fight the ecological disaster he unwittingly created. Norm Macdonald has a Show (Netflix Original): Comedian Norm Macdonald hosts this talk show with celebrity guests, unexpected conversation and a behind-the-scenes view into Norm's world.
  • Super Monsters Monster Party: Songs (Netflix Original): Sing along and move to this groovy collection of music videos featuring monster friends Katya, Lobo, Zoe, Drac, Cleo and Frankie!
  • The Angel (Netflix Film): While operating at the highest levels of Egypt's government, Ashraf Marwan walks a dangerously thin line as a spy for Israel. Based on a true story.
  • The Dragon Prince (Netflix Original): Two human princes forge an unlikely bond with the elven assassin sent to kill them, embarking on an epic quest to bring peace to their warring lands.
  • The Land of Steady Habits (Netflix Film): After leaving his wife and his job to find happiness, Anders begins a clumsy, heartbreaking quest to reassemble the pieces of his fractured life.
  • The World's Most Extraordinary Homes: Season 2 Part A (Netflix Original): Piers and Caroline head to Portugal, Switzerland, Japan and the United States to tour more one-of-a-kind homes with extraordinary architecture.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 15

  • Inside The Freemasons: Season 1

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 16

  • Role Models
  • Scott Pilgrim vs. the World

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 17

  • The Witch

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 18

  • American Horror Story: Cult D.L. Hughley: Contrarian (Netflix Original): Comedian D.L. Hughley riffs on politics, "Black Panther," his upbringing and more in a rapid-fire stand-up show at Philadelphia's Merriam Theater.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 21

  • Battlefish (Netflix Original): Over the course of the fishing season, a group of fishing boats pursues the lucrative albacore tuna in the competitive waters off the Oregon coast.
  • DRAGON PILOT: Hisone & Masotan (Netflix Original): Recently stationed Air Self-Defense Force rookie Hisone Amakasu is chosen by a dragon concealed within Gifu Air Base to be his pilot.
  • Hilda (Netflix Original): Join Hilda as she travels from a wilderness full of elves and giants to Trolberg, a bustling city packed with new friends and mysterious creatures.
  • Maniac: Limited Series (Netflix Original): Two strangers find themselves caught up in a mind-bending pharmaceutical trial gone awry. Starring Emma Stone and Jonah Hill.
  • Nappily Ever After (Netflix Film): Violet has it all: the perfect job, the perfect relationship and the perfect hair. Until she doesn't. What happens when being perfect isn't enough?
  • Quincy (Netflix Original): The life and career of legendary music producer Quincy Jones are traced in this biographical documentary directed by his daughter, Rashida Jones.
  • The Good Cop (Netflix Original): Honest cop Tony Jr. gets advice from his unscrupulous father, retired NYPD officer Tony Sr., about everything from his job to his love life.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 23

  • The Walking Dead: Season 8

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 25

  • Disney's A Wrinkle in Time
  • Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean: The Curse of the Black Pearl

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 26

  • Norsemen: Season 2 (Netflix Original): The sea road to the west has been found, but Norheim's villagers must still cope with power struggles and the ever-present threat of Jarl Varg.
  • The Hurricane Heist

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 28

  • Chef's Table: Volume 5 (Netflix Original): This season, meet four innovative chefs who are shaking up the food culture in Philadelphia, Istanbul, Bangkok and Barcelona.
  • El Marginal: Season 2 (Netflix Original): Set three years before the first season, this award-winning Argentine series explores the backstory of criminals and cops operating in the shadows of San Onofre.
  • Forest of Piano (Netflix Original): Kai grows up playing an old piano discarded in the woods; Shuhei's father is a famous pianist. Their chance meeting transforms their lives and music.
  • Hold the Dark (Netflix Film): Summoned to a remote Alaskan village to search for wolves that took a local boy, a naturalist soon finds himself caught in a harrowing mystery.
  • Jack Whitehall: Travels with My Father: Season 2 (Netflix Original): This season, Jack and his not-so-adventurous dad, Michael, tackle Europe, including the Bavarian Alps, Istanbul, Budapest, Romania, Moldova and Ukraine.
  • Lessons From A School Shooting: Notes from Dunblane (Netflix Original): Devastated by the school shooting in his town, a priest from Sandy Hook, Connecticut, bonds with a Scottish priest who experienced a similar tragedy.
  • Lost Song (Netflix Original): War looms over the kingdom of Neunatia, where two young women are both burdened and blessed by the power of song.
  • Made in Mexico (Netflix Original): Get to know the opulent lifestyles and infamous dynasties of Mexico City's socialites and the expats vying for a spot in their exclusive social order.
  • Reboot: The Guardian Code: Season 2 (Netflix Original): With Megabyte, Hexadecimal and the evil Sourcerer still at large, the rebooted Guardians face a new season of threats -- both at home and online.
  • Skylanders Academy: Season 3 (Netflix Original): Season 3 finds Spyro and the Skylanders forging unexpected alliances, taking on new adventures and even straddling the line between good and evil.
  • The 3rd Eye (Netflix Original): After the death of their parents, two sisters move back to their childhood home, where one sibling claims to be able to see a dark presence.
  • Two Catalonias (Netflix Film): Lawmakers and activists with conflicting ideologies speak about the complexities of Catalonia's politics and the fight for its independence from Spain.

Coming to Netflix on Sept. 30

  • Big Miracle

What's leaving Netflix in September

  • 13 Going on 30 (Sept. 1)
  • A Royal Night Out (Sept. 1)
  • Batman Begins (Sept. 1)
  • Casino (Sept. 1)
  • Dead Poets Society (Sept. 1)
  • Disney's Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest (Sept. 1)
  • Exporting Raymond (Sept. 1)
  • Forgetting Sarah Marshall (Sept. 1)
  • Ghostbusters (Sept. 1)
  • Hachi: A Dog's Tale (Sept. 1)
  • Hotel for Dogs (Sept. 1)
  • I Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry (Sept. 1)
  • It Might Get Loud (Sept. 1)
  • Joyful Noise (Sept. 1)
  • Just Friends (Sept. 1)
  • Lockup: County Jails: Collection 1 (Sept. 1)
  • Man on Wire (Sept. 1)
  • Stuart Little 3: Call of the Wild (Sept. 1)
  • The Assets (Sept. 1)
  • The Bucket List (Sept. 1)
  • The Dark Knight (Sept. 1)
  • The Descent (Sept. 1)
  • The Descent: Part 2 (Sept. 1)
  • Outsourced (Sept. 2)
  • Waffle Street (Sept. 2)
  • Rules of Engagement: Seasons 1 - 7 (Sept. 11)
  • Disney's Pete's Dragon (Sept. 14)
  • A Star Is Born (Sept. 15)
  • Before the Devil Knows You're Dead (Sept. 15)
  • Bordertown (Sept. 15)
  • Are You Here (Sept. 16)
  • Jackass 3.5: The Unrated Movie (Sept. 16)
  • Moonrise Kingdom (Sept. 16)
  • Iris (Sept. 24)
  • The Imitation Game (Sept. 28)

What you missed this week on CordCutters.com

Hype. You missed the hype. Or, maybe there’s been no way to avoid it.

Hype is a funny thing. It’s almost impossible to live up to, and yet it’s also impossible to avoid.

Amazon has been hyping Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan for what seems like forever. Months and months. And now it’s finally here, available for binging on all the platforms that support Amazon Prime Video. (Which is pretty much everything.) And the while I’m not usually a fan of blasting through series so fast it’s almost impossible to do so with any real enjoyment, Jack Ryan didn’t once slow the pace. At only eight episodes — with the longest coming in at barely over an hour, and the shortest clocking in at 42 minutes — it’s a quick, easy watch.

And the series was good. Maybe not great, but definitely watchable. John Krasinski is a pretty benign Jack Ryan — a character who perhaps is rivaled only by Jack Bauer when it comes to one person finding himself in the middle of all sorts of terror…

Hype. You missed the hype. Or, maybe there's been no way to avoid it.

Hype is a funny thing. It's almost impossible to live up to, and yet it's also impossible to avoid.

Amazon has been hyping Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan for what seems like forever. Months and months. And now it's finally here, available for binging on all the platforms that support Amazon Prime Video. (Which is pretty much everything.) And the while I'm not usually a fan of blasting through series so fast it's almost impossible to do so with any real enjoyment, Jack Ryan didn't once slow the pace. At only eight episodes — with the longest coming in at barely over an hour, and the shortest clocking in at 42 minutes — it's a quick, easy watch.

And the series was good. Maybe not great, but definitely watchable. John Krasinski is a pretty benign Jack Ryan — a character who perhaps is rivaled only by Jack Bauer when it comes to one person finding himself in the middle of all sorts of terrorist hijinks. Wendell Pierce is great as Jim Greer (with a spoiler-riffic — yet ultimately superficial secret, and his expletives remain in the caliber of Mr. Samuel Leroy Jackson.

But after digesting things for a bit, I think maybe it was Ali Suliman — as terrorist mastermind Mousa Suleiman — who brought the best performance to the series. It's too easy for the terrorist storyline to employ the usual tropes. And while some of that is unavoidable, he still brings a human aspect to the role — and that humanity plays an important twist later in the series.

So does Jack Ryan live up to the hype? Maybe not. But then again maybe there's no way it could. It's good. I'll watch the second season, for sure. But ultimately it's a decent action series in the same vein as Jack Bauer and Jason Bourne, borrowing the characters from Tom Clancy's world.

Check out Tom Clancy's Jack Ryan on Amazon Prime Video and let me know what you think.

Here's what else you missed this week on CordCutters.com:

What it’s like to live under the Google Advanced Protection Program

The author, and the new Google Titan security key, which uses the U2F protocols developed by the FIDO Alliance to provide a secure second factor of online authentication. The Titan security key is now on sale in the Google Store.

The strongest consumer-level security Google offers requires a few trade-offs, but it also gives a great deal of peace of mind.

I am not what I’d call a Very Important Person. I still consider myself a journalist of sorts (and it’s what’s on my college degree), but I wouldn’t say I practice it in the way I did back when I made newspapers. I also am neither an activist, business leader, or am on a political campaign team.

Am I really a candidate for Google’s Advanced Protection Program? Do I really need the strongest account security Google offers publicly?

I’ll answer that in a minute. But first, I’ll define what I think I am these days: I’m approaching middle age while watching my daughters begin their online lives, and I’m as convinced as ever that the …

The author, and the new Google Titan security key, which uses the U2F protocols developed by the FIDO Alliance to provide a secure second factor of online authentication. The Titan security key is now on sale in the Google Store.

The strongest consumer-level security Google offers requires a few trade-offs, but it also gives a great deal of peace of mind.

I am not what I'd call a Very Important Person. I still consider myself a journalist of sorts (and it's what's on my college degree), but I wouldn't say I practice it in the way I did back when I made newspapers. I also am neither an activist, business leader, or am on a political campaign team.

Am I really a candidate for Google's Advanced Protection Program? Do I really need the strongest account security Google offers publicly?

I'll answer that in a minute. But first, I'll define what I think I am these days: I'm approaching middle age while watching my daughters begin their online lives, and I'm as convinced as ever that the Internet is inherently backwards and broken, and we all need to take our online security more seriously. (That is, if we're thinking about it at all.)

The question you have to ask yourself is why wouldn't you want to protect your online life as best you can.

Two-factor security should be mandatory. If a service doesn't provide it, you probably shouldn't use that service. But all two-factor schemes are not created equal. One-time passwords sent by SMS can be intercepted by a determined attacker. Software-based tokens are better, but not infallible. Better, still, are physical hardware keys. A physical key that you plug into a computer via USB, or by NFC or Bluetooth, that you connect to an account. Don't have the key? You're not getting in.

This is all part of the FIDO Alliance — "the World's Largest Ecosystem for Standards-Based, Interoperable Authentication" — and U2F, the "Universal 2-Factor" experience born from FIDO. You can basically think of U2F and 2FA as the same thing, and FIDO is the group that makes the standard happen, with folks from Google, Microsoft, Lenovo and Amazon (among others) on its board.

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The basics of the Advanced Protection Program

Physical hardware keys have been around as a second form of authentication for years, and they've been an security option for Google accounts for quite some time.

Google's Advanced Protection Program makes them a mandatory mechanism for logging in, and it makes them the only 2FA option. You'll still have your Google password, and now you'll have to use a physical hardware key in conjunction with that password to access your account. No more SMS codes. No more Google Authenticator app. No phone calls. It's password-and-key, or you're not getting in.

It's that simple, really. But Google does go a bit further. You'll still be able to log in to websites with your Google account. But apps that can access Gmail or Google Drive files will be severely limited. Here's how Google puts it:

To help protect you, Advanced Protection allows only Google apps and select third-party apps to access your emails and Drive files.

As a trade-off for this tightened security, the functionality of some of your apps may be affected. Most third-party apps that require access to your Gmail or Drive data, such as travel tracking apps, will no longer have permission. And you will only be able to use Chrome and Firefox to access your signed-in Google services like Gmail or Photos.

Apple's Mail, Calendar, and Contacts apps will continue to be able to access your Google data as normal.

That'll probably be the biggest hurdle you'll face in day-to-day use.

Google also throws extra roadblocks in front of someone if they try to pretend that they're you and you're logged out of your account.

A common way that hackers try to access your account is by impersonating you and pretending they have been locked out of your account. To give you the strongest protection against this type of fraudulent account access, Advanced Protection adds extra steps to verify your identity during the account recovery process.

If you ever lose access to your account and both of your Security Keys, these added verification requirements will take a few days to restore access to your account.

That's not one I've had to experience yet, but it doesn't sound like fun.

Most of us outside of a secure work environment won't have to use a physical key to authenticate very often, so it's more like an extremely strong method of protection.

What it's like to use Google Advanced Protection Program

First, hit up Google's Advanced Protection Program website. You'll be instructed to grab a couple of U2F keys. Previously Google recommended third-party keys, which are fine. But now that the Titan keys are available in the Google Store, it's just as easy to grab them. The way you use them will be exactly the same.

Once you have them, you'll actually enroll in the service. That'll turn on all the protections — and it'll also log you out of everything, for obvious reasons.

So, it's time to log back in. Or not. This is where things get a little interesting.

I now have to use Gmail in a web browser instead of in a wrapper like Mailplane or Shift. That's been a minor annoyance, but not really a showstopper. (Hell, it's one fewer app to be running in the background.) But it also means that Mac OS no longer has access to Gmail, either. That actually was a little surprising, given how well the Advanced Protection Program works with iOS via a helper "Smart Lock" app. Maybe it'll change at some point. But on the other hand I wouldn't trade Gmail in a browser for Apple's Mail app.

The Google Smartlock app on iPhone X.

Logging back into phones was easy enough. For that I used my Bluetooth/USB fob. The one I've had for a month or so now charges via microUSB, which is a little annoying. But, again, not a deal-breaker. If I want to use it with a phone, I connect via Bluetooth. If I want to use it with a computer, I plug it in. Easy enough. I've also used the Yubikey Neo, which is USB-A and has NFC built in, and it works great, too. Note that if you're using an iPhone, you'll need something with Bluetooth, at least until NFC is officially opened up in iOS 12.

Logging into a Pixelbook took all of 10 seconds. Type in my password, plug in a key and authenticate, and I'm up and running. (Though if you're really using a Chromebook and really using Advanced Protection you'll want to make sure you have other basic log-in security implemented, so someone can't just open the thing up and start using it. Same as any other laptop, really.)

The biggest hiccup for me has been with the NVIDIA Shield TV. (When you get logged out of everything, you get logged out of everything.) You'd think you'd be able to log into just like an Android phone. (Because it's an Android platform, after all.) But for whatever reason, it just doesn't work, same as if you tried to log in with some other untrusted third-party source.

Beyond that, things pretty much have been seamless. It's not like I have to log in to my account every day. (Though in some business environments, that's exactly what this physical key scheme is great for.)

If I do need to log in to a new device somewhere, I just have to make sure I have my key on me. So I keep one on my keys, and a backup in a safe place. (No, I'm not telling you where.)

By the way: You can un-enroll from the Google Advanced Protection Program if you just can't live with it. But I haven't felt that urge at all. Also, you can un-enroll keys from any service at any time -- you'll just have to remember which services you use a key with. (Or you can always just destroy a key if you're done with it.)

There's no single perfect key for everyone — it's very much going to depend on what devices you need to authenticate.

Which U2F key is best for Advanced Protection?

Here's where things really come down to your own situation. You can get a straight USB-A key. You can get a USB-C key. You can get a nano key (USB-A or USB-C) that lives in your laptop most of the time but doesn't get in the way (outside of taking up a port). You can get something with Bluetooth, or NFC.

You don't have to use Google's Titan Security Key if something else will work better for you.

(A note on that, though: The USB model of Google's Titan Security Key includes NFC, but it won't work at launch. That'll require a behind-the-scenes update on your phone. Other hardware keys handle NFC just fine, though, if you have to have it right this second.)

It all depends on just how often you need to log in to whatever it is you need to log in to, and the kind of device you're using. If your business requires daily authorization, but at a trusted computer (say, behind a bunch of locked doors), then maybe a USB-A nano key is the way to go. If, like me, you don't need to log in very often but still want everything Advanced Protection offers, something larger might not be awful. If you have a USB-C laptop and USB-C phone, well, that makes that decision even easier. It's going to vary depending on what you use.

And you don't necessarily need Google's Titan key, either. They function exactly the same as other U2F keys — only these have the might of Google behind them, controlling the firmware that's inside. (And that is a good selling point.) And unlike other keys, which can be manipulated by an IT department, the firmware is totally locked down. You'll be using these as Google intended.

The Google Titan key is equipped with NFC, but it'll require a background update before it'll work with Android phones.

So is Google's Advanced Protection Program the right thing for you?

That's one of those things that I can't answer for you.

The Advanced Protection Program is a little overkill, but it's also the right way to do security.

On one hand, I want to say yes, it is. I've found the tradeoff between security and annoyance to be minimal. It's not going to completely replace SMS codes and software-based tokens in any event, though it'd be nice if it did. The simple fact is not enough services use hardware keys. (And some only allow them as secondary 2FA methods.) Hit up twofactorauth.org to find out if your favorite service uses them.

And I'm really close to putting my daughter's account on it. (If I haven't already, because now that I'm writing this …)

I've had to help too many family members reclaim accounts before. It's just too easy to accidentally click on links that should never have been clicked. It happens to the best of us.

What we need is stronger back-end support to go along with the knowledge that the internet is backwards and broken and we have to be more vigilant.

Google Advanced Protection gives that support.

It's just up to us to use it. And I'm not turning it off.

What you missed this week on CordCutters.com

When new schedules come out, Netflix is what folks care about.

It’s interesting to see what folks care about on a daily basis. For instance: When the new monthly listings land, we’ve found that about twice as many folks care about what’s new on Netflix, compared to Amazon Prime Video. And folks care about the listings for Hulu by far less than that.

Anecdotally, it’s probably because Netflix has better content. Better (and more) original series, and original movies. That’s not to say that Amazon Prime Video doesn’t have its own, it’s just that Netflix very much seems to churn through more. (And let’s be honest, come are stinkers.)

Or maybe it’s because the Amazon Prime Video app is pretty atrocious on anything that’s not a Fire TV. Something has to be done about that.

What’s new on Netflix in September 2018What’s new on Amazon Prime Video in September 2018What’s new on Hulu in September 2018

Plus … Black Panther!

CordCutters Podcast Ep. 2 is up!

The second episode of the CordC…

When new schedules come out, Netflix is what folks care about.

It's interesting to see what folks care about on a daily basis. For instance: When the new monthly listings land, we've found that about twice as many folks care about what's new on Netflix, compared to Amazon Prime Video. And folks care about the listings for Hulu by far less than that.

Anecdotally, it's probably because Netflix has better content. Better (and more) original series, and original movies. That's not to say that Amazon Prime Video doesn't have its own, it's just that Netflix very much seems to churn through more. (And let's be honest, come are stinkers.)

Or maybe it's because the Amazon Prime Video app is pretty atrocious on anything that's not a Fire TV. Something has to be done about that.

What's new on Netflix in September 2018
What's new on Amazon Prime Video in September 2018
What's new on Hulu in September 2018

Plus ... Black Panther!

CordCutters Podcast Ep. 2 is up!

The second episode of the CordCutters Podcast is up. And this time, we get personal. It's been two years since my family got rid of cable TV. My wife, Shannon, and I discuss how we went about it, and what it's been like in those two years.

Here's what else you missed this week at CordCutters.com:

And that, as they say, is that.

What’s new on Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Hulu in September 2018

Black Panther lands on Netflix on Sept. 4. (Image credit: Netflix)

Black Panther. King Lear. … And probably some other king things.

A new month is nearly upon us, and that means it’s time to take a look at what’s coming to some of your favorite streaming TV services. Three of them, in fact.

What’s new on Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Hulu? All kinds of things.

Black Panther hits Netflix on Sept. 4, so you can fight for the future of Wakanda all over again. And we’re absolutely looking forward to the trippy Netflix original Maniac as well. Amazon Prime Video has original series like Pete the Cat (it’s one groovy kids show) and family thriller Forever. And on Hulu, you’ll find some of your favorite series and movies, along with fresh live shows.

One way or another, there’s something for everyone in September.

What’s new on Netflix in September 2018What’s new on Amazon Prime Video in September 2018What’s new on Hulu in September 2018

Introducing CordCutters.com!

The…

Black Panther lands on Netflix on Sept. 4. (Image credit: Netflix)

Black Panther. King Lear. ... And probably some other king things.

A new month is nearly upon us, and that means it's time to take a look at what's coming to some of your favorite streaming TV services. Three of them, in fact.

What's new on Netflix, Amazon Prime Video and Hulu? All kinds of things.

Black Panther hits Netflix on Sept. 4, so you can fight for the future of Wakanda all over again. And we're absolutely looking forward to the trippy Netflix original Maniac as well. Amazon Prime Video has original series like Pete the Cat (it's one groovy kids show) and family thriller Forever. And on Hulu, you'll find some of your favorite series and movies, along with fresh live shows.

One way or another, there's something for everyone in September.

What's new on Netflix in September 2018
What's new on Amazon Prime Video in September 2018
What's new on Hulu in September 2018